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Source: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Baydar, Nazli
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Effects of Maternal Employment and Child-Care Arrangements in Infancy on Preschoolers' Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY
Working Paper, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, January 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Care; Child Development; Children, Academic Development; Children, Behavioral Development; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "Effects of Maternal Employment and Child-Care Arrangements in Infancy on Preschoolers' Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY." Working Paper, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, January 1991.
2. Baydar, Nazli
Paikoff, Roberta L.
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Effects of Childcare Arrangements on Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes: Evidence from a National Sample of 3-4 Year Olds
Unpublished Manuscript, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, 1990
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Care; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli, Roberta L. Paikoff and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "Effects of Childcare Arrangements on Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes: Evidence from a National Sample of 3-4 Year Olds." Unpublished Manuscript, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, 1990.
3. Hayward, Mark D.
Grady, William R.
Hardy, Melissa A.
Occupational Consequences for Men's Early Retirement
report, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, 1985
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Early Retirement; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Tenure; Occupations; Retirement

This study examines the consequences of the occupational work context for men's early retirement. The project consists of three major stages. The first stage focuses on the relationship between the nature of work in the occupation and the occupationally-based opportunity structure for older men's labor force participation. The intent is to identify those features of the occupational context that help define older men's opportunity structure. In the second stage of the project, the analysis focuses on the direct contributions of the occupational context to early retirement relative to traditional retirement determinants. The results indicate that while occupational characteristics are not the dominant force directly influencing early retirement, there is some age-grading of occupational effects such that both task and non-task occupational characteristics gain or lose their direct salience for retirement depending on the age of incumbents. Finally, in the third stage of the study, the analyses address whether the impact of traditional retirement determinants is shaped by the nature of the work. The analyses indicate that the occupation serves to structure the influence of several key determinants of early retirement--particularly the effects of health status and job tenure. In general, the results of this study substantiate the importance of considering the occupational context in analyses of men's early retirement.
Bibliography Citation
Hayward, Mark D., William R. Grady and Melissa A. Hardy. "Occupational Consequences for Men's Early Retirement." report, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, 1985.
4. McLaughlin, Steven D.
Grady, William R.
Billy, John O. G.
Winges, Linda D.
The Effects of the Decision to Marry on the Consequences of Adolescent Pregnancy
Final Report, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Office of Adolescent Programs, Department of Health and Human Services, 1984
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Breastfeeding; Childbearing; Educational Attainment; Fertility; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Stability; Marital Status; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Racial Differences

Teenage parenthood has been linked to reduced education, marital instability, rapid subsequent childbearing, and health problems for the child. This research compares individuals who had a first live birth before age 20 for three marital status groups: those who married before becoming pregnant, those who married during the pregnancy and those who did not marry before the birth. The four outcomes considered are: education acquired after the birth, marital disruption, the timing of the second child, and the health of the infant. Black adolescent mothers are more likely to attend school after the birth than white adolescent mothers. Marriage before birth, either before pregnancy or while pregnant, reduces the probability of attaining more education after birth, and this negative impact of marriage is much stronger for blacks. Remaining unmarried at the birth increases the likelihood of the white teenager being with her family which, in turn, increases the likelihood of additional education. The timing of marriage and the likelihood of separation from their husbands in later years if they marry before the birth is also discussed in terms of black and white mothers. Intervals between first birth and second for those who marry either before or during the pregnancy or after birth are examined in terms of the two races. Baby birthweight and breastfeeding characteristics are examined. Birth outcomes and marriage timing are discussed in terms of the effects of marital status at first birth and how they vary by race. Because the proportion of all adolescent births that occur before marriage is increasing, these results have important implications for policy planners and program administrators. Additional data comes from Cycle 3 of the National Survey of Faculty Growth.
Bibliography Citation
McLaughlin, Steven D., William R. Grady, John O. G. Billy and Linda D. Winges. "The Effects of the Decision to Marry on the Consequences of Adolescent Pregnancy." Final Report, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Office of Adolescent Programs, Department of Health and Human Services, 1984.
5. McLaughlin, Steven D.
Grady, William R.
Herting, Jerald R.
Florey, Francesca A.
The Effects of the Decision to Marry on the Consequences of Adolescent Childbearing: Education, Income and Subsequent Fertility
Final Report, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, 1986
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Childbearing, Adolescent; Fertility; First Birth; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Wantedness; Well-Being

This report extends an earlier analysis of the consequences of adolescent childbearing (McLaughlin, et. al., 1985). It examines three primary issues: (1) how family and public sector support affected the completion of education; (2) how the economic well-being of teenage mothers is affected by the timing of marriage; and (3) the effect of marriage timing on the spacing and wantedness of the third birth. Using data from the 1979-1982 NLSY, this analysis found that while less than half of all adolescent mothers who became pregnant before completing high school were able to achieve a diploma within two years after the birth, those who remarried in the household of their parents after the birth were more likely to obtain their diploma than adolescent mothers who established separate living arrangements. Secondly, almost 40% of all white adolescent mothers and over two-thirds of all black adolescent mothers were in poverty one year after the birth. When the poverty status of those who marry prior to the birth is compared to the status of those not marrying before the birth, there appears to be an economic gain associated with marriage. However after controlling for the other factors affecting economic well- being, there is no remaining effect of marriage but the effects of living arrangements remain large and significant. Finally, marital status at first birth was found to significantly affect the timing of the third birth only among black women.
Bibliography Citation
McLaughlin, Steven D., William R. Grady, Jerald R. Herting and Francesca A. Florey. "The Effects of the Decision to Marry on the Consequences of Adolescent Childbearing: Education, Income and Subsequent Fertility." Final Report, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, 1986.