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Source: Behavior Genetics
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Cheung, Amanda K.
Harden, K. Paige
Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.
Gene x Environment Interactions in Early Externalizing Behaviors: Parental Emotional Support and Socioeconomic Context as Moderators of Genetic Influences?
Behavior Genetics 44,5 (September 2014): 468-486.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24980660
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Children, Behavioral Development; Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B, ECLS-K); Family Income; Genetics; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parental Influences; Siblings; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses longitudinal population-based samples of young siblings to examine the effects of two hypothesized moderators of early externalizing behaviors: parental emotional support and family socioeconomic status. The first sample, a twin sample from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), was composed of approximately 600 twin pairs measured on externalizing at ages 4 and 5. Results indicated stronger genetic influences on externalizing at lower levels of parental emotional support but higher levels of socioeconomic status; only the latter interaction remained significant when the two moderators were simultaneously modeled. These moderation effects were not replicated in our analyses of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement (CNLSY) data, which contained 1939 pairs of full and half siblings measured on externalizing at ages 4-5 and ages 6-7. Our results highlight the need for replication in quantitative behavior genetics research on externalizing behaviors. Potential causes for non-replication are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Cheung, Amanda K., K. Paige Harden and Elliot M. Tucker-Drob. "Gene x Environment Interactions in Early Externalizing Behaviors: Parental Emotional Support and Socioeconomic Context as Moderators of Genetic Influences?" Behavior Genetics 44,5 (September 2014): 468-486.
2. Ellingson, Jarrod M.
Goodnight, Jackson A.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Waldman, Irwin D.
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
A Sibling-Comparison Study of Smoking During Pregnancy and Childhood Psychological Traits
Behavior Genetics 44,1 (January 2014): 25-35.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10519-013-9618-6
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Mothers, Behavior; Mothers, Health; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Siblings; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Temperament

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prenatal exposure to substances of abuse is associated with numerous psychological problems in offspring, but quasi-experimental studies controlling for co-occurring risk factors suggest that familial factors (e.g., genetic and environmental effects shared among siblings) confound many associations with maternal smoking during pregnancy (SDP). Few of the quasi-experimental studies in this area have explored normative psychological traits in early childhood or developmental changes across the lifespan, however. The current study used multilevel growth curve models with a large, nationally-representative sample in the United States to investigate for potential effects of SDP on the developmental trajectories of cognitive functioning, temperament/personality, and disruptive behavior across childhood, while accounting for shared familial confounds by comparing differentially exposed siblings and statistically controlling for offspring-specific covariates. Maternal SDP predicted the intercept (but not change over time) for all cognitive and externalizing outcomes. Accounting for familial confounds, however, attenuated the association between SDP exposure and all outcomes, except the intercept (age 5) for reading recognition. These findings, which are commensurate with previous quasi-experimental research on more severe indices of adolescent and adult problems, suggest that the associations between SDP and developmental traits in childhood are due primarily to confounding factors and not a causal association.
Bibliography Citation
Ellingson, Jarrod M., Jackson A. Goodnight, Carol A. Van Hulle, Irwin D. Waldman and Brian M. D'Onofrio. "A Sibling-Comparison Study of Smoking During Pregnancy and Childhood Psychological Traits." Behavior Genetics 44,1 (January 2014): 25-35.
3. Goodnight, Jackson A.
Donahue, Kelly L
Waldman, Irwin D.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Rathouz, Paul J.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Associations between Infant Fussy Temperament and Antisocial Behavior in Childhood and Adolescence
Behavior Genetics 46,5 (September 2016): 680-692.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10519-016-9794-2
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Children, Temperament; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Genetics; Kinship; Modeling, Biometric; Modeling, Multilevel; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous research suggests that fussy temperament in infancy predicts risk for later antisocial behavior (ASB) in childhood and adolescence. It remains unclear, however, to what extent infant fussiness is related to later ASB through causal processes or if they both reflect the same family risk factors for ASB. The current study used two approaches, the comparison of siblings and bivariate biometric modeling, to reduce familial confounding and examine genetic and environmental influences on associations between fussiness in the first 2 years of life and ASB in childhood and late adolescence. Analyses were conducted on data from a prospective cohort (9237 at 4–9 years and 7034 at 14–17 years) who are the offspring of a nationally representative sample of US women. In the full sample, fussiness predicted both child and adolescent ASB to small but significant extents, controlling for a wide range of measured child and family-level covariates. When siblings who differed in their fussiness were compared, fussiness predicted ASB in childhood, but not ASB during adolescence. Furthermore, results from a bivariate Cholesky model suggested that even the association of fussiness with childhood ASB found when comparing siblings is attributable to familial factors. That is, although families with infants who are higher in fussiness also tend to have children and adolescents who engage in greater ASB, the hypothesis that infant fussiness has an environmentally mediated impact on the development of future ASB was not strongly supported.
Bibliography Citation
Goodnight, Jackson A., Kelly L Donahue, Irwin D. Waldman, Carol A. Van Hulle, Paul J. Rathouz, Benjamin B. Lahey and Brian M. D'Onofrio. "Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Associations between Infant Fussy Temperament and Antisocial Behavior in Childhood and Adolescence." Behavior Genetics 46,5 (September 2016): 680-692.
4. Hewitt, John
Behavior Genetics Association 36th Annual Meeting Abstracts
Behavior Genetics 36,6 (November 2006): 952-990.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/n5498752w1374106/
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Behavior; Genetics

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article presents abstracts of the 2006 Behavior Genetics Annual Meeting, Storrs, Connecticut, 20-25 June, 2006.
Abstracts that use the NLSY are:
  • BARD, DAVID E.: "Modeling Age-of-Onset in Behavior Genetic Substance Use Research: It's About Time?"
  • BARD and RODGERS, JOSEPH LEE: "Use of Discrete-Time Survival Analysis for Modeling Multivariate ACE Models of Fertility Precursors from the Children of the NLSY"; and
  • RODGERS, BARD, and MILLER, WARREN: "The Mother-Daughter-Aunt-Niece (MDAN) Design, Applied to Cross-Generational NLSY Fertility Variables"
The above abstracts are printed in citations included in this bibliography. Please search by Author(s) or Title.
Bibliography Citation
Hewitt, John. "Behavior Genetics Association 36th Annual Meeting Abstracts." Behavior Genetics 36,6 (November 2006): 952-990.
5. Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Bard, David E.
Johnson, Amber
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Miller, Warren B.
The Cross-Generational Mother–Daughter–Aunt–Niece Design: Establishing Validity of the MDAN Design with NLSY Fertility Variables
Behavior Genetics 38,6 (November 2008): 567-578.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/x75521h0l957w296/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Behavior; Fertility; Genetics; Inheritance; Kinship; Mothers and Daughters; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) fertility variables, we introduce and illustrate a new genetically-informative design. First, we develop a kinship linking algorithm, using the NLSY79 and the NLSY-Children data to link mothers to daughters and aunts to nieces. Then we construct mother–daughter correlations to compare to aunt–niece correlations, an MDAN design, within the context of the quantitative genetic model. The results of our empirical illustration, which uses DF Analysis and generalized estimation equations (GEE) to estimate biometrical parameters from NLSY79 sister–sister pairs and their children in the NLSY-Children dataset, provide both face validity and concurrent validity in support of the efficacy of the design. We describe extensions of the MDAN design. Compared to the typical within-generational design used in most behavior genetic research, the cross-generational feature of this design has certain advantages and interesting features. In particular, we note that the equal environment assumption of the traditional biometrical model shifts in the context of a cross-generational design. These shifts raise questions and provide motivation for future research using the MDAN and other cross-generational designs. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Rodgers, Joseph Lee, David E. Bard, Amber Johnson, Brian M. D'Onofrio and Warren B. Miller. "The Cross-Generational Mother–Daughter–Aunt–Niece Design: Establishing Validity of the MDAN Design with NLSY Fertility Variables." Behavior Genetics 38,6 (November 2008): 567-578.
6. Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Bard, David E.
Miller, Warren B.
Multivariate Cholesky Models of Human Female Fertility Patterns in the NLSY
Behavior Genetics 37,2 (March 2007): 345-361.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/mt8j270588g24168/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Fertility; Genetics; Life Course; Modeling, Multilevel; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Substantial evidence now exists that variables measuring or correlated with human fertility outcomes have a heritable component. In this study, we define a series of age-sequenced fertility variables, and fit multivariate models to account for underlying shared genetic and environmental sources of variance. We make predictions based on a theory developed by Udry [(1996) Biosocial models of low-fertility societies. In: Casterline, JB, Lee RD, Foote KA (eds) Fertility in the United States: new patterns, new theories. The Population Council, New York] suggesting that biological/genetic motivations can be more easily realized and measured in settings in which fertility choices are available. Udry's theory, along with principles from molecular genetics and certain tenets of life history theory, allow us to make specific predictions about biometrical patterns across age. Consistent with predictions, our results suggest that there are different sources of genetic influence on fertility variance at early compared to later ages, but that there is only one source of shared environmental influence that occurs at early ages. These patterns are suggestive of the types of gene–gene and gene–environment interactions for which we must account to better understand individual differences in fertility outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Rodgers, Joseph Lee, David E. Bard and Warren B. Miller. "Multivariate Cholesky Models of Human Female Fertility Patterns in the NLSY." Behavior Genetics 37,2 (March 2007): 345-361.
7. Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Beasley, William H.
Bard, David E.
Meredith, Kelly M.
Hunter, Michael D.
Johnson, Amber
Buster, Maury Allen
Li, Chengchang
The NLSY Kinship Links: Using the NLSY79 and NLSY-Children Data to Conduct Genetically-Informed and Family-Oriented Research
Behavior Genetics 46,4 (July 2016): 538-551.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10519-016-9785-3
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Data Quality/Consistency; Genetics; Height; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Kinship; Modeling, Multilevel; Siblings; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth datasets (NLSY79; NLSY-Children/Young Adults; NLSY97) have extensive family pedigree information contained within them. These data sources are based on probability sampling, a longitudinal design, and a cross-generational and within-family data structure, with hundreds of phenotypes relevant to behavior genetic (BG) researchers, as well as to other developmental and family researchers. These datasets provide a unique and powerful source of information for BG researchers. But much of the information required for biometrical modeling has been hidden, and has required substantial programming effort to uncover--until recently. Our research team has spent over 20 years developing kinship links to genetically inform biometrical modeling. In the most recent release of kinship links from two of the NLSY datasets, the direct kinship indicators included in the 2006 surveys allowed successful and unambiguous linking of over 94 % of the potential pairs. In this paper, we provide details for research teams interested in using the NLSY data portfolio to conduct BG (and other family-oriented) research.
Bibliography Citation
Rodgers, Joseph Lee, William H. Beasley, David E. Bard, Kelly M. Meredith, Michael D. Hunter, Amber Johnson, Maury Allen Buster and Chengchang Li. "The NLSY Kinship Links: Using the NLSY79 and NLSY-Children Data to Conduct Genetically-Informed and Family-Oriented Research." Behavior Genetics 46,4 (July 2016): 538-551.
8. Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Van Hulle, Carol A.
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Rathouz, Paul J.
Beasley, Will
Johnson, Amber
Waldman, Irwin D.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
Behavior Problems and Timing of Menarche: A Developmental Longitudinal Biometrical Analysis Using the NLSY-Children Data
Behavior Genetics 45,1 (January 2015): 51-70.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10519-014-9676-4
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Kinship; Menarche; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A powerful longitudinal data source, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Children data, allows measurement of behavior problems (BP) within a developmental perspective linking them to menarcheal timing (MT). In a preliminary analysis, we evaluate the bivariate relationships between BP measured at different developmental periods and the timing of menarche. Correlations were not consistent with any correlational/causal relationship between BP and MT. In the major part of our study, MT was used to moderate the developmental trajectory of BP, within a genetically-informed design. Girls reaching menarche early had behavior problem variance accounted for by the shared environment; those reaching menarche with average/late timing had behavior problem differences accounted for by genetic variance. Our findings match previous empirical results in important ways, and also extend those results. A theoretical interpretation is offered in relation to a theory linking genetic/shared environmental variance to flexibility and choices available within the family in relation to BP.
Bibliography Citation
Rodgers, Joseph Lee, Carol A. Van Hulle, Brian M. D'Onofrio, Paul J. Rathouz, Will Beasley, Amber Johnson, Irwin D. Waldman and Benjamin B. Lahey. "Behavior Problems and Timing of Menarche: A Developmental Longitudinal Biometrical Analysis Using the NLSY-Children Data." Behavior Genetics 45,1 (January 2015): 51-70.
9. Sujan, Ayesha C.
Rickert, Martin E.
Class, Quetzal
Coyne, Claire A.
Lichtenstein, Paul
Almqvist, Catarina
Larsson, Henrik
Sjölander, Arvid
Lahey, Benjamin B.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Waldman, Irwin D.
Öberg, A. Sara
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
A Genetically Informed Study of the Associations Between Maternal Age at Childbearing and Adverse Perinatal Outcomes
Behavior Genetics 46,3 (May 2016): 431-456.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10519-015-9748-0/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age at Birth; Alcohol Use; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birth Order; Birth Outcomes; Birthweight; Cross-national Analysis; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Genetics; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Kinship; Mothers, Health; Siblings; Substance Use; Sweden, Swedish

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We examined associations of maternal age at childbearing (MAC) with gestational age and fetal growth (i.e., birth weight adjusting for gestational age), using two genetically informed designs (cousin and sibling comparisons) and data from two cohorts, a population-based Swedish sample and a nationally representative United States sample. We also conducted sensitivity analyses to test limitations of the designs. The findings were consistent across samples and suggested that, associations observed in the population between younger MAC and shorter gestational age were confounded by shared familial factors; however, associations of advanced MAC with shorter gestational age remained robust after accounting for shared familial factors. In contrast to the gestational age findings, neither early nor advanced MAC was associated with lower fetal growth after accounting for shared familial factors. Given certain assumptions, these findings provide support for a causal association between advanced MAC and shorter gestational age. The results also suggest that there are not causal associations between early MAC and shorter gestational age, between early MAC and lower fetal growth, and between advanced MAC and lower fetal growth.
Bibliography Citation
Sujan, Ayesha C., Martin E. Rickert, Quetzal Class, Claire A. Coyne, Paul Lichtenstein, Catarina Almqvist, Henrik Larsson, Arvid Sjölander, Benjamin B. Lahey, Carol A. Van Hulle, Irwin D. Waldman, A. Sara Öberg and Brian M. D'Onofrio. "A Genetically Informed Study of the Associations Between Maternal Age at Childbearing and Adverse Perinatal Outcomes." Behavior Genetics 46,3 (May 2016): 431-456.