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Source: Centre for Economic Policy Research, ANU
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Beltran, Daniel O.
Das, Kuntal Kumar
Fairlie, Robert W.
Are Computers Good for Children? The Effects of Home Computers on Educational Outcomes
Discussion Papers: 576, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University, 2008.
Also: http://www.cbe.anu.edu.au/research/papers/ceprdpapers/DP576.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Centre for Economic Policy Research, ANU
Keyword(s): Computer Ownership; Computer Use; Crime; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Educational Returns; High School Completion/Graduates; Home Environment; Modeling, Fixed Effects

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although computers are universal in the classroom, nearly twenty million children in the United States do not have computers in their homes. Surprisingly, only a few previous studies explore the role of home computers in the educational process. Home computers might be very useful for completing school assignments, but they might also represent a distraction for teenagers. We use several identification strategies and panel data from the two main U.S. datasets that include recent information on computer ownership among children--the 2000-2003 CPS Computer and Internet Use Supplements (CIUS) matched to the CPS Basic Monthly Files and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997--to explore the causal relationship between computer ownership and high school graduation and other educational outcomes. Teenagers who have access to home computers are 6 to 8 percentage points more likely to graduate from high school than teenagers who do not have home computers after controlling for individual, parental, and family characteristics. We generally find evidence of positive relationships between home computers and educational outcomes using several identification strategies, including controlling for typically unobservable home environment and extracurricular activities in the NLSY97, fixed effects models, instrumental variables, and including future computer ownership and falsification tests. Home computers may increase high school graduation by reducing non-productive activities, such as truancy and crime, among children in addition to making it easier to complete school assignments.
Bibliography Citation
Beltran, Daniel O., Kuntal Kumar Das and Robert W. Fairlie. "Are Computers Good for Children? The Effects of Home Computers on Educational Outcomes." Discussion Papers: 576, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University, 2008.
2. Gregory, Robert George
Karmel, Tom
Youth in the Eighties: Papers from the Australian Longitudinal Survey Research Project
Canberra, Australia: Centre for Economic Policy Research, 1992.
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: Centre for Economic Policy Research, ANU
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Australia, Australian; Australian Youth Survey (AYS); Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA); Cross-national Analysis; Education; Gender; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Household Composition; Job Training; Labor Market Demographics; Longitudinal Surveys; Marital Status; NLS Description; Racial Studies; Transition, School to Work; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The Australian Youth Survey (AYS) is a longitudinal survey program based on annual interviews with a cohort of young people aged 16-19 in 1989, with a new sample of 16 year olds added each year from 1990-1994.

The survey aims mainly at providing data on the dynamics of the youth labour market, and in particular to address questions which are not readily covered with available sources of cross-sectional data. Labour market topics include detailed work history, job search behaviour, job training and experience with the Commonwealth Employment Service. Other topics related to the main labour market theme include secondary schooling and retention to Year 12, career advice, post-secondary education and qualifications, transition from school/study to work, health, housing and financial conditions.

Basic demographic variables include age, sex, marital status, size of household, country of birth, racial origin, parental education and occupation, religion, income, and area of residence. (© Social Science Data Archives, Research School of Social Sciences, The Australian National University.)

Bibliography Citation
Gregory, Robert George and Tom Karmel. Youth in the Eighties: Papers from the Australian Longitudinal Survey Research Project. Canberra, Australia: Centre for Economic Policy Research, 1992..
3. Pergamit, Michael R.
Some Recent Governmental Uses of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) in the USA
In: Youth in the Eighties: Papers from the Australian Longitudinal Survey Research Project. R.G. Gregory and T. Karmel, eds. Canberra, Australia: Department of Employment, Education and Training & Centre for Economic Policy Research, Australian National University, 1992.
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: Centre for Economic Policy Research, ANU
Keyword(s): Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA); Demography; Hispanics; NLS Description

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of this paper is to give some recent examples of uses of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) by the United States government. The National Longitudinal Surveys were begun in the mid 1960s with the drawing of four samples: Young Men who were 14-24 years old in 1966, Young Women who were 14-24 years old in 1968, Older Men who were 4559 years old in 1966, and Mature Women who were 30-44 years old in 1967. Each sample originally had about 5000 individuals with oversamples of blacks. In the early 1980s, the Young Men and Older Men surveys were discontinued. The two women's surveys continue and are currently on a biannual interview cycle. The interviews and retention rates for each of these original cohorts are found in Table 1. In 1979, a new cohort was begun with a sample of over 12 000 young men and women who were 14-21 years of age on 1 January 1979. It included oversamples of blacks, Hispanics, economically disadvantaged whites, and youth in the military. This survey whi ch we call the Youth Cohort, or NLSY, has been interviewed every year since it began. After eleven waves of interviewing, we had a retention rate of 91.4 per cent of the original sample, probably the highest retention rate of any longitudinal survey after such a long time. We are now completing our twelfth wave of interviewing and as of 24 November 1990, we have completed interviews with 88.1 per cent of the original sample with about two weeks remaining in the field period. Retention rates by year for the NLSY are found in Table 2. The NLS program was originally begun by the Office of Manpower Policy, Evaluation, and Research of the United States Department of Labor. This agency was combined with others to form the Employment and Training Administration where the NLS was administered through 1986. The NLSY, in particular, was begun in order to evaluate the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act. Over time the NLS developed into a more general purpose data set for the study of labor market behavior. It was determined that it fit better into the mission of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and was transferred to BLS in October 1986. In the four years BLS has overseen the NLS program, we have been developing a multi-dimensional approach toward regular usage of the data.
Bibliography Citation
Pergamit, Michael R. "Some Recent Governmental Uses of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) in the USA" In: Youth in the Eighties: Papers from the Australian Longitudinal Survey Research Project. R.G. Gregory and T. Karmel, eds. Canberra, Australia: Department of Employment, Education and Training & Centre for Economic Policy Research, Australian National University, 1992.