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Source: Child: Care, Health and Development
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Goldfarb, Samantha S.
Locher, Julie L.
Preskitt, Julie K.
Becker, David J.
Davies, Susan
Sen, Bisakha
Associations between Participation in Family Activities and Adolescent School Problems
Child: Care, Health and Development 43,3 (May 2017): 361-368.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cch.12434/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Activities; Adolescent Behavior; Educational Attainment; Family Environment; Grade Point Average (GPA)/Grades; School Suspension/Expulsion; Siblings

Introduction: Adolescent risk outcomes related to school issues are widespread, with about 20% parents reporting poor school engagement amongst their youth. Previous literature suggests that adolescents who report strong bonds with their parents are often identified as being less likely to engage in risky behaviours, such as substance use. The current study sought to examine the association between the frequencies of selected family activities and school problems amongst adolescents after adjustments for family connectedness and other characteristics.

Methods: Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997. Of the 8984 youth interviewed, 3855 also had a sibling interviewed who met the selection criteria. School problem outcomes measured were suspension occurrence, poor grades and highest grade completed low for age. Independent variables of interest were self-reported frequency of family dinner, fun and religious activities in a typical week. Multivariable logistic models were estimated for each outcome, and multivariable linear probability models were estimated adjusting for family fixed effects.

Results: Adjusting for family connectedness, there were significant associations between certain family activities and adolescent school problem measures. However, these results did not remain significant in models with family fixed effects, suggesting that associations could be driven by family-level confounders.

Discussion: This study did not find strong evidence of a protective relationship between family activities and school problems. Therefore, it suggested that programme and policymakers be cautious in overstating the importance of family activities in preventing adolescent risk outcomes until true causal relationships can be determined.

Bibliography Citation
Goldfarb, Samantha S., Julie L. Locher, Julie K. Preskitt, David J. Becker, Susan Davies and Bisakha Sen. "Associations between Participation in Family Activities and Adolescent School Problems." Child: Care, Health and Development 43,3 (May 2017): 361-368.
2. Mehmet-Radji, Ozlem
Early Television Exposure and Subsequent Attentional Problems in Children
Child: Care, Health & Development 30,5 (September 2004): 559-561.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,uid&db=aph&an=14228391
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Television Viewing

Cross-sectional research has suggested that television viewing may be associated with decreased attention spans in children. However, longitudinal data of early television exposure and subsequent attentional problems have been lacking. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that early television exposure (at ages 1 and 3) is associated with attentional problems at age 7. We used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a representative longitudinal data set. Our main outcome was the hyperactivity subscale of the Behavioural Problems Index determined on all participants at age 7. Children who were > 1.2 standard deviations above the mean were classified as having attentional problems. Our main predictor was hours of television watched daily at ages 1 and 3 years. Data were available for 1278 children at age 1 and 1345 children at age 3. Ten percent of children had attentional problems at age 7. In a logistic regression model, hours of television viewing per day at both ages 1 and 3 were associated with attentional problems at age 7 [1.09 (1.03--1.15) and 1.09 (1.02--1.16), respectively]. Early television exposure is associated with attentional problems at age 7. Efforts to limit television viewing in early childhood may be warranted, and additional research is needed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Mehmet-Radji, Ozlem. "Early Television Exposure and Subsequent Attentional Problems in Children." Child: Care, Health & Development 30,5 (September 2004): 559-561.
3. Reading, Richard
Effect of Breast Feeding on Intelligence in Children: Prospective Study, Sibling Pairs Analysis, and Meta-Analysis
Child: Care, Health and Development 33,1 (January 2007): 110-111.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2214.2006.00723_5.x/full
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Breastfeeding; Cognitive Ability; I.Q.; Intelligence Tests; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Objective To assess the importance of maternal intelligence, and the effect of controlling for it and other important confounders, in the link between breastfeeding and children's intelligence. Design Examination of the effect of breastfeeding on cognitive ability and the impact of a range of potential confounders, in particular maternal IQ, within a national database. Additional analyses compared pairs of siblings from the sample who were and were not breastfed. The results are considered in the context of other studies that have also controlled for parental intelligence via meta-analysis. Setting 1979 US national longitudinal survey of youth. Subjects Data on 5475 children, the offspring of 3161 mothers in the longitudinal survey. Main outcome measure IQ in children measured by Peabody individual achievement test. Results The mother's IQ was more highly predictive of breastfeeding status than were her race, education, age, poverty status, smoking, the home environment, or the child's birthweight or birth order. One standard deviation advantage in maternal IQ more than doubled the odds of breastfeeding. Before adjustment, breastfeeding was associated with an increase of around 4 points in mental ability. Adjustment for maternal intelligence accounted for most of this effect. When fully adjusted for a range of relevant confounders, the effect was small (0.52) and non-significant (95% confidence interval −0.19 to 1.23). The results of the sibling comparisons and meta-analysis corroborated these findings. Conclusions Breastfeeding has little or no effect on intelligence in children. While breastfeeding has many advantages for the child and mother, enhancement of the child's intelligence is unlikely to be among them. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Reading, Richard. "Effect of Breast Feeding on Intelligence in Children: Prospective Study, Sibling Pairs Analysis, and Meta-Analysis." Child: Care, Health and Development 33,1 (January 2007): 110-111.