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Source: Community, Work and Family
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Baird, Chardie L.
Burge, Stephanie
Family-friendly Benefits and Full-time Working Mothers' Labor Force Persistence
Community, Work and Family 21,2 (March 2018): 168-192.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13668803.2018.1428173
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; First Birth; Labor Force Participation; Maternal Employment

Family-friendly benefits are intended to help mothers balance rather than juggle work and family. Prior research assumes that family-friendly benefits have a similar effect on mothers' persistence in full-time work across parity. However, there is evidence that the transitions to first-time and second-time motherhood are qualitatively, as well as quantitatively, different experiences. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), we investigate women's labor force status (full-time, part-time, and not working) after both parity transitions among women who were working in the labor force full-time prior to the birth of their first child. We find that mothers often persist in the same labor force status after the birth of their second child that they held after the birth of their first child, but there is wide variability in labor force and parity pathways. In addition, a wider array of family-friendly benefits is associated with second-time mothers' full-time work than first-time mothers.
Bibliography Citation
Baird, Chardie L. and Stephanie Burge. "Family-friendly Benefits and Full-time Working Mothers' Labor Force Persistence." Community, Work and Family 21,2 (March 2018): 168-192.
2. Heymann, S. Jody
Earle, Alison
The Impact of Parental Working Conditions on School-Age Children: The Case of Evening Work
Community, Work & Family 4,3 (December 2001): 305-325.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01405110120089369
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Company ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Child Development; Child Health; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Poverty; Work Hours; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data collected in the US in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth was used to examine the effect of parental evening work on the home environment for 1,133 school children (aged 5-10 yrs). The Home Observation Measurement of the Environment (HOME) score was used to predict the child's school, developmental, and health outcomes. Results show that at least one parent working in the evening had a significantly negative effect on the home environment both for families living in poverty and those who were not living in poverty. The effect size, an 11% decrease in HOME scores when mothers worked evenings and an 8% decrease in HOME scores when fathers worked evenings, was the same order of magnitude as living in poverty. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2000 APA, all rights reserved):
Bibliography Citation
Heymann, S. Jody and Alison Earle. "The Impact of Parental Working Conditions on School-Age Children: The Case of Evening Work." Community, Work & Family 4,3 (December 2001): 305-325.