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Source: Department of Economics, University of Texas at Austin
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Oettinger, Gerald S.
Does the Sibling Correlation in Economic Status Vary Across Families and Sibling Pairs?
Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Texas at Austin, April 25, 1999.
Also: http://www.nber.org/~confer/99/lssi99/oetti.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Texas at Austin
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Cognitive Ability; Educational Attainment; Family Background; Family Environment; Pairs (also see Siblings); Siblings; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to estimate sibling correlations in educational attainment and cognitive ability and to investigate whether these correlations vary systematically with family or sibling pair characteristics. Similar to previous authors, I estimate raw sibling correlations of .46-.57 for educational attainment and .62-.67 for cognitive ability and I find that observable differences in family background between families can account for less than half of these correlations. An analysis of the residual sibling correlations in status shows that the degree of sibling resemblance varies systematically with characteristics of the family and the sibling pair. In particular, sibling correlations in status appears to be U-shaped in father's education (a proxy for family permanent income), implying that siblings from middle income families have less similar outcomes than siblings from both rich and poor families. There is also some evidence that the sibling correlation in status is smaller for siblings far apart in age, which suggests that time-varying components of family environment have a non-trivial impact on eventual socioeconomic status.
Bibliography Citation
Oettinger, Gerald S. "Does the Sibling Correlation in Economic Status Vary Across Families and Sibling Pairs?" Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Texas at Austin, April 25, 1999.
2. Petre, Melinda C. A.
Essays on the Impact of Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills on Labor Market Outcomes
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of Texas, 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Texas at Austin
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); CESD (Depression Scale); Employment, History; Labor Market Outcomes; Motivation; Noncognitive Skills; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Analyzing the distributions of wages for whites, blacks and Hispanics reveals the existence of a wage gap throughout the distribution. There are also clear cognitive and noncognitive skill differences across groups. Do differences in the distributions of these skills explain differences in the distributions of wages? Do predicted distributions of wages resulting from rewarding blacks and Hispanics as if they were white help explain the observed wage gap? Using data from the NLSY79, I look at the impacts of noncognitive skills on wages for blacks, Hispanics and whites. I estimate the entire distribution of wages conditional on skills for blacks and Hispanics to see if there is a difference in wages individuals with the same level of cognitive and noncognitive skills. I find that all cognitive and noncognitive measures examined are important in explaining the wage penalty paid by blacks and Hispanics and that, for blacks, predicting their wages conditional on skills approximates the distribution of actual wages.
Bibliography Citation
Petre, Melinda C. A. Essays on the Impact of Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills on Labor Market Outcomes. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of Texas, 2014.