Search Results

Source: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Duckworth, Jennifer C.
Doran, Kelly A.
Waldron, Mary
Childhood Weight Status and Timing of First Substance Use in an Ethnically Diverse Sample
Drug and Alcohol Dependence 164 (1 July 2016): 172-178.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871616301119
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Growth; Child Health; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Drug Use; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Racial Differences; Substance Use; Weight

Background: We examined associations between weight status during childhood and timing of first cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use in an ethnically diverse sample.

Methods: Data were drawn from child respondents of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, including 1,448 Hispanic, 2,126 non-Hispanic Black, and 3,304 non-Hispanic, non-Black (White) respondents aged 10 years and older as of last assessment. Cox proportional hazards regression was conducted predicting age at first use from weight status (obese, overweight, and underweight relative to healthy weight) assessed at ages 7/8, separately by substance class, sex, and race/ethnicity. Tests of interactions between weight status and respondent sex and race/ethnicity were also conducted.

Results: Compared to healthy-weight females of the same race/ethnicity, overweight Hispanic females were at increased likelihood of alcohol and marijuana use and overweight White females were at increased likelihood of cigarette and marijuana use. Compared to healthy-weight males of the same race/ethnicity, obese White males were at decreased likelihood of cigarette and alcohol use and underweight Hispanic and Black males were at decreased likelihood of alcohol and marijuana use. Significant differences in associations by sex and race/ethnicity were observed in tests of interactions.

Conclusions: Findings highlight childhood weight status as a predictor of timing of first substance use among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black and White female and male youth. Results suggest that collapsing across sex and race/ethnicity, a common practice in prior research, may obscure important within-group patterns of associations and thus may be of limited utility for informing preventive and early intervention efforts.

Bibliography Citation
Duckworth, Jennifer C., Kelly A. Doran and Mary Waldron. "Childhood Weight Status and Timing of First Substance Use in an Ethnically Diverse Sample." Drug and Alcohol Dependence 164 (1 July 2016): 172-178.
2. Fendrich, Michael
Kim, Julia Yun Soo
Multiwave Analysis of Retest Artifact in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Drug Use
Drug and Alcohol Dependence 62,3 (May 2001): 239-253.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871600001770
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Interviewer Characteristics; Interviewing Method; Marital Status; Racial Differences

We examined follow-up data from surveys in 1988, 1992 and 1994 in order to estimate the prevalence and explore the correlates of retest artifact (denial) of drug use among National Longitudinal Survey of Youth respondents who disclosed lifetime cocaine or marijuana use in 1984. In the cocaine use cohort, 42% denied lifetime cocaine use during at least one follow-up wave. In the marijuana use cohort, about 29% denied lifetime marijuana use during at least one follow-up wave. Denial either leveled off (cocaine) or diminished (marijuana) between the second and third follow-up interviews. The most consistent predictors of denial in both longitudinal and cross-sectional models and across substances were race/ethnicity (black informants had increased rates of denial) and marital status (married respondents had increased rates of denial). Other predictors of denial included interviewer characteristics (social attribution), interview mode, and drug salience. The findings with respect to marijuana reporting trends parallel increased willingness of public officials to retrospectively disclose this behavior in the popular press.
Bibliography Citation
Fendrich, Michael and Julia Yun Soo Kim. "Multiwave Analysis of Retest Artifact in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Drug Use." Drug and Alcohol Dependence 62,3 (May 2001): 239-253.
3. Kandel, Denise B.
Griesler, Pamela C.
Schaffran, Christine
Educational Attainment and Smoking among Women: Risk Factors and Consequences for Offspring
Drug and Alcohol Dependence 104,Supplement_1 (October 2009): S24-S33.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T63-4VGDNPK-1&_user=10&_coverDate=10%2F01%2F2009&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=e959fe8aa16fa78f2d36f0827791f010&searchtype=a
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Addiction; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; CESD (Depression Scale); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Behavioral Development; Depression (see also CESD); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); Pre/post Natal Behavior; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Variables, Independent - Covariate; Women's Education

We examine the association between education and smoking by women in the population, including smoking during pregnancy, and identify risk factors for smoking and the consequences of smoking in pregnancy for children's smoking and behavioral problems. Secondary analyses of four national data sets were implemented: The National Survey of Drug Use and Health (2006), the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979-2004); the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health (Wave III); National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2006). The lower the level of education, the greater the risk of being a current smoker, smoking daily, smoking heavily, being nicotine dependent, starting to smoke at an early age, having higher levels of circulating cotinine per cigarettes smoked, and continuing to smoke in pregnancy. The educational gradient is especially strong in pregnancy. Educational level and smoking in pregnancy independently increase the risk of offspring smoking and antisocial and anxious/depressed behavior problems. These effects persist with control for other covariates, except maternal age at child's birth, which accounts for the impact of education on offspring smoking and anxious/depressed behavior problems. Women with low education should be the target of public health efforts toward reducing tobacco use. These efforts need to focus as much on social conditions that affect women's lives as on individual level interventions. These interventions would have beneficial effects not only for the women themselves but also for their offspring.
Bibliography Citation
Kandel, Denise B., Pamela C. Griesler and Christine Schaffran. "Educational Attainment and Smoking among Women: Risk Factors and Consequences for Offspring." Drug and Alcohol Dependence 104,Supplement_1 (October 2009): S24-S33.
4. Mulia, Nina
Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J.
Witbrodt, Jane
Bond, Jason
Williams, Edwina
Zemore, Sarah E.
Racial/Ethnic Differences in 30-year Trajectories of Heavy Drinking in a Nationally Representative U.S. Sample
Drug and Alcohol Dependence 170 (1 January 2017): 133-141.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871616309826
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Ethnic Differences; Life Course; Racial Differences

Background: Racial/ethnic minorities bear a disproportionate burden of alcohol-related problems in the U.S. It is unknown whether this reflects harmful patterns of lifecourse heavy drinking. Prior research shows little support for the latter but has been limited to young samples. We examine racial/ethnic differences in heavy drinking trajectories from ages 21 to 51.

Methods: Data on heavy drinking (6+ drinks/occasion) are from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 9,468), collected between 1982 and 2012. Sex-stratified, generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to model heavy drinking frequency trajectories as a function of age with a cubic curve, and interactions of race with age terms were tested to assess racial/ethnic differences. Models adjusted for time-varying socioeconomic status and marital and parenting status; predictors of trajectories were examined in race- and sex-specific models.

Results: White men and women had similarly steep declines in heavy drinking frequency throughout the 20s, contrasting with slower declines (and lower peaks) in Black and Hispanic men and women. During the 30s there was a Hispanic-White crossover in men's heavy drinking curves, and a Black-White female crossover among lifetime heavy drinkers; by age 51, racial/ethnic group trajectories converged in both sexes. Greater education was protective for all groups.

Bibliography Citation
Mulia, Nina, Katherine J. Karriker-Jaffe, Jane Witbrodt, Jason Bond, Edwina Williams and Sarah E. Zemore. "Racial/Ethnic Differences in 30-year Trajectories of Heavy Drinking in a Nationally Representative U.S. Sample." Drug and Alcohol Dependence 170 (1 January 2017): 133-141.
5. Shillington, Audrey M.
Clapp, John D.
Self-Report Stability of Adolescent Substance Use: Are There Differences for Gender, Ethnicity, and Age?
Drug and Alcohol Dependence 60,1 (July 2000): 19-27.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871600800046
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Drug Use; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Hispanics; Substance Use

This study used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and is the first to examine a 2-year report stability of substance use among adolescents while stratifying for gender, ethnicity, and age. This study examined lifetime use and age at onset report stability, and the internal consistency of reports while excluding nonusers and incident cases (respondents who may have initiated substance use between the two reporting periods) from the analyses. Report agreement of lifetime use for each substance was over 80% and was highest among alcohol users and lowest for cigarette and marijuana users. Report agreement was higher for female compared to male cigarette users. External consistency of lifetime use of cigarettes and marijuana was higher for whites compared to Hispanic or African American adolescents. Internal consistency was high but lifetime use reports were more stable than age at onset reports.

NOTE: The sample consists of children of the NLSY79 who responded to both the Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS) in 1992 and the Young Adult questionnaire in 1994.

Bibliography Citation
Shillington, Audrey M. and John D. Clapp. "Self-Report Stability of Adolescent Substance Use: Are There Differences for Gender, Ethnicity, and Age?" Drug and Alcohol Dependence 60,1 (July 2000): 19-27.
6. Shillington, Audrey M.
Roesch, Scott C.
Clapp, John D.
Woodruff, Susan I.
Typologies of Recanting of Lifetime Cigarette, Alcohol And Marijuana Use During a Six-Year Longitudinal Panel Study
Drug and Alcohol Dependence 118,2-3 (1 November 2011): 134-140.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871611001359
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Drug Use; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Self-Reporting

AIM: To identify if there are different typologies for adolescent self-reporters and recanters for alcohol, cigarette and marijuana use.

METHODS: This study is a secondary data analysis and utilized four waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth child panel data. The study included adolescents aged ten and older who self-reported ever use of cigarettes (n=872), marijuana (n=854) or alcohol (n=837). Consistent responders were those who reported lifetime use of a specific substance and continued to report such use at each latter wave of data collection. Latent class analyses were utilized to investigate if there are different types of self-reporters for each substance class.

RESULTS: Three unique groups for each substance was identified. The first group of users, who had a late age of onset, tended to be consistent self-reporters across waves. Those who were early onset users of cigarettes and marijuana tended to recant their use while early onset alcohol users were consistent reporters. Those with moderate ages of onset had no consistent recanting patterns. The highest degree of recanting was found among the early onset marijuana users.

CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that youth who begin their use at an earlier age may not be as reliable reporters as youth who initiate use at later ages. Our results suggest that the veracity of prevalence estimates for licit and illicit substances could be different depending on the age of the respondent.
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Bibliography Citation
Shillington, Audrey M., Scott C. Roesch, John D. Clapp and Susan I. Woodruff. "Typologies of Recanting of Lifetime Cigarette, Alcohol And Marijuana Use During a Six-Year Longitudinal Panel Study." Drug and Alcohol Dependence 118,2-3 (1 November 2011): 134-140.