Search Results

Source: Economics Letters
Resulting in 22 citations.
1. Astorne-Figari, Carmen
Speer, Jamin D.
Drop Out, Switch Majors, or Persist? The Contrasting Gender Gaps
Economics Letters 164 (March 2018): 82-85.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176518300107
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Dropouts; College Enrollment; College Graduates; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Gender Differences; STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics)

Men and women respond differently to early-college struggles. Men are more likely than women to drop out of college, while women are more likely to switch majors. These effects offset so that there is no gender gap in the probability of graduating in one's initial major choice. For students who begin in STEM majors, however, women are far less likely to graduate in the field, driven by the fact that they are twice as likely to switch majors. We find no evidence that women are more sensitive to poor academic performance in the switching or dropout decisions.
Bibliography Citation
Astorne-Figari, Carmen and Jamin D. Speer. "Drop Out, Switch Majors, or Persist? The Contrasting Gender Gaps." Economics Letters 164 (March 2018): 82-85.
2. Bailey, James
Who Pays for Obesity? Evidence from Health Insurance Benefit Mandates
Economics Letters 121,2 (November 2013): 287-289.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176513004023
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Insurance, Health; Obesity; State-Level Data/Policy; Wages

Is there an obesity externality? In the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, many state governments began requiring health insurance plans to cover treatments for diabetes. Using difference-in-difference analysis of restricted geocode data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to compare wages across states with and without diabetes mandates, I find that obese people pay for all of their own increased health costs in the form of lower wages, rather than passing them on to employers, insurers, and co-workers.
Bibliography Citation
Bailey, James. "Who Pays for Obesity? Evidence from Health Insurance Benefit Mandates." Economics Letters 121,2 (November 2013): 287-289.
3. Bratsberg, Bernt
Turunen, Jarkko
Wage Curve Evidence from Panel Data
Economics Letters 51,3 (June 1996): 345-353.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/016517659600818X
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Local Labor Market; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Regions; Wage Equations

We examine the US wage curve using longitudinal micro data. Results support the wage curve. but are sensitive to inclusion of regional and/or personal fixed effects. We find that hourly wages are less responsive to local unemployment than annual earnings.
Bibliography Citation
Bratsberg, Bernt and Jarkko Turunen. "Wage Curve Evidence from Panel Data." Economics Letters 51,3 (June 1996): 345-353.
4. Curme, Michael
Stefanec, Noah
Worker Quality and Labor Market Sorting
Economics Letters 96,2 (August 2007): 202-208.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176507000109
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Workers Ability

We test the hypothesis that labor market sorting into outcomes normally associated with wage premia (e.g. incentive pay coverage, urban dwelling, employment in large firms, marriage, and union coverage) is related to a series of non-standard worker "quality" measures.
Bibliography Citation
Curme, Michael and Noah Stefanec. "Worker Quality and Labor Market Sorting." Economics Letters 96,2 (August 2007): 202-208.
5. Ewing, Bradley T.
Athletes and Work
Economics Letters 59,1 (April 1998): 113-117.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176598000068
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Athletics (see SPORTS); High School; Labor Market Outcomes; Sports (also see ATHLETICS); Unions

The paper has added to the literature by providing new empirical evidence on the labor market effects of participating in high school athletics using the 1990 wave of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY) data set which allowed us to examine several measures of work attainment and provided a rich set of control variables. The major finding of this study is that former high school athletes are more likely to be in jobs that are associated with better labor market outcomes than their nonathlete counterparts. Copyright: Elsevier Science S. A.
Bibliography Citation
Ewing, Bradley T. "Athletes and Work." Economics Letters 59,1 (April 1998): 113-117.
6. Ewing, Bradley T.
Wages and Performance-Based Pay: Evidence from the NLSY
Economics Letters 51,2 (May 1996): 241-246.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/016517659500775X
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Benefits; Benefits, Fringe; Human Capital; Labor Economics; Modeling; Occupational Choice; Performance pay; Training, On-the-Job; Wage Determination

The link between performance and pay should be strongest where performance is more accurately observed, Brown ("Industrial and Labor Relations Review," 1990, 43, 1655-1825; "RAND Journal of Economics," 1992, 23, 366-75). More productive workers self-select into jobs with performance-based pay. Consequently, workers whose pay is based on performance should earn more than those whose pay is not based on such measures. This paper adds to the literature on the subject by providing new empirical evidence for Brown's model using the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY) data.
Bibliography Citation
Ewing, Bradley T. "Wages and Performance-Based Pay: Evidence from the NLSY." Economics Letters 51,2 (May 1996): 241-246.
7. Ghimire, Keshar Mani
Maclean, Johanna Catherine
Economic Conditions at School-leaving and Self-employment
Economics Letters 137 (December 2015): 154-156.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176515004498
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Economic Changes/Recession; Geocoded Data; Life Course; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Schooling; Self-Employed Workers; State-Level Data/Policy

In this study we use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to estimate the impact of economic conditions at school-leaving on self-employment across the lifecourse. We find no evidence that the economic conditions at school-leaving affect self-employment.
Bibliography Citation
Ghimire, Keshar Mani and Johanna Catherine Maclean. "Economic Conditions at School-leaving and Self-employment." Economics Letters 137 (December 2015): 154-156.
8. Hoffman, Emily P.
Economic Progress of Black Women
Economics Letters 6,2 (1980): 191-195.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0165176580900798
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Discrimination, Sex; Earnings; Household Income; Racial Differences; Sex Roles; Well-Being

This study uses data for the NLS Young and Mature Women. While black women are much closer to earnings parity with white women than is true for black relative to white men, such a comparison is misleading since it ignores maximization of utility (including leisure) by households (not individuals) and sex discrimination. Earnings are closer to parity than are hourly wage rates because black women supply more labor than white women. It is utility parity for households, not earnings parity for individuals, which gives a clear measure of well-being for blacks relative to whites.
Bibliography Citation
Hoffman, Emily P. "Economic Progress of Black Women." Economics Letters 6,2 (1980): 191-195.
9. Hudson, John
Sessions, John G.
Parental Education, Labor Market Experience and Earnings: New Wine in an Old Bottle?
Economics Letters 113, 2 (November 2011): 112-115.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176511002308
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Earnings; Labor Force Participation; Parental Influences

Evidence from US data suggests that increases in parental education significantly steepen the slope of male experience–earnings profiles during early career years, other things equal.
Bibliography Citation
Hudson, John and John G. Sessions. "Parental Education, Labor Market Experience and Earnings: New Wine in an Old Bottle?" Economics Letters 113, 2 (November 2011): 112-115.
10. Jianakoplos, Nancy Ammon
Menchik, Paul L.
Irvine, F. Owen
Saving Behavior of Older Households: Rate-of-Return, Precautionary and Inheritance Effects
Economics Letters 50 (1996): 111-121.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0165176595007202
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Inheritance; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Life Cycle Research; Retirement; Savings; Transfers, Family

We estimate a model of household saving behavior using data from a panel of men nearing retirement age. We seek and find statistically significant rate-of-return, precautionary and intergenerational-transfer effects embedded within a retirement-consumption life-cycle model. Copyright 1996 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Jianakoplos, Nancy Ammon, Paul L. Menchik and F. Owen Irvine. "Saving Behavior of Older Households: Rate-of-Return, Precautionary and Inheritance Effects." Economics Letters 50 (1996): 111-121.
11. Johnston, David W.
Physical Appearance and Wages: Do Blondes Have More Fun?
Economics Letters 108,1 (July 2010): 10-12.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016517651000114X
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Husbands, Income; Physical Characteristics; Wages, Women

This study contributes to the economics literature that links physical characteristics to labour market outcomes, by investigating the influence of hair colour on women's own wages and also their spouse's wages. Using U.S. panel data, we find that blonde women receive large wage premiums.
Bibliography Citation
Johnston, David W. "Physical Appearance and Wages: Do Blondes Have More Fun?" Economics Letters 108,1 (July 2010): 10-12.
12. Jolly, Nicholas A.
Phelan, Brian J.
Job Displacement's Long-run Effect on Access to Employer-provided Health Insurance and other Fringe Benefits
Economics Letters 130 (May 2015): 100-104.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176515001032
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Displaced Workers; Insurance, Health; Unemployment

This paper investigates the effect of job displacement on access to employer-provided fringe benefits. We find that displacement is associated with lost access to all seven employer-provided benefits investigated. These losses increase the cost of displacement by 10% per year.
Bibliography Citation
Jolly, Nicholas A. and Brian J. Phelan. "Job Displacement's Long-run Effect on Access to Employer-provided Health Insurance and other Fringe Benefits." Economics Letters 130 (May 2015): 100-104.
13. Light, Audrey L.
Omori, Yoshiaki
Fixed Effects Maximum Likelihood Estimation of a Flexibly Parametric Proportional Hazard Model with an Application to Job Exits
Economics Letters 116,2 (August 2012): 236-239.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176512000869
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Education; Employment; Job Tenure; Job Turnover; Mobility, Job; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration

We extend the fixed effects maximum likelihood estimator to a proportional hazard model with a flexibly parametric baseline hazard. We use the method to estimate a job duration model for young men, and show that failure to account for unobserved fixed effects causes negative schooling and union effects to be downward biased.
Bibliography Citation
Light, Audrey L. and Yoshiaki Omori. "Fixed Effects Maximum Likelihood Estimation of a Flexibly Parametric Proportional Hazard Model with an Application to Job Exits." Economics Letters 116,2 (August 2012): 236-239.
14. McCall, Brian P.
Chi, Wei
Unemployment Insurance, Unemployment Durations and Re-employment Wages
Economics Letters 99,1 (April 2008): 115-118.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176507002236
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Heterogeneity; Unemployment; Unemployment Duration; Unemployment Insurance; Wage Models

We develop an empirical model to estimate the impact of UI on unemployment duration and re-employment wages. The model estimates the UI receipt, unemployment duration and re-employment wage equations simultaneously, incorporates unobserved heterogeneity variables in each equation and allows them to be correlated. The NLSY79 data is used to estimate the model. Some results are found in support of the positive effect of UI on re-employment wages.
Bibliography Citation
McCall, Brian P. and Wei Chi. "Unemployment Insurance, Unemployment Durations and Re-employment Wages." Economics Letters 99,1 (April 2008): 115-118.
15. McGee, Andrew Dunstan
McGee, Peter
Pan, Jessica
Performance Pay, Competitiveness, and the Gender Wage Gap: Evidence from the United States
Economics Letters 128 (March 2015): 35-38.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176515000142
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Performance pay; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap

We show that women in the NLSY79 and NLSY97 are less likely than men to receive competitive compensation. The portion of the gender wage gap explained by compensation schemes is small in the NLSY79 but somewhat larger in the NLSY97.
Bibliography Citation
McGee, Andrew Dunstan, Peter McGee and Jessica Pan. "Performance Pay, Competitiveness, and the Gender Wage Gap: Evidence from the United States." Economics Letters 128 (March 2015): 35-38.
16. Parent, Daniel
Incentives? The Effect of Profit Sharing Plans Offered by Previous Employers on Current Wages
Economics Letters 83,1 (April 2004): 37-43.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176503003239
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Benefits; Benefits, Fringe; Skills; Wage Effects; Wages

Using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) data, I investigate the relationship between wages and the use of profit sharing plans by current and past employers. I find a significant wage effect of profit sharing plans in previous jobs. Also, controlling for past plans eliminates the wage effect of current plans. [Copyright 2004 Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Parent, Daniel. "Incentives? The Effect of Profit Sharing Plans Offered by Previous Employers on Current Wages." Economics Letters 83,1 (April 2004): 37-43.
17. Park, Seonyoung
Shin, Donggyun
Explaining Procyclical Male-Female Wage Gaps
Economics Letters 88,2 (August 2005): 231-235.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176505001126
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Occupational Choice; Occupations; Wages; Work Hours

Our analysis based on the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for the 1978-1999 period concludes that men's greater representation in cyclical occupational groups, such as craftsmen, operatives, and laborers, more than accounts for the gap between men and women in the cyclicality of real wages. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Park, Seonyoung and Donggyun Shin. "Explaining Procyclical Male-Female Wage Gaps." Economics Letters 88,2 (August 2005): 231-235.
18. Schofield, Lynne Steuerle
Measurement Error in the AFQT in the NLSY79
Economics Letters 123,3 (June 2014): 262-265.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176514000901
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Many promising efforts in the social sciences aim to measure future outcomes (such as wages or health outcomes) given some base level of human capital or ability. They typically fail to recognize the proxies for human capital are all measured with error, creating bias in regression analysis. Here I show how item level data offers the opportunity to improve a broad range of economic, social and psychometric studies, an opportunity now enhanced significantly by the new release of item response level data for the Armed Forces Qualifying Test in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth.
Bibliography Citation
Schofield, Lynne Steuerle. "Measurement Error in the AFQT in the NLSY79." Economics Letters 123,3 (June 2014): 262-265.
19. Sen, Bisakha
How Important Is Anticipation of Divorce in Married Women's Labor Supply Decisions? An Intercohort Comparison Using NLS Data
Economics Letters 67,2 (May 2000): 209-216.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176599002591
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Divorce; Labor Supply; Marital Instability; Marital Status; Marriage; Wives, Work; Women

I compare two birth-cohorts of married women and find that divorce-risk plays a significantly smaller role in the recent cohort's labor supply decision. This suggests that any decline in America's divorce rates will not substantially reduce married women's labor supply. Copyright: 2000 Elsevier Science S.A.
Bibliography Citation
Sen, Bisakha. "How Important Is Anticipation of Divorce in Married Women's Labor Supply Decisions? An Intercohort Comparison Using NLS Data." Economics Letters 67,2 (May 2000): 209-216.
20. Shin, Donggyun
Cyclicality of Real Wages Among Young Men
Economics Letters 46,2 (October 1994): 137-142.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0165176594900086
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Job Tenure; Job Turnover; Labor Economics; Schooling; Skills; Training; Wage Differentials; Wage Levels; Wages

This paper analyzes the cyclical behavior of real wages received by the young men in the National Longitudinal Surveys of labor market experience. It extends the studies by Bils (Journal of Political Economy, 1985, 93, 666- 689) and Tremblay (Quarterly Review of Economics and Business, 1990, 30, 90-101) by using the full duration of the survey and by examining differences in wage cyclicality across industries and between workers that change employers and those that stay with the same employer.
Bibliography Citation
Shin, Donggyun. "Cyclicality of Real Wages Among Young Men." Economics Letters 46,2 (October 1994): 137-142.
21. Speer, Jamin D.
How Bad is Occupational Coding Error? A Task-based Approach
Economics Letters 141 (April 2016): 166-168.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176516300544
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Mobility, Occupational; Occupational Choice; Occupational Information Network (O*NET); Research Methodology

Studies of occupational choice and mobility are often plagued by rampant occupational coding error. Use of task-based occupation measures, such as O*Net, may mitigate the bias caused by coding error if the occupation is misclassified as an occupation similar to the true occupation. Measuring occupational changes in "task space," I find that task-based measures reduce the problems of coding error, but only slightly. If one does not correct for coding error, one overestimates traditional occupational mobility rates by about 90%; using task-based measures, the overestimate of mobility is still 75%. I also show that when tasks are used as regressors and coding error is not corrected, estimates will be attenuated by 15-20%. Task-based measures are a slight improvement over census occupation codes but are no panacea for dealing with coding error.
Bibliography Citation
Speer, Jamin D. "How Bad is Occupational Coding Error? A Task-based Approach." Economics Letters 141 (April 2016): 166-168.
22. Usui, Emiko
Job Satisfaction and the Gender Composition of Jobs
Economics Letters 99,1 (April 2008): 23-26.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176507001802
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Job Satisfaction; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap; Wages, Women

Regarding predominantly male jobs (using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth): While both sexes prefer male jobs, women like the pay and not the job-amenities; men appreciate both. Most of the women's pay premium in male jobs suggests compensating differentials.
Bibliography Citation
Usui, Emiko. "Job Satisfaction and the Gender Composition of Jobs." Economics Letters 99,1 (April 2008): 23-26.