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Source: Feminist Economics
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Bellido, Hector
Marcen, Miriam
Molina, Jose Alberto
The Effect of Culture on Fertility Behavior of US Teen Mothers
Feminist Economics 22,3 (2016): 101-126.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13545701.2015.1120881
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Census of Population; Family Background; Fertility; Teenagers

This paper studies the impact of culture on the fertility behavior of teenage women in the US. To identify this effect, it took an epidemiological approach, exploiting the variations in teenage women's fertility rates by ancestral home country. Using three different databases (the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, and the 2000 US Census), the results show that culture has quantitatively important effects on the fertility behavior of teenage women. This finding is robust to alternative specifications, to the introduction of a range of home country variables to proxy culture, and to the measurement of individual characteristics present when teenage women continue with a pregnancy to have a child.
Bibliography Citation
Bellido, Hector, Miriam Marcen and Jose Alberto Molina. "The Effect of Culture on Fertility Behavior of US Teen Mothers." Feminist Economics 22,3 (2016): 101-126.
2. Power, Marilyn
Rosenberg, Sam
Race, Class, and Occupational Mobility: Black and White Women in Service Work in the United States
Feminist Economics 1,3 (Fall 1995): 40-59.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/714042248
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Black Youth; Mobility, Occupational; Racial Differences; Social Roles; Women

Data from the 1972 & 1988 National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women are drawn on to compare the occupational mobility of 135 black & 261 white women who worked in service occupations in the US in their late teens & 20s. A descriptive methodology is used to help illuminate the complex interaction of race, gender, & class in the lives of these women, focusing on exploring how being a service worker when young contributed to a different life story for women of different races & classes. Analysis indicates that black women experienced considerably less occupational mobility than white women, & were far more likely to get stuck in low-paid service occupations over the long term. Many of the white women, but few of the black, were able to use service work as a temporary means of support while they prepared themselves for more lucrative employment. Striking differences in class background & presence of children appeared to contribute to racial difference in mobility. 10 Tables, 27 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Power, Marilyn and Sam Rosenberg. "Race, Class, and Occupational Mobility: Black and White Women in Service Work in the United States." Feminist Economics 1,3 (Fall 1995): 40-59.
3. Yamokoski, Alexis
Keister, Lisa A.
The Wealth of Single Women: Marital Status and Parenthood in the Asset Accumulation of Young Baby Boomers in the United States
Feminist Economics 12,1-2 (January-April 2006):167-194.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13545700500508478
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Children; Disadvantaged, Economically; Divorce; Gender; Marriage; Parenthood; Parents, Single; Wealth

Special Issue: A Special Issue on Women and Wealth (Guest Edited by Carmen Diana Deere and Cheryl R. Doss)

In the United States, household wealth is unequally distributed. While facts about the distribution are readily available, less is known about the family dynamics that underlie this important component of inequality. An increasing number of households are headed by single females (both never married and divorced), and the number of single mothers among these households has grown in recent decades. This article explores differences in wealth in the US by marital status, gender, and parenting status. It focuses on young baby boomers, finding a minimal gender gap in the wealth of never-married people. However, when controlling for parenthood, strong evidence was found of a family gap in household wealth accumulation, with single mothers and fathers economically disadvantaged in comparison to adults without children. Yet, it was found that single mothers suffer the most severe economic penalties in household wealth accumulation.

Bibliography Citation
Yamokoski, Alexis and Lisa A. Keister. "The Wealth of Single Women: Marital Status and Parenthood in the Asset Accumulation of Young Baby Boomers in the United States." Feminist Economics 12,1-2 (January-April 2006):167-194.