Search Results

Source: Gerontologist
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. George, Linda K.
The Happiness Syndrome: Methodological and Substantive Issues in the Study of Social-Psychological Well-being in Adulthood
Gerontologist 19,2 (April, 1979): 210-216.
Also: http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org/content/19/2/210.abstract
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Happiness (see Positive Affect/Optimism); Income; Job Satisfaction; Life Satisfaction; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Well-Being

The major concepts and issues involved with life satisfaction measures are delineated. Also, six national data sources which could be used to analyze these measures are described including: Harris; QAL, Development and Measurement of Social Indicators, 1972-1973; NLS 1966-1976; Longitudinal Retirement History Survey 1969, 1971, 1973
Bibliography Citation
George, Linda K. "The Happiness Syndrome: Methodological and Substantive Issues in the Study of Social-Psychological Well-being in Adulthood." Gerontologist 19,2 (April, 1979): 210-216.
2. Hardy, Melissa A.
Reyes, Adriana M.
The Longevity Legacy of World War II: The Intersection of GI Status and Mortality
Gerontologist 56,1 (February 2016): 104-114.
Also: http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org/content/56/1/104.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Military Service; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Mortality; Veterans

Purpose of the Study: We examine hypotheses involving the potential health advantages of selection into military service and the potential health disadvantages associated with the experience of military service by comparing later-life mortality rates for veterans and nonveterans as well as among veterans based on their cohort of reentry into civilian life.

Design and Methods: We use data on 3,453 men, including 1,496 veterans from the older men cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys to estimate Cox proportional hazard mortality models. We distinguish between veterans and nonveterans and further classify veterans by age at exit while incorporating measures associated with military selection, health behaviors, and socioeconomic status.

Results: Veterans who were discharged from the military at older ages have a mortality advantage relative to veterans discharged at younger ages. For the 1914-1921 birth cohorts, the mortality advantage for veterans who exited around age 30 is apparent for deaths before age 65, but rates equalize across all groups when deaths at older ages are included. These findings are robust to the inclusion of background characteristics, education, occupation, body mass index, smoking, marital status, and proxies for service deferments.

Implications: Rather than focusing on a general health effect of military service, per se, future research should distinguish among individual traits; the nature, timing, and duration of exposures relative to life course stage; and the sociohistorical context of military service to expand our understanding of the differential health consequences of military service.

Bibliography Citation
Hardy, Melissa A. and Adriana M. Reyes. "The Longevity Legacy of World War II: The Intersection of GI Status and Mortality." Gerontologist 56,1 (February 2016): 104-114.
3. Moon, Marilyn
The Role of the Family in the Economic Well-being of the Elderly
Gerontologist 23,1 (February 1983): 45-50.
Also: http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org/content/23/1/45.full.pdf+html
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Family Resources; Income; Transfers, Family; Transfers, Private; Transfers, Public; Well-Being

An overview of the size and importance of private transfers of resources among relatives, based on information from the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men and the Michigan Panel Survey of Income Dynamics, is provided, and the likely tradeoffs between public and private transfers are estimated. The results of the overview illustrate the direct effect of private transfers on economic well-being. Families of all income levels and of all ages participate, albeit in different ways, in intrafamily transfers. The logit analysis of the determinants of family resource sharing suggest further the impact of age, income, and welfare recipiency. The impact of tradeoffs between public and private transfers depend on the income elasticity of private transfers and the characteristics of families participating in resource sharing. Public policy targeted at raising the incomes of a particular age group may be hampered by offsetting private transfers. [AgeLine]
Bibliography Citation
Moon, Marilyn. "The Role of the Family in the Economic Well-being of the Elderly." Gerontologist 23,1 (February 1983): 45-50.
4. Morgan, Leslie A.
Work in Widowhood: A Viable Option?
Gerontologist 20,5 Part 1 (October 1980): 581-587.
Also: http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org/content/20/5_Part_1/581.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Marital Disruption; Widows

Employment is often suggested as an important adaptive option for women who become widows. This paper evaluates the viability of working as an option for widows in mid-life. Findings from a panel of women show that relatively few widows enter the labor force, but this is due to the high percentage who are already working. Results suggest a probable overestimation of the usefulness of jobs as role replacements or income producers for widows, and an examination of other avenues of adaptation for future cohorts of widowed women.
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, Leslie A. "Work in Widowhood: A Viable Option?" Gerontologist 20,5 Part 1 (October 1980): 581-587.
5. Shaw, Lois B.
Retirement Plans of Middle-Aged Women
Gerontologist 24,2 (April 1984): 154-159.
Also: http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org/content/24/2/154.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Husbands, Influence; Pensions; Retirement; Social Security

Although the majority of middle-aged working women do not plan to retire at the same time as their husbands, having a retired husband does influence women to plan for earlier retirement than they would otherwise. Women's retirement plans are strongly influenced by their own pension and Social Security eligibility. Most women with pensions plan to postpone retirement until their pension eligibility begins even if their husbands will be retired before this time. Implications of these findings for future trends in the age of retirement for women are explored.
Bibliography Citation
Shaw, Lois B. "Retirement Plans of Middle-Aged Women." Gerontologist 24,2 (April 1984): 154-159.
6. Wilkinson, Lindsay R.
Ferraro, Kenneth
Mustillo, Sarah
Wealth in Middle and Later Life: Examining the Life Course Timing of Women's Health Limitations
The Gerontologist published online (04 June 2018): DOI: 10.1093/geront/gny048.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/gerontologist/advance-article/doi/10.1093/geront/gny048/5032612
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Disability; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Wealth

Research Design and Methods: Using 36 years of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, piecewise growth curve and linear regression models were used to estimate the effects of life course timing and duration of health limitations on household wealth.

Results: The findings reveal that women who experienced health limitations accumulated substantially less wealth over time, especially if the health limitations were manifest during childhood or early adulthood.

Bibliography Citation
Wilkinson, Lindsay R., Kenneth Ferraro and Sarah Mustillo. "Wealth in Middle and Later Life: Examining the Life Course Timing of Women's Health Limitations." The Gerontologist published online (04 June 2018): DOI: 10.1093/geront/gny048.