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Source: IZA Journal of Labor Economics
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Clark, Brian
Joubert, Clément
Maurel, Arnaud
The Career Prospects of Overeducated Americans
IZA Journal of Labor Economics 6,3 (December 2017): .
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s40172-017-0053-4
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Career Patterns; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Overeducation; Racial Differences; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we analyze career dynamics for US workers who have more schooling than their peers in the same occupation. We use data from the NLSY79 combined with the CPS to analyze transitions into and out of overeducated employment, together with the corresponding effects on wages. Overeducation is a fairly persistent phenomenon at the aggregate and individual levels, with 66% of workers remaining overeducated after 1 year. Overeducation is not just more common but also more persistent among blacks and low-AFQT individuals. Further, the hazard rate out of overeducation drops by about 60% during the first 5 years spent overeducated. However, the estimation of a mixed proportional hazard model suggests that this is attributable to selection on unobservables rather than true duration dependence. Lastly, overeducation is associated with lower current as well as future wages, consistent with scarring effects.
Bibliography Citation
Clark, Brian, Clément Joubert and Arnaud Maurel. "The Career Prospects of Overeducated Americans." IZA Journal of Labor Economics 6,3 (December 2017): .
2. Grossbard, Shoshana
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Marriage Markets as Explanation for Why Heavier People Work More Hours
IZA Journal of Labor Economics 6,9 (December 2017): DOI: 10.1186/s40172-017-0059-y.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s40172-017-0059-y
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Marriage; Modeling, OLS; Siblings; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Is BMI related to hours of work through marriage market mechanisms? We empirically explore this issue using data from the NLSY79 and NLSY97 and a number of estimation strategies (including OLS, IV, and sibling FE). Our IV estimates (with same-sex sibling's BMI as an instrument and a large set of controls including wage) suggest that a one-unit increase in BMI leads to an almost 2% increase in White married women's hours of work. However, BMI is not associated with hours of work of married men. We also find that a one-unit increase in BMI leads to a 1.4% increase in White single women's hours of work, suggesting that single women may expect future in-marriage transfers that vary by body weight. We show that the positive association between BMI and hours of work of White single women increases with self-assessed probability of future marriage and varies with expected cumulative spousal income. Comparisons between the association between BMI and hours of work for White and Black married women suggest a possible racial gap in intra-marriage transfers from husbands to wives.
Bibliography Citation
Grossbard, Shoshana and Sankar Mukhopadhyay. "Marriage Markets as Explanation for Why Heavier People Work More Hours." IZA Journal of Labor Economics 6,9 (December 2017): DOI: 10.1186/s40172-017-0059-y.
3. Junker, Brian
Schofield, Lynne Steuerle
Taylor, Lowell J.
The Use of Cognitive Ability Measures as Explanatory Variables in Regression Analysis
IZA Journal of Labor Economics 1,4 (October 2012): .
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/2193-8997-1-4
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Modeling, Mixed Effects; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Racial Differences; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Cognitive ability measures are often taken as explanatory variables in regression analysis, e.g., as a factor affecting a market outcome such as an individual’s wage, or a decision such as an individual’s education acquisition. Cognitive ability is a latent construct; its true value is unobserved. Nonetheless, researchers often assume that a test score, constructed via standard psychometric practice from individuals’ responses to test items, can be safely used in regression analysis. We examine problems that can arise, and suggest that an alternative approach, a “mixed effects structural equations” (MESE) model, may be more appropriate in many circumstances.
Bibliography Citation
Junker, Brian, Lynne Steuerle Schofield and Lowell J. Taylor. "The Use of Cognitive Ability Measures as Explanatory Variables in Regression Analysis." IZA Journal of Labor Economics 1,4 (October 2012): .
4. Kondo, Ayako
Differential Effects of Graduating during a Recession across Gender and Race
IZA Journal of Labor Economics 4,23 (December 2015): DOI: 10.1186/s40172-015-0040-6.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s40172-015-0040-6
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Economic Changes/Recession; Gender Differences; Geocoded Data; High School Completion/Graduates; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Racial Differences; State-Level Data/Policy; Unemployment Rate; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the differential effects of the unemployment rate at labor market entry, defined as the time of leaving school, on subsequent wages across gender and race using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79. Results suggest that the negative effect of a recession at entry on wages is weaker for women. The differences between blacks and whites are not statistically significant for both genders. These results are robust to controlling for the endogenous timing and location of entry, using an instrumental variable based on the predicted year of graduation and the state of residence at age 14.
Bibliography Citation
Kondo, Ayako. "Differential Effects of Graduating during a Recession across Gender and Race." IZA Journal of Labor Economics 4,23 (December 2015): DOI: 10.1186/s40172-015-0040-6.
5. Maclean, Johanna Catherine
Does Leaving School in an Economic Downturn Impact Access to Employer-sponsored Health Insurance?
IZA Journal of Labor Policy 3,19 (December 2014): DOI: 10.1186/2193-9004-3-19.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/2193-9004-3-19
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Benefits, Insurance; College Degree; College Dropouts; Dropouts; Economic Changes/Recession; Geocoded Data; Insurance, Health; Labor Force Participation; Unemployment Rate, Regional

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous work documents that leaving school in an economic downturn persistently depresses career outcomes as measured by wages, earnings, and other markers of labor market success. In this study I test whether leaving school in an economic downturn influences access to employer-sponsored health insurance. Using a long panel of workers drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort, I model the likelihood that a worker has access to employer-sponsored health insurance from initial labor market entrance through mid-career. I address the potential endogeneity of time and location of school-leaving with instrumental variables. My results suggest that leaving school in an economic downturn lowers the probability of access to employer-sponsored health insurance and this disparity is statistically distinguishable from zero 18 years after school-leaving.
Bibliography Citation
Maclean, Johanna Catherine. "Does Leaving School in an Economic Downturn Impact Access to Employer-sponsored Health Insurance?" IZA Journal of Labor Policy 3,19 (December 2014): DOI: 10.1186/2193-9004-3-19.