Search Results

Source: Injury Prevention
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Mott, Joshua Adam
Personal and Family Predictors of Children's Medically Attended Injuries that Occurred in the Home
Injury Prevention 5,3 (September 1999): 189-193.
Also: http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/5/3/189.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Ltd. - British Medical Journal Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Child Health; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Home Environment; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Injuries

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study examined the independent contributions of demographic, behavioral, and environmental antecedents of pediatric medically attended injuries that occurred in the home. Setting: Two thousand and thirty six American children aged 4-12 in 1988 were drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Method: Multiple logistic regression was used to examine whether having a medically attended injury that occurred in the home in 1990 was related to environmental, behavioral, and demographic indicators measured in 1988. To account for individual differences in access to care, results were stratified within samples of children that had, and had not, demonstrated a prior ability to access the medical care system for injury treatment. Results: Among children who did not access the medical care system for injury treatment in 1988, measures of home environmental risk factors did not distinguish those injured at home from those not injured at home in 1990. However, among children who did access the medical care system for injury treatment in 1988, indicators of "dark" (relative risk 4.68, p=0.019) and "cluttered" (relative risk 4.31, p=0.038) home environments became significantly and independently associated with home injuries in 1990. Conclusion: If not accounted for in data collection or analyses, individual differences in non-financial barriers to medical care may lead to an underestimation of the influences of important home environmental risk factors for medically attended injuries.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Joshua Adam. "Personal and Family Predictors of Children's Medically Attended Injuries that Occurred in the Home." Injury Prevention 5,3 (September 1999): 189-193.
2. Phelan, Kieran J.
Khoury, Jane C.
Atherton, Harry
Kahn, Robert S.
Maternal Depression, Child Behavior, and Injury
Injury Prevention 13,6 (December 2007): 403-408.
Also: http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/13/6/403.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Ltd. - British Medical Journal Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Accidents; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); CESD (Depression Scale); Children, Well-Being; Depression (see also CESD); Injuries; Mothers, Health

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: Few data exist on the effect of maternal depression on child injury outcomes and mediators of this relationship.

Objective: To examine the relationship between mothers' depressive symptoms and medically attended injuries in their children and the potential mediating role of child behavior.

Design/Methods: A cohort of mother–child dyads from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth followed from 1992 to1994. The primary exposure variable was maternal depressive symptoms as measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale in 1992. Child behavior was assessed by the Behavior Problems Index externalizing subscale. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms, child behavior, and injury reported in the prior year in 1994.

Results: 94 medically attended injuries were reported in the 1106 children (8.5%); two-thirds were sustained in the home environment. Maternal depressive symptoms significantly increased the risk of child injury; injury risk increased 4% for every 1-point increase in depressive symptoms (adjusted OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08, p = 0.02). Increasing maternal depressive symptoms also increased the risk of externalizing behavior problems (adjusted OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.09), but externalizing behavior problems did not significantly mediate the relationship between maternal symptoms and child injury.

Conclusions: Increasing depressive symptoms in mothers was associated with an increased risk of child injury. Child behavior did not significantly mediate the association between maternal depressive symptoms and child injury in this cohort. Greater recognition, referral, and treatment of depressive symptoms in mothers may have effects on child behavior and injury risk.

Bibliography Citation
Phelan, Kieran J., Jane C. Khoury, Harry Atherton and Robert S. Kahn. "Maternal Depression, Child Behavior, and Injury." Injury Prevention 13,6 (December 2007): 403-408.