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Source: International Advances in Economic Research
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Chatterjee, Swarnankur
Zahirovic-Herbert, Velma
Homeownership and Housing Equity: An Examination of Native- Immigrant Differences in Housing Wealth
International Advances in Economic Research 17,2 (May 2011): 211-223.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/79ul86333263k7r6/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Home Ownership; Immigrants; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the differences in homeownership between immigrants and native-born residents using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) data. We estimate the preference for homeownership and the amount of home equity held by households using a two-stage procedure. The results indicate that, although immigrants are less likely to be homeowners, immigrants who make the decision to own homes are more likely to have greater housing equity than native-born residents. About 66 to 70% of the disparity in homeownership can be explained by the difference in characteristics. The remaining disparity results from different homeownership functions estimated for the two groups. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy makers, real estate market researchers, and scholars of consumer behavior. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Chatterjee, Swarnankur and Velma Zahirovic-Herbert. "Homeownership and Housing Equity: An Examination of Native- Immigrant Differences in Housing Wealth." International Advances in Economic Research 17,2 (May 2011): 211-223.
2. Dalmia, Sonia
Sicilian, Paul
Kids Cause Specialization: Evidence for Becker's Household Division of Labor Hypothesis
International Advances in Economic Research 14,4 (November 2008): 448-459.
Also: http://web.ebscohost.com.proxy.lib.ohio-state.edu/ehost/pdf?vid=3&hid=106&sid=2338df91-7fbf-4d7c-b8fa-239f91d9cfff%40sessionmgr112
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Child Care; Children; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Domestic Violence; Family Planning; Family Structure; Fertility; Marital Dissolution; Marriage; Sex Ratios

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We examine the division of labor within households and marital matching patterns in the USA using both the Current Population Survey (CPS) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). We use Becker's theory of marriage markets by estimating household production functions and using the estimates to test for positive or negative assortive matching. We also construct match matrices, which are used to judge how well our model fits Becker's theory. We find positive assortative matching on all traits in young marriages and couples without children, and negative assortment along some traits in marriages with children. This suggests that children induce specialization whereas couples without children exploit household public goods.
Bibliography Citation
Dalmia, Sonia and Paul Sicilian. "Kids Cause Specialization: Evidence for Becker's Household Division of Labor Hypothesis." International Advances in Economic Research 14,4 (November 2008): 448-459.
3. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
Employed Job Search among Young Workers: Do Women Still Search Differently than Men in the Internet Age?
International Advances in Economic Research 23,2 (May 2017): 245-259.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12103-016-9365-3
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Computer Use; Gender; Job Search

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 2008–2011 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this study explores the job search methods and strategies utilized by young workers. Although women are found to be marginally less likely to engage in on-the-job search than men, when they do they are equally likely to use the internet. The most important gender difference identified is that marriage serves as a strong inhibiting factor to search, both online and offline, for women but not so for men. In terms of search methods, men and women show almost identical patterns of usage. While there is substitution between online and offline search within particular method categories, employed searchers are generally using the internet as a complement to rather than as a replacement for more traditional offline search methods.
Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon. "Employed Job Search among Young Workers: Do Women Still Search Differently than Men in the Internet Age?" International Advances in Economic Research 23,2 (May 2017): 245-259.
4. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
Some Empirical Evidence of the Efficacy of Job Matching in Urban Labor Markets
International Advances in Economic Research 15,2 (May 2009): 233-244
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Job Search; Rural/Urban Differences; Urbanization/Urban Living

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Theory predicts that workers in cities are more likely to engage in job search, ceteris paribus, due to market efficiencies associated with greater job density. However, if job search is more efficient in urban markets, then the quality of a given job match should also tend to be higher in cities, ceteris paribus. Employed workers living in cities might then be expected to search less than their nonurban counterparts. In this latter instance, it is not city residency itself that makes search less likely, but rather the positive correlation between city residency and job match quality. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this prediction is confirmed: The estimated coefficient on an indicator of urban residency is found to be near zero and statistically insignificant in models of employed search that omit proxies for job match quality. When job match proxies are included in the models, the estimated coefficient on urban residency becomes positive and highly significant. This result suggests that workers are not only more likely to engage in employed search in urban labor markets, but also tend to find more productive job matches in cities over time. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon. "Some Empirical Evidence of the Efficacy of Job Matching in Urban Labor Markets." International Advances in Economic Research 15,2 (May 2009): 233-244.