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Source: International Journal of Business and Finance Research
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Chatterjee, Swarnankur
Do Immigrants Have Lower Participation Rates in U.S. Financial Markets?
International Journal of Business and Finance Research 3,2 (December 2009): 1-13.
Also: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1634061
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Business and Finance Research, LLC. (IBFR)
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Financial Investments; Immigrants; Income; Income Risk

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey to examine the differences in individual financial market participation among native-born and immigrant Americans. The results indicate that when compared with natives, immigrants are less likely to own financial assets. A decomposition analysis of financial asset ownership reveals that income gap along with differences in educational attainment as well as the wealth and risk tolerance are the biggest contributors to this disparity. Additionally, income, wealth, inheritance, and educational attainment are positive predictors of financial market participation. Age, income, net worth and number of years of stay in the United States are positively associated with increase in financial wealth of immigrants across time. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Chatterjee, Swarnankur. "Do Immigrants Have Lower Participation Rates in U.S. Financial Markets?" International Journal of Business and Finance Research 3,2 (December 2009): 1-13.
2. Mimura, Yoko
Variations in Retirement Account Holdings among Women: Native and Immigrants in the U.S.
International Journal of Business and Finance Research 7,5 (April 2013): 11-22.
Also: http://www.theibfr.com/ARCHIVE/IJBFR-V7N5-2013.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Business and Finance Research, LLC. (IBFR)
Keyword(s): Immigrants; Retirement; Savings; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigated how immigrant status and life expectancy in the country of origin relate to variations in retirement savings among working age women in the U.S. Specifically, utilizing the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort data, this study compared native-born Americans, naturalized citizens, and female, non-U.S. citizens in regards to retirement-specific accounts. Overall, naturalized U.S. citizens had higher odds of saving for retirement than non-U.S. citizens; however, after controlling for socio-economic backgrounds, the difference was not significant. Variations in female life expectancies provided weak support to correlate with saving for retirement among female immigrants. Rather, variations in the demographic characteristics of these women explained the differences in the odds of having savings in a U.S. retirement account. The findings gave support for immigrants' economic assimilations corresponding with delayed cultural assimilations and implications for financial service professionals who work with immigrant clients.
Bibliography Citation
Mimura, Yoko. "Variations in Retirement Account Holdings among Women: Native and Immigrants in the U.S. ." International Journal of Business and Finance Research 7,5 (April 2013): 11-22.