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Source: International Journal of Obesity
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Allison, David B.
Faith, Myles S.
Nathan, J. S.
Risch's Lambda Values for Human Obesity
International Journal of Obesity 20,11 (November 1996): 990-999.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8923155
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Genetics; Obesity; Pairs (also see Siblings); Sample Selection

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVE: Risch's lambda statistic (lambda-R)is related to the heritability of traits and can be useful in several contexts, including the conduct of power analyses to determine sample size for gene mapping studies. However, values of lambda-R have not been presented for human obesity. DESIGN AND RESULTS: Using both analytic and empirical approaches, the present study calculates estimates of lambda-R. Examples are provided to illustrate the use of these estimates for determining sample size for genetic mapping studies.
Bibliography Citation
Allison, David B., Myles S. Faith and J. S. Nathan. "Risch's Lambda Values for Human Obesity." International Journal of Obesity 20,11 (November 1996): 990-999.
2. Averett, Susan L.
Korenman, Sanders D.
Black-White Differences in Social and Economic Consequences of Obesity
International Journal of Obesity 23,2 (February 1999): 166-173.
Also: http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v23/n2/pdf/0800805a.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Stockton Press
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Ethnic Differences; Labor Market Outcomes; Marriage; Obesity; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate social and economic effects of obesity for black and white females, and to explore possible explanations for race differences in obesity effects. SUBJECTS: 1354 non-Hispanic black and 3097 non-Hispanic, non-black, women aged 25-33yr. in 1990 from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979-1990. MEASUREMENTS: Body mass index (BMI) evaluated at age 17-24 yr. (1982) and 25-33 yr. (1990). METHODS: Logistic and linear regression of six labour market and marriage outcomes on early or attained BMI. Detailed controls for family socioeconomic background. RESULTS: Socioeconomic effects of obesity appear larger for whites than blacks. Obesity is associated with low self-esteem among whites, but not blacks. Differences in self-esteem do not account for race differences in the effects of obesity on socioeconomic status. Lower probability of marriage and lower earnings of husbands among those who marry account for the majority of the income differences between obese white women and those of recommended weight. Occupational differences account for more than one fifth of the effect of obesity on the hourly wages of both white and black women. CONCLUSION: Cultural differences may protect black women from the self-esteem loss associated with obesity for whites. However, differences in self-esteem do not account for the effects of obesity on socioeconomic status. Because the effect of obesity on the economic status of white women works primarily through marriage, it may therefore be less amenable to policy intervention to improve the labor market prospects of obese women.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L. and Sanders D. Korenman. "Black-White Differences in Social and Economic Consequences of Obesity." International Journal of Obesity 23,2 (February 1999): 166-173.
3. Cohen, Alison K.
Chaffee, Benjamin W.
Rehkopf, David
Coyle, Jeremy R.
Abrams, Barbara
Excessive Gestational Weight Gain over Multiple Pregnancies and the Prevalence of Obesity at Age 40
International Journal of Obesity 38,5 (May 2014): 714-718.
Also: http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v38/n5/abs/ijo2013156a.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Births, Repeat / Spacing; Body Mass Index (BMI); Childbearing; Life Course; Mothers, Health; Obesity; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: Although several studies have found an association between excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) and obesity later in life, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have explored the role of GWG events across the life course.

Design and methods: We describe how the prevalence of midlife obesity (BMI greater than or equal to30 at age 40 or 41) among women varies by life course patterns of GWG (using 2009 IOM guidelines) in the USA's National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort.

Results: Among women who reported 1-3 births before age 40, the prevalence of midlife obesity increased with a rising number of excessive GWG events: from none (23.4%, n=875) to one (37.6%, n=707), from none (23.4%, n=875) to two (46.8%, n=427) and from none (23.4%, n=875) to three (54.6%, n=108), P<0.00005 for trend. Obesity prevalence was similar for the same number of excessive GWG events, regardless of parity. No clear pattern emerged for the sequencing of excessive GWG event(s) and later obesity.

Conclusions: In our descriptive exploratory study, excessive GWG events appear to be associated with increased prevalence of obesity for parous women, suggesting the importance of preventive interventions regardless of timing of pregnancy-related weight changes over the life course.

Bibliography Citation
Cohen, Alison K., Benjamin W. Chaffee, David Rehkopf, Jeremy R. Coyle and Barbara Abrams. "Excessive Gestational Weight Gain over Multiple Pregnancies and the Prevalence of Obesity at Age 40." International Journal of Obesity 38,5 (May 2014): 714-718.
4. Mannino, David M.
Mott, Joshua Adam
Ferdinands, Jill M.
Camargo, Carlos A.
Friedman, Michael S.
Greves, H.M.
Redd, Stephen C.
Boys with High Body Masses Have an Increased Risk of Developing Asthma: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY)
International Journal of Obesity 30,1 (January 2006): 6-13.
Also: http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v30/n1/abs/0803145a.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Stockton Press
Keyword(s): Asthma; Body Mass Index (BMI); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Ethnic Differences; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Obesity; Poverty; Racial Differences; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: To determine the relation between body mass index and the development of asthma in children.

Design: Prospective study of 4393 asthma-free children followed for up to 14 years.

Setting: Children of participants in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth.

Methods: Analysis was limited to children who were followed from birth and were asthma-free during the first 24 months of life. The outcome was the development of asthma during follow-up (incident asthma). Body mass index (BMI) was our main predictor of interest. Survival analyses, using time to development of asthma as the main endpoint, were stratified by sex and controlled for race/ethnicity, poverty status, and prenatal maternal smoking.

Results: Asthma developed in 218 (5.0 %) children during the follow-up period. The relation between BMI and incident asthma varied by sex. A BMI >=85th percentile at age 2-3 years was a risk factor for subsequent asthma development in boys (hazard ratio (HR) 1.6 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1, 2.4) but not girls (HR 0.8, 95% CI 0.5, 1.4). Similarly, boys with BMIs always >=85th percentile were at increased risk for subsequent asthma development (HR 2.4, 95% CI 1.4, 4.4) but not girls (HR 1.5, 95% CI 0.7, 2.9).

Conclusion: Boys with high body masses may be at an increased risk for developing asthma. International Journal of Obesity (2006) 30, 6-13. doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0803145 [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Bibliography Citation
Mannino, David M., Joshua Adam Mott, Jill M. Ferdinands, Carlos A. Camargo, Michael S. Friedman, H.M. Greves and Stephen C. Redd. "Boys with High Body Masses Have an Increased Risk of Developing Asthma: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY)." International Journal of Obesity 30,1 (January 2006): 6-13.
5. Weaver, Robert G.
Brazendale, Keith
Hunt, Ethan
Sarzynski, Mark A.
Beets, Michael W.
White, Kellee
Disparities in Childhood Overweight and Obesity by Income in the United States: An Epidemiological Examination Using Three Nationally Representative Datasets
International Journal of Obesity published online (4 February 2019): DOI: 10.1038/s41366-019-0331-2.
Also: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41366-019-0331-2
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B, ECLS-K); Family Income; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES); Obesity; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background/Objectives: Overweight and obesity (OWOB) is a global epidemic. Adults and adolescents from low-income households are at higher risk to be OWOB. This study examined the relationship between income and OWOB prevalence in children and adolescents (518 years) in the United States (US) within and across race/ethnicities, and changes in this relationship from 1971 to 2014.

Subjects/Methods: A meta-analysis of a nationally representative sample (N = 73,891) of US children and adolescents drawn from three datasets (i.e., National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, & the Early Childhood Longitudinal Program) which included 14 cross-sectional waves spanning 1971-2014 was conducted. The exposure was household income-to-poverty ratio (low income = 0.00-1.00, middle income = 1.01-4.00, high income >4.00) with prevalence of overweight or obesity (body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) as the outcome.

Bibliography Citation
Weaver, Robert G., Keith Brazendale, Ethan Hunt, Mark A. Sarzynski, Michael W. Beets and Kellee White. "Disparities in Childhood Overweight and Obesity by Income in the United States: An Epidemiological Examination Using Three Nationally Representative Datasets." International Journal of Obesity published online (4 February 2019): DOI: 10.1038/s41366-019-0331-2.
6. Wraw, Christina
Deary, Ian J.
Der, Geoff
Gale, Catharine R.
Maternal and Offspring Intelligence in Relation to BMI across Childhood and Adolescence
International Journal of Obesity 42 (2018): 1610-1620.
Also: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41366-018-0009-1
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Body Mass Index (BMI); Children; I.Q.; Mothers; Obesity; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: The present study tested the association between both mothers' and offspring's intelligence and offspring's body mass index (BMI) in youth.

Method: Participants were members of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY-79) Children and Young Adults cohort (n = 11,512) and their biological mothers who were members of the NLSY-79 (n = 4932). Offspring's IQ was measured with the Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT). Mothers' IQ was measured with the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). A series of regression analyses tested the association between IQ and offspring's BMI by age group, while adjusting for pre-pregnancy BMI and family SES. The analyses were stratified by sex and ethnicity (non-Black and non-Hispanic, Black, and Hispanic).

Bibliography Citation
Wraw, Christina, Ian J. Deary, Geoff Der and Catharine R. Gale. "Maternal and Offspring Intelligence in Relation to BMI across Childhood and Adolescence." International Journal of Obesity 42 (2018): 1610-1620.