Search Results

Source: Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Hassett-Walker, Connie
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Bell, Bethany A.
Fisk, Calley E.
Shadden, Mark
Zhou, Weidan
How Does Early Adulthood Arrest Alter Substance use Behavior? Are There Differential Effects by Race/Ethnicity and Gender?
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology 3,2 (June 2017): 196-220.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40865-017-0060-y
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Arrests; Criminal Justice System; Drug Use; Gender Differences; Racial Differences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Much criminal justice research has ignored racial/ethnic and gender differences in substance use subsequent to criminal justice involvement. This paper investigated how early adulthood arrest (i.e., 18 to 21 years of age) influences individuals' subsequent transitions from non-substance use to substance use and substance use to non-substance use through age 30. We also consider if these relationships differ by race/ethnicity and gender. Processes proscribed by labeling theory subsequent to getting arrested are considered.
Bibliography Citation
Hassett-Walker, Connie, Katrina Michelle Walsemann, Bethany A. Bell, Calley E. Fisk, Mark Shadden and Weidan Zhou. "How Does Early Adulthood Arrest Alter Substance use Behavior? Are There Differential Effects by Race/Ethnicity and Gender?" Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology 3,2 (June 2017): 196-220.
2. Walters, Glenn D.
Low Self-Control, Peer Rejection, Reactive Criminal Thinking, and Delinquent Peer Associations: Connecting the Pieces of the Crime Puzzle
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology 2,2 (June 2016): 209-231.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40865-016-0028-3
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Anxiety; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Self-Control/Self-Regulation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: The present series of studies were designed to test the control model of criminal lifestyle development which integrates aspects of low self-control, general strain, differential association, and criminal thinking.

Methods: Participants for the first study were 411 boys from the Cambridge Study of Delinquency Development, and participants for the second study were 3817 children from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child (NLSY-C) sample.

Results: In the first study (Cambridge), peer-rated popularity (peer rejection) and teacher-rated low self-control were cross-lagged, with results showing that while low self-control predicted peer rejection, peer rejection did not predict low self-control. In the second study (NLSY-C), findings revealed that (1) peer rejection predicted deviant peer associations but not vice versa, (2) delinquency and reactive criminal thinking mediated the peer rejection–peer delinquency relationship, and (3) negative affect (depression, anxiety, loneliness) alone did not mediate the peer rejection–peer delinquency relationship nor did it alter the indirect effects of delinquency and reactive criminal thinking on this relationship.

Conclusions: The results of these two studies suggest that theoretical integration is possible and that reactive criminal thinking plays an important role in mediating relationships involving such traditional criminological variables as low self-control, strain created by peer rejection, and peer delinquency.

Bibliography Citation
Walters, Glenn D. "Low Self-Control, Peer Rejection, Reactive Criminal Thinking, and Delinquent Peer Associations: Connecting the Pieces of the Crime Puzzle." Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology 2,2 (June 2016): 209-231.