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Source: Journal of Drug Issues
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Connolly, Eric J.
Sex Differences in Childhood Bullying Victimization and Trajectories of Substance Use From Adolescence to Adulthood
Journal of Drug Issues 47,1 (January 2017): 25-49.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0022042616678605
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: College of Criminology and Criminal Justice
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Bullying/Victimization; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Drug Use; Gender Differences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent research has found that repeated bullying victimization increases the risk of developing several unhealthy habits later in life including periodic substance use. Comparatively less research, however, has examined whether the association between bullying victimization and developmental growth in substance use is different for males and females. The present study addressed this gap in the literature by analyzing data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Results from a series of sex-specific latent growth curve models reveal that bullied males experience faster increases in cigarette and marijuana use from adolescence to young adulthood compared to non-bullied males, while bullied females experience faster increases in cigarette use compared to non-bullied females. Bullied males also experience slower declines in cigarette and marijuana use from adolescence to middle adulthood, while bullied females experience slower declines in alcohol and cigarette use. Implications of these findings for research on sex differences in bullying victimization and developmental patterns of substance use are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Connolly, Eric J. "Sex Differences in Childhood Bullying Victimization and Trajectories of Substance Use From Adolescence to Adulthood." Journal of Drug Issues 47,1 (January 2017): 25-49.
2. Hoffmann, John P.
Dufur, Mikaela J.
Huang, Lynn
Drug Use and Job Quits: A Longitudinal Analysis
Journal of Drug Issues 37,3 (Summer 2007): 569-596
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: College of Criminology and Criminal Justice
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Gender Differences; Mobility, Job; Quits; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Voluntary job separation, or quitting, occurs for a variety of reasons. Although it is often a positive move, it may also lead to periods of unemployment. Studies suggest that one factor that may be implicated in the likelihood of quitting is illicit drug use: Adult drug users may not only quit more frequently but also have a heightened probability of unemployment following a quit. Yet, prior research has not taken a sufficient longitudinal perspective, considered contemporary research on job mobility, nor examined gender differences. We assessed the association using longitudinal data on 8,512 individuals followed from 1984 to 1995. The results indicated that marijuana and cocaine use were associated with a higher probability of quitting. Moreover, marijuana use among males, but not females, was associated with a higher likelihood of experiencing periods of unemployment following a quit. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding gender-distinct patterns of drug use and occupational trajectories. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Hoffmann, John P., Mikaela J. Dufur and Lynn Huang. "Drug Use and Job Quits: A Longitudinal Analysis." Journal of Drug Issues 37,3 (Summer 2007): 569-596.
3. Richardson, George B.
Dai, Chia-Liang
Chen, Ching-Chen
Nedelec, Joseph L.
Swoboda, Christopher M.
Chen, Wei-Wen
Adolescent Life History Strategy in the Intergenerational Transmission and Developmental Stability of Substance Use
Journal of Drug Issues 46,2 (April 2016): 102-121.
Also: http://jod.sagepub.com/content/46/2/102
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: College of Criminology and Criminal Justice
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Drug Use; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Life Course; Personality/Big Five Factor Model or Traits; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research suggests that fast life history strategy (LHS) may be a primary driver of substance use among young adults. However, a recent study reported that (a) young adult fast LHS did not subsume all theorized indicators of LHS during this period and (b) fast LHS among parents did not predict young adult fast LHS or liability for use of common substances. In this study, we used structural equations and national data to test whether these findings generalized to adolescence. In addition, given that LHS and substance use share genetic and neuropsychological bases, we examined whether fast LHS could explain the developmental stability of substance use. Overall, our results extend the findings discussed above and suggest that fast LHS fully explains the developmental stability of substance use among youth. We discuss implications for life history models, research applying life history theory and substance use, and substance abuse prevention and treatment.
Bibliography Citation
Richardson, George B., Chia-Liang Dai, Ching-Chen Chen, Joseph L. Nedelec, Christopher M. Swoboda and Wei-Wen Chen. "Adolescent Life History Strategy in the Intergenerational Transmission and Developmental Stability of Substance Use." Journal of Drug Issues 46,2 (April 2016): 102-121.