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Source: Journal of Economic Issues
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Mitra, Aparna
Access to Supervisory Jobs and the Gender Wage Gap among Professionals
Journal of Economic Issues 37,4 (December 2003): 1023-1044.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=0674110&db=ecn
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Association for Evolutionary Economics (AFEE)
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Discrimination, Age; Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Discrimination, Sex; Education; Human Capital; Job Tenure; Marital Status; Modeling, Logit; Occupational Choice; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Wage Differentials; Wage Levels; Wages, Men; Wages, Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1998), this paper analyzes the allocation of supervisory positions and earnings of men and women in professional jobs. The results show that women are less likely than men to hold supervisory positions even after controlling for detailed worker and job characteristics. Professional women earn marginally higher wages associated with supervisory duties, and significant gender wage gap exists among all supervisors. However, among supervisors who hold authority positions, women earn substantially higher wages and the gender wage gap is significantly reduced. Human capital variables explain very little of the gender wage differential among supervisors. Additionally, employment in large firms enhances the earnings of male supervisors but has no impact on women's career and earnings.
Bibliography Citation
Mitra, Aparna. "Access to Supervisory Jobs and the Gender Wage Gap among Professionals." Journal of Economic Issues 37,4 (December 2003): 1023-1044.
2. Wiens-Tuers, Barbara A.
Hill, Elizabeth T.
How Did We Get Here from There? Movement into Temporary Employment
Journal of Economic Issues 36,2 (June 2002): 303-311.
Also: http://diglib.lib.utk.edu/utj/jei/36/jei-36-2-6.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Association for Evolutionary Economics (AFEE)
Keyword(s): Employment, Part-Time; Family Studies; Part-Time Work; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examines the shift in the focus of employers from employment stability to employment flexibility. Impact of the growth of the temporary industry and temporary work on employment, uncertainty, and changing norms; Factors which are associated with people entering into temporary work, including an effort to balance family and work; Use of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth in the analysis; Discussion of poverty among temporary workers.

The paper (see, the .pdf file) was prepared for the annual meeting of the Association for Evolutionary Economics at the Allied Social Science Association meetings in Atlanta, Georgia, January 4–6, 2002 and published in Journal of Economic Issues in 2002.

Bibliography Citation
Wiens-Tuers, Barbara A. and Elizabeth T. Hill. "How Did We Get Here from There? Movement into Temporary Employment." Journal of Economic Issues 36,2 (June 2002): 303-311.