Search Results

Source: Journal of Family Issues
Resulting in 47 citations.
1. Baharudin, Rozumah
Luster, Thomas
Factors Related to the Quality of the Home Environment and Children's Achievement
Journal of Family Issues 19,4 (July 1998): 375-403.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/19/4/375.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Education; Ethnic Differences; Family Income; Family Structure; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intelligence; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Racial Differences; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study tested Belsky's model of the determinants of parenting. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), the study focused on 898 mothers (African Americans, n = 347; Caucasians, n = 551) and their 6- to 8-year-old children. Consistent with Belsky's model, mothers who provided better quality home environments had higher levels of education, intelligence, and self-esteem. Mothers with higher family incomes, fewer children. and higher marital quality provided more supportive home environments. In addition, age and gender of the children were significantly related to the quality of the children's home environments. Additional analyses indicated that the quality of the home environment that mothers of both ethnic groups provided was related to their children's achievement.
Bibliography Citation
Baharudin, Rozumah and Thomas Luster. "Factors Related to the Quality of the Home Environment and Children's Achievement." Journal of Family Issues 19,4 (July 1998): 375-403.
2. Baum, Charles L., II
The Long-Term Effects of Early and Recent Maternal Employment on a Child's Academic Achievement
Journal of Family Issues 25, 1 (2004): 29-60.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/25/1/29.full.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Achievement; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Children, Academic Development; High School; Maternal Employment; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); School Progress

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

More children today are being raised in households with mothers who work for pay compared to a generation ago, when most mothers did not engage in marketplace work. This demographic change is important because it could affect children. In this article, the effects of early and recent maternal employment on a child's academic development are identified as measured by high school grades. Results suggest that whereas early maternal employment does not have an effect, recent maternal employment (during a child's adolescent years) significantly decreases grades. Results also show that the effects of maternal employment do not differ for boys and girls.
Bibliography Citation
Baum, Charles L., II. "The Long-Term Effects of Early and Recent Maternal Employment on a Child's Academic Achievement." Journal of Family Issues 25, 1 (2004): 29-60.
3. Beck, Rubye W.
Beck, Scott Herman
The Incidence of Extended Households among Middle-Aged Black and White Women: Estimates from a 15-Year Panel Study
Journal of Family Issues 10,2 (June 1989): 147-168.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/10/2/147.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Family Structure; Family, Extended; Household Structure; Marital Status; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this descriptive analysis, data from the NLS of Mature Women are used to compare cross-section and fifteen-year estimates of the incidence of various types of extended households. Data on black and white women are analyzed separately and the estimates for proportion of middle-aged women living in extended households are presented by marital status. Results show large differences between single-year and fifteen-year estimates of the incidence of extension. Overall, between one-fourth and one-third of white middle-aged women lived in extended households for some time over the fifteen year period and approximately two-thirds of black women experienced this household form for at least part of their middle years. The authors conclude that, contrary to popular and academic perceptions, extended families are a relatively common form of living arrangements for adults in this country, if only for short periods of time. This may be one indicator of the prevalence of the modified-extended family as a family form in the United States.
Bibliography Citation
Beck, Rubye W. and Scott Herman Beck. "The Incidence of Extended Households among Middle-Aged Black and White Women: Estimates from a 15-Year Panel Study." Journal of Family Issues 10,2 (June 1989): 147-168.
4. Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Carrano, Jennifer
Father-Child Relationship, Parenting Styles, and Adolescent Risk Behaviors in Intact Families
Journal of Family Issues 27,6 (June 2006): 850-881.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/27/6/850
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Involvement; Gender Differences; Modeling, Logit; Parenting Skills/Styles; Risk-Taking; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The father-child relationship and father's parenting style are examined as predictors of first delinquency and substance use, using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997, Rounds 1 to 3 (N = 5,345), among adolescents in intact families. Discrete time logistic regressions indicate that a more positive father-child relationship predicts a reduced risk of engagement in multiple first risky behaviors. Having a father with an authoritarian parenting style is associated with an increased risk of engaging in delinquent activity and substance use. Two-way interaction models further indicate that the negative effect of authoritarian parenting is reduced when fathers have a positive relationship with their adolescent. Permissive parenting also predicts less risky behavior when the father-child relationship is positive. The positive influence of the father-child relationship on risk behaviors is stronger for male than for female adolescents.
Bibliography Citation
Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta, Kristin Anderson Moore and Jennifer Carrano. "Father-Child Relationship, Parenting Styles, and Adolescent Risk Behaviors in Intact Families ." Journal of Family Issues 27,6 (June 2006): 850-881.
5. Campbell, Lori A.
Parcel, Toby L.
Children's Home Environments in Great Britain and the United States
Journal of Family Issues 31,5 (May 2010): 559-584.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/31/5/559
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Britain, British; Cross-national Analysis; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Human Capital; Maternal Employment; NCDS - National Child Development Study (British); Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study analyzes the effects of human, social, and financial capital on children's home environments in the United States and Great Britain by comparing a sample of 5- to 13-year-old children from the United States with a similar sample from Britain. In both countries, the authors find weaker home environments for boys, minority children, and those with more siblings. Parental education and maternal cognitive ability are linked to stronger home environments. The effects of family structure, maternal school track, grandparents' education, and paternal work vary by society. The authors conclude that parents are important in both societies and that evidence for the notion that the more developed welfare state in Britain may substitute for capital at home in promoting children's home environments is weak.
Bibliography Citation
Campbell, Lori A. and Toby L. Parcel. "Children's Home Environments in Great Britain and the United States." Journal of Family Issues 31,5 (May 2010): 559-584.
6. Caputo, Richard K.
Grandparents and Coresident Grandchildren in a Youth Cohort
Journal of Family Issues 22,5 (July 2001): 541-556.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/22/5/541.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Grandchildren; Grandparents

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examined correlates of grandparent-grandchild coresidency in 1998, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Among parents 40 years of age or younger in 1998 (N = 5,019), 107 reported grandchildren in the same households. Compared with other parents, coresident grandparents were older, less educated, much younger at the time of the birth of their first child, and 2 to 4 times as likely to be female, single, Black, poor, and unemployed. The majority (81.3%) of coresident grandparents had one grandchild living with them. Only 5.5% lived in skipped-generation households.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Grandparents and Coresident Grandchildren in a Youth Cohort." Journal of Family Issues 22,5 (July 2001): 541-556.
7. Crockett, Lisa J.
Eggebeen, David J.
Hawkins, Alan J.
Fathers Presence and Young Children's Behavioral and Cognitive Adjustment
Journal of Family Issues 14,3 (September 1993): 355-377.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/14/3/355.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Coresidence; Family Structure; Fathers; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Biological; Hispanics; Maternal Employment; Parents, Single; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The present study examined the impact of the biological father on young children's cognitive and behavioral adjustment. Using data from the 1986 Child Supplement of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the relationship between father's coresidence in the household over the first 3 years of a child's life and children's adjustment was assessed for 1,688 four- to six-year-old children. Two dimensions of father-presence were considered, reflecting the timing of the father's entry into the household and the duration of his presence during the child's first 3 years of life. Within-group analyses of variance indicated significant effects of father-presence for White and Hispanic children and for children born to teenage and older mothers. All of these initial effects disappeared, however, once controls for child characteristics, maternal characteristics, and family resources were introduced in multiple regression models. These findings suggest that the father-effects operated through family characteristics and did not represent unique effects of fathering.
Bibliography Citation
Crockett, Lisa J., David J. Eggebeen and Alan J. Hawkins. "Fathers Presence and Young Children's Behavioral and Cognitive Adjustment." Journal of Family Issues 14,3 (September 1993): 355-377.
8. Davis, Shannon N.
Greenstein, Theodore N.
Interactive Effects of Gender Ideology and Age at First Marriage on Women's Marital Disruption
Journal of Family Issues 25,5 (July 2004): 658-683.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/25/5/658
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Attitudes; Divorce; Gender; Marital Disruption; Marriage; Sex Roles; Women's Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A sample of ever-married women from the NLSY79 is analyzed to examine the effects of age at first marriage and gender ideology on the likelihood of experiencing marital disruption. The authors hypothesize that age at first marriage will have no effect on the likelihood of experiencing marital disruption for non-traditional women, but that there will be a strong negative effect for traditional women. The authors use the log-rate model for piecewise-constant rates to estimate the log odds of respondents' hazard for experiencing a marital disruption separately for each of the three gender ideology groups. Findings suggest that age at first marriage affects women's likelihood of marital disruption contingent upon gender ideology. It is suggested that gender ideology is a lens through which women view the world and make decisions and that within each ideology category the factors that affect likelihood of divorce may differ as a result.
Bibliography Citation
Davis, Shannon N. and Theodore N. Greenstein. "Interactive Effects of Gender Ideology and Age at First Marriage on Women's Marital Disruption." Journal of Family Issues 25,5 (July 2004): 658-683.
9. Devor, Camron Suzann
Stewart, Susan D.
Dorius, Cassandra J.
Parental Divorce, Social Capital, and Postbaccalaureate Educational Attainment Among Young Adults
Journal of Family Issues 39,10 (July 2018): 2806-2835.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0192513X18760349
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Divorce; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Parental Influences; Parental Marital Status

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Educational attainment is lower among children with divorced parents than those with continuously married parents. Most research has focused on the educational outcomes of children and little research has examined the effect of parental divorce on educational attainment beyond a bachelor's degree. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, we investigated how parental divorce affects young adult postbaccalaureate educational attainment, measured by graduate/professional school enrollment and attainment of a graduate/professional degree. We also examined the role of social capital, measured by parental educational expectations. Parental divorce was negatively associated with enrolling in a graduate/professional program and obtaining a degree. Parental educational expectations were positively related to children's postbaccalaureate educational attainment, but the expectations of divorced and continuously married parents were similar and did not explain the negative effect of parental divorce. More work is needed to investigate explanations for lower postbaccalaureate educational attainment among children of divorce.
Bibliography Citation
Devor, Camron Suzann, Susan D. Stewart and Cassandra J. Dorius. "Parental Divorce, Social Capital, and Postbaccalaureate Educational Attainment Among Young Adults." Journal of Family Issues 39,10 (July 2018): 2806-2835.
10. Garbarski, Dana
Witt, Whitney
Child Health, Maternal Marital and Socioeconomic Factors, and Maternal Health
Journal of Family Issues 34,4 (April 2013): 484-509.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/34/4/484.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health, Limiting Condition(s); Depression (see also CESD); Health, Chronic Conditions; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Health; Poverty; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although maternal socioeconomic status and health predict in part children’s future health and socioeconomic prospects, it is possible that the intergenerational association flows in the other direction such that child health affects maternal outcomes. Previous research demonstrates that poor child health increases the risk of adverse maternal physical and mental health outcomes. The authors hypothesize that poor child health may also increase the risk of poor maternal health outcomes through an interaction between child health and factors associated with health outcomes, such as marital status, marital quality, and socioeconomic status. Using data on women in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979 cohort (N = 2,279), the authors find evidence that the effects of certain maternal marital quality and socioeconomic factors on maternal physical and mental health depend on child health status and vice versa.
Bibliography Citation
Garbarski, Dana and Whitney Witt. "Child Health, Maternal Marital and Socioeconomic Factors, and Maternal Health." Journal of Family Issues 34,4 (April 2013): 484-509.
11. Gillespie, Brian Joseph
Treas, Judith A.
Adolescent Intergenerational Cohesiveness and Young Adult Proximity to Mothers
Journal of Family Issues 38,6 (April 2017): 798-819.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0192513X15598548
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Modeling, Probit; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We consider how mother–child cohesion in adolescence relates to geographic proximity in young adulthood. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (N = 3,985), ordered probit models the association between adolescents' emotional closeness to mother and subsequent residential distance, controlling for key factors. Young people "at risk" of living at a distance (i.e., who have left the parental home) may be characterized by poorer relationships with parents. To take account of potential selection bias, two-stage Heckit models address spatial proximity as it relates to the choice to live with parents. The results suggest that emotional closeness to mother is robustly associated with later spatial proximity. The finding holds controlling for family structure, which is often taken as proxy for relationship quality. Although emotional closeness figures in the decision to leave home and move away, we do not find that selection out of coresidence biases the results for geographic proximity.
Bibliography Citation
Gillespie, Brian Joseph and Judith A. Treas. "Adolescent Intergenerational Cohesiveness and Young Adult Proximity to Mothers." Journal of Family Issues 38,6 (April 2017): 798-819.
12. Goldscheider, Frances Kobrin
Hofferth, Sandra L.
Spearin, Carrie E.
Curtin, Sally C.
Fatherhood Across Two Generations
Journal of Family Issues 30,5 (May 2009): 586-604.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/30/5/586.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Disadvantaged, Economically; Educational Attainment; Family Structure; Fatherhood; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Presence; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the determinants of men's early parental roles, distinguishing factors that affect being a father versus being childless, and factors that affect being a resident versus a nonresident father, in the context of having a partner or not. We also consider whether these patterns have changed between 1985 and 2004. The data come from the linked Child-Mother and Young Adult Samples of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), which provide information on the children of the NLSY79 from birth until they enter young adulthood, and from the original youth sample of parallel ages. The results support previous research showing the importance of economic and educational disadvantages and nontraditional family structure on being a nonresident father. The effects of family structure appear to have attenuated between generations as determinants of men's early parental roles. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Goldscheider, Frances Kobrin, Sandra L. Hofferth, Carrie E. Spearin and Sally C. Curtin. "Fatherhood Across Two Generations." Journal of Family Issues 30,5 (May 2009): 586-604.
13. Goosby, Bridget J.
Poverty Duration, Maternal Psychological Resources, and Adolescent Socioemotional Outcomes
Journal of Family Issues 28,8 (August 2007): 1113-1134.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/28/8/1113.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Census of Population; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Poverty; Depression (see also CESD); Pearlin Mastery Scale; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study seeks to assess the impact of maternal psychological well-being on the depression and anxiety levels and social withdrawal in a sample of young African American and Caucasian adolescents between the ages of 10 and 14 (N = 854) using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 child sample. Analyses using structural equation modeling found (a) that the duration of time mothers spend in poverty strongly predicts maternal mastery and depressive symptoms and (b) that the effects of poverty duration on adolescent outcomes are mediated primarily by maternal depression and sense of mastery even after controlling for parenting behavior and other familial background characteristics.
Bibliography Citation
Goosby, Bridget J. "Poverty Duration, Maternal Psychological Resources, and Adolescent Socioemotional Outcomes." Journal of Family Issues 28,8 (August 2007): 1113-1134.
14. Greenstein, Theodore N.
Are the "Most Advantaged" Children Truly Disadvantaged By Early Maternal Employment? Effects on Child Cognitive Outcomes
Journal of Family Issues 16,2 (March 1995): 149-169.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/16/2/149.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Children, Preschool; Children, School-Age; Cognitive Development; Household Income; Income; Maternal Employment; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examined the effects of early maternal employment on the cognitive ability of 2,040 4-6 year old children drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Some scholars have hypothesized that it is the most advantaged of society's children who are negatively affected by early maternal employment. If this is true, advantages such as high levels of cognitive stimulation in the home or household income should not affect cognitive ability as strongly for children of mothers who were employed during early childhood as they do for children whose mothers were not employed. Of 24 possible interaction effects that would confirm this hypothesis, only 1 is significant and not completely consistent with the hypothesis. In terms of effects on cognitive outcomes, the most advantaged children are not disproportionately disadvantaged by early maternal employment. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1995 American Psychological Association, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Greenstein, Theodore N. "Are the "Most Advantaged" Children Truly Disadvantaged By Early Maternal Employment? Effects on Child Cognitive Outcomes." Journal of Family Issues 16,2 (March 1995): 149-169.
15. Greenstein, Theodore N.
Human Capital, Marital and Birth Timing, and the Postnatal Labor Force Participation of Married Women
Journal of Family Issues 10,3 (September 1989): 359-382.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/10/3/359.abstract
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Birth Rate; Educational Attainment; First Birth; Human Capital Theory; Labor Force Participation; Marriage; Racial Differences; Wives, Income; Women; Work Experience; Work Reentry

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

An examination of how human capital factors (education, income, and prebirth labor force experience) and marriage and birth timing factors (marriage rates, childbirth rates, intervals between marriage and childbirth) affect female labor force participation and labor force reentry after childbirth, based on a review of the literature and data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience of Young Women, conducted by the US Bureau of the Census between 1968 and 1985 (N = 736 married women). Survival and three proportional hazards analyses show that prebirth work experience, prestigious occupation, being black, early age at marriage, early age at first birth, favorable attitudes toward working wives, high educational levels, high wife's income, and husband's low income, all contributed to early reentry to the paid labor force. Human capital factors had more effect on reentry than timing factors: high levels on human capital factors meant a much quicker return to the work force after the first birth, even if offset by marriage and birth timing factors that tend to delay reentry (eg, late marriage, late birth, and long interval between marriage and birth). Policy implications of these results are discussed. 2 Tables, 35 References. (Copyright 1990, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Greenstein, Theodore N. "Human Capital, Marital and Birth Timing, and the Postnatal Labor Force Participation of Married Women." Journal of Family Issues 10,3 (September 1989): 359-382.
16. Greenstein, Theodore N.
Maternal Employment and Child Behavioral Outcomes - A Household Economics Analysis
Journal of Family Issues 14,3 (September 1993): 323-354.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/14/3/323.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Child Care; Education; Family Income; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Maternal Employment; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research employs the household economics approach to study the effects of maternal employment and substitute child care on the social behavior of a national sample of 4- and 5-year-old children. Mothers from the National Longitudinal Survey's youth cohort were asked to rate their child's social behavior using items from the Behavioral Problems Index. The household economics approach predicts that behavioral outcomes for children of employed mothers will differ from those of children whose mothers were not employed to the extent that the substitution of market goods and services for nonmarket goods and services is imperfect. The study tests three hypotheses analyzing the interactions of family income and emotional support level with indicators of maternal employment and use of substitute child care. In general, the findings do not support the contention that maternal employment is associated with negative behavioral outcomes for young children. The findings of this and related studies suggest redirecting the research agenda on maternal employment and families to include analyses of the beneficial aspects of maternal employment for child well-being and to develop policies designed to promote the well-being of children with employed parents.
Bibliography Citation
Greenstein, Theodore N. "Maternal Employment and Child Behavioral Outcomes - A Household Economics Analysis." Journal of Family Issues 14,3 (September 1993): 323-354.
17. Hango, Darcy William
Houseknecht, Sharon K.
Marital Disruption and Accidents/Injuries Among Children
Journal of Family Issues 26,1 (January 2005): 3-32.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/26/1/3.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Accidents; Child Health; Children, Well-Being; Gender Differences; Household Income; Injuries; Marital Disruption; Mothers and Daughters; Parenting Skills/Styles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A vast literature has examined the effects of marital disruption on child well-being, however medically attended childhood accidents/injuries have not been considered as an outcome. This article investigates this association as well as possible intervening pathways using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-linked mother-child file. Findings reveal that marital disruption decreases girls' accidents/injuries. Boys are not directly affected. Parenting practices, childhood aggression, and mprecipitous drops in household income appear to do little to the relationship between marital disruption and childhood accidents/injuries for boys. For girls, however, the potential benefits of a marital disruption are suppressed until considering mother's use of discipline and household income decline. Results are discussed in terms of stress theory and the effect of mother-daughter versus mother-son dynamics following marital disruption. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Hango, Darcy William and Sharon K. Houseknecht. "Marital Disruption and Accidents/Injuries Among Children." Journal of Family Issues 26,1 (January 2005): 3-32.
18. Hendrix, Joshua A.
Parcel, Toby L.
Parental Nonstandard Work, Family Processes, and Delinquency During Adolescence
Journal of Family Issues 35,10 (August 2014): 1363-1393.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/35/10/1363.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parents, Single; Shift Workers; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although past research suggests that nonstandard parental work arrangements have negative implications for children, researchers typically assess the effects of maternal and paternal work schedules independently, and studies among older adolescents are rare. Combining insights from family sociology and criminology, we evaluate the effects of household work arrangements on family processes and delinquency among a national sample of 10- to 17-year-old children. We find that children from households where both parents work nonstandard hours report weaker levels of family bonding, which in turn is associated with greater delinquency. Children from single-mother households in which the mother works evening or night shifts report weaker levels of parent–child closeness and family bonding, which fully mediate the association with greater delinquency. We also find that select maternal nonstandard schedules in conjunction with paternal standard schedules are associated with lower delinquency among children. We derive implications for parental work schedules in households with adolescents.
Bibliography Citation
Hendrix, Joshua A. and Toby L. Parcel. "Parental Nonstandard Work, Family Processes, and Delinquency During Adolescence." Journal of Family Issues 35,10 (August 2014): 1363-1393.
19. Kim, Minseop
Ali, Samira
Kim, Hyun Suk
Parental Nonstandard Work Schedules, Parent-Child Communication, and Adolescent Substance Use
Journal of Family Issues 37,4 (March 2016): 466-493.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/37/4/466.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Maternal Employment; Modeling, Structural Equation; Parent-Child Interaction; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Shift Workers; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of this study was to examine the cumulative impact of parental nonstandard work schedules (NWS) on adolescent alcohol and cigarette use, with a focus on the mediating role of parent-child communication. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and its Child Supplement, our path analyses revealed that (a) parental NWS affected adolescent alcohol and cigarette use via the openness of parent-child communication rather than the frequency of parent-child communication and (b) the pattern and directionality of the mediating effects differed by who worked NWS, when parents worked NWS, and what types of NWS parents worked. Implications and directions for future studies are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Minseop, Samira Ali and Hyun Suk Kim. "Parental Nonstandard Work Schedules, Parent-Child Communication, and Adolescent Substance Use." Journal of Family Issues 37,4 (March 2016): 466-493.
20. King, Valarie
Nonresidential Father Involvement and Child Well-Being: Can Dads Make a Difference?
Journal of Family Issues 15,1 (March 1994): 78-96.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/15/1/78.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Child Support; Children, Well-Being; College Education; Fathers, Absence; Modeling; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Self-Esteem; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the child supplement to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), I test, through a series of multivariate regression models, whether father visitation or the payment of child support is significantly associated with several measures of child well-being. The results indicate that there is only limited evidence to support the hypothesis that nonresidential father involvement has positive benefits for children. The strongest evidence is for the effect of child support in the domain of academics.
Bibliography Citation
King, Valarie. "Nonresidential Father Involvement and Child Well-Being: Can Dads Make a Difference?" Journal of Family Issues 15,1 (March 1994): 78-96.
21. Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Dunifon, Rachel
Children's Home Environments: Understanding the Role of Family Structure Changes
Journal of Family Issues 25,1 (January 2004): 3-28.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/25/1/3.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Child Development; Divorce; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Structure; Gender Differences; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 1996 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) merged mother-child sample, we investigate the impact of two family events, parental divorce and the birth of a sibling, on the cognitive stimulation and emotional support provided to children in the home. We use fixed-effect regression techniques to control for unmeasured mother- and child-specific characteristics and measure responses to these family changes before, during, and after the events. We find that an impending birth is associated with increased emotional support provided to children, whereas concurrent births are associated with decreased support. Additionally, we find that, after controlling for unmeasured variables, divorce does not have an adverse effect on the home environments of boys and girls; in fact, a divorce occurring in a previous time period is associated with a modest increase in emotional support provided to girls. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori and Rachel Dunifon. "Children's Home Environments: Understanding the Role of Family Structure Changes." Journal of Family Issues 25,1 (January 2004): 3-28.
22. Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan
Raley, R. Kelly
Is It All About Money? Work Characteristics and Women’s and Men’s Marriage Formation in Early Adulthood
Journal of Family Issues 37,8 (June 2016): 1046-1073.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/37/8/1046.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Control; Earnings; Family Formation; Marital Status; Marriage; Occupational Information Network (O*NET)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 97, this article investigates how work characteristics (earnings and autonomy) shape young adults' transition to first marriage separately for men and women. The results suggest that earnings are positively associated with marriage and that this association is as strong for women as men in their mid to late 20s. Additionally, occupational autonomy—having the control over one's own work structure—facilitates entry into first marriage for women in their mid to late 20s but, for men, occupational autonomy is not associated with marriage at these ages. These results suggest that even as women's earnings are increasingly important for marriage, other aspects of work are also important for stable family formation.
Bibliography Citation
Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan and R. Kelly Raley. "Is It All About Money? Work Characteristics and Women’s and Men’s Marriage Formation in Early Adulthood." Journal of Family Issues 37,8 (June 2016): 1046-1073.
23. Leibbrand, Christine
Flexibility or Constraint? The Implications of Mothers' and Fathers' Nonstandard Schedules for Children’s Behavioral Outcomes
Journal of Family Issues 39,8 (June 2018): 2336-2365.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0192513X17748693
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Behavioral Development; Parental Influences; Shift Workers; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Approximately 17.7% of the U.S. workforce is employed in a nonstandard schedule. Research thus far indicates that these schedules negatively influence children's behavioral development. However, few studies examine the roles of the child's gender and age. To broaden understanding of the relationships between nonstandard schedules and child behavior, and how these relationships may depend on the gender and age of the child, I analyze data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 and its Child Supplement from 1992 to 2006. My findings show that some types of parental nonstandard shifts, such as evening and night shifts, are associated with fewer behavioral problems among children, though these results depend on the gender and age of the child. In contrast, parents' rotating and split shifts are associated with more behavior problems among children, indicating that it is relatively unstable and unpredictable work schedules that may have the most harmful associations with children's outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Leibbrand, Christine. "Flexibility or Constraint? The Implications of Mothers' and Fathers' Nonstandard Schedules for Children’s Behavioral Outcomes." Journal of Family Issues 39,8 (June 2018): 2336-2365.
24. Lichter, Daniel T.
Anderson, Robert N.
Hayward, Mark D.
Marriage Markets and Marital Choice
Journal of Family Issues 16,4 (July 1995): 412-431.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/16/4/412.refs
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Demography; Family Characteristics; Marriage; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Racial Studies; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wages, Reservation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the relationship between marriage market conditions and marital choice (i.e., assortative mating). The guiding hypothesis is that shortages of attractive mates not only lower the probability of marriage, but in the event of marriage, also alter never-married women's "reservation-quality spouse" (i.e., akin to reservation wage in job search theory). To the extent that marital pros never-married women are more likely to: (1) marry men with characteristics to their own as they expand the pool of eligible mates; and (2) marry socioeconomic status. We test this hypothesis using data from the National Survey of Youth. Our discrete-time competing risk hazards models pit micro explanations that emphasize women's personal resources against structural explanations that emphasize local marriage market constraints in the mate selection process.
Bibliography Citation
Lichter, Daniel T., Robert N. Anderson and Mark D. Hayward. "Marriage Markets and Marital Choice." Journal of Family Issues 16,4 (July 1995): 412-431.
25. Lleras, Christy
Employment, Work Conditions, and the Home Environment in Single-Mother Families
Journal of Family Issues 29,10 (October 2008): 1268-1297.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/29/10/1268.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Children, Preschool; Family Size; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Parents, Single; Shift Workers; Welfare; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigates the impact of employment status and work conditions on the quality of the home environment provided by single mothers of preschool-age children. Multivariate analyses were conducted using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The results indicate that employment status is not a significant predictor of the quality of the home environment among single mothers of young children when family size and welfare use are controlled. Among single working mothers, several job conditions were related to the quality of the home environment. Single mothers who were employed part-time and in low-wage jobs had significantly poorer home environments. Single mothers who work nonstandard hours generally have poorer home environments, with the exception of rotating shifts. These findings highlight the importance of examining the effects of employment status and job conditions on within-group differences in the quality of the home environment among single-mother families. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Family Issues is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Lleras, Christy. "Employment, Work Conditions, and the Home Environment in Single-Mother Families." Journal of Family Issues 29,10 (October 2008): 1268-1297.
26. Lynn, Freda B.
Schneider, Barbara
Zhang, Zhenmei
The Changing Relationship Between Fertility Expectations and Educational Expectations: Adolescents in the 1970s Versus the 1980s
Journal of Family Issues 34,9 (September 2013): 1147-1174.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/34/9/1147.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Expectations/Intentions; Fertility; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the relationship between young women’s fertility expectations and educational expectations in late adolescence and at the outset of adulthood. Given progressive macro-level changes in the United States beginning in the 1960s, we compare the expectation patterns of youth from two cohorts using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys. We find that the relationship between education and fertility expectations is statistically negligible for those born in the height of the baby boom (1950s) and yet statistically positive for those born at the tail end of the baby boom (1960s). The crux of the change, however, is not driven by an increase in those who pair high educational expectations with normative or above-norm fertility expectations but rather an increase in young women who pair modest educational ambitions with low fertility expectations.
Bibliography Citation
Lynn, Freda B., Barbara Schneider and Zhenmei Zhang. "The Changing Relationship Between Fertility Expectations and Educational Expectations: Adolescents in the 1970s Versus the 1980s ." Journal of Family Issues 34,9 (September 2013): 1147-1174.
27. Mizell, C. André
Steelman, Lala Carr
All My Children: The Consequences of Sibling Group Characteristics on the Marital Happiness of Young Mothers
Journal of Family Issues 21, 7 (October 2000): 858-887.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/21/7/858.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Birth Preferences/Birth Expectations; Brothers; Family Size; Family Structure; Fathers, Involvement; Gender Differences; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Siblings; Sisters

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this research, we investigate how children shape maternal marital happiness. The findings reveal that the otherwise negative effects of sibship size are altered by the gender composition of the sibling group. Having sons tends to reduce the negative impact of sibling group size. Solving for main effects in the interactions that include sibship size by the gender composition of the sibling group, we find that having all sons affords the most beneficial consequences for marital happiness. The daughter-only groups have nonsignificant effects, and the mixed-gender sibships have the most deleterious influence on maternal marital happiness. Within a subsample of mixed-gender sibships only, we further find that mothers who have more boys than girls are more likely to report higher marital gratification. Generally speaking, our research demonstrates the need to examine both main and interaction effects of family structure on marital happiness.
Bibliography Citation
Mizell, C. André and Lala Carr Steelman. "All My Children: The Consequences of Sibling Group Characteristics on the Marital Happiness of Young Mothers." Journal of Family Issues 21, 7 (October 2000): 858-887.
28. Morgan, Leslie A.
Economic Well-Being Following Marital Termination: A Comparison of Widowed and Divorced Women
Journal of Family Issues 10,1 (March 1989): 86-101.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/10/1/86.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Divorce; Marital Instability; Marital Status; Poverty; Transfers, Skill; Well-Being; Widows

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Separate studies of divorced and widowed women show increased odds of becoming poor following the termination of marriage. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal data suggest that the end of marriage is correlated with higher poverty rates. Less is known, however, about factors which influence economic well-being over time, and whether these factors are similar across the two types of marital transition. This analysis uses data from the NLS cohort of Mature Women (1967-1982) to examine the probability of becoming poor after widowhood or divorce among midlife women, and factors which influence economic well-being. Findings show that 40% of widows and over one quarter of divorced women fall into poverty for at least some time during the first five years after leaving marriage. The type of marital transition experienced by the women is not a significant factor in economic well-being, but both age and prior economic standing have positive effects.
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, Leslie A. "Economic Well-Being Following Marital Termination: A Comparison of Widowed and Divorced Women." Journal of Family Issues 10,1 (March 1989): 86-101.
29. Mott, Frank L.
Sons, Daughters and Fathers' Absence: Differentials in Father-Leaving Probabilities and in Home Environments
Journal of Family Issues 15,1 (March 1994): 97-128.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/15/1/97.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birthweight; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Biological; Fathers, Leaving; Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Income; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Education; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this research examines the extent to which the presence or absence of biological fathers from the home is associated with gender differences in the presence or absence of children and gender differences in the home environment encountered by children. For a large national sample of children between the ages of 5 and 9, the results suggest that for White families: (a) fathers are more likely to be present in the home if the child is male; and (b) home environmental advantages that boys appear to have in two-parent households are not apparent in female-headed households. For White families, White single parenthood is clearly linked with a poorer quality environment; nonetheless, it is more equalitarian in terms of boys and girls being similarly socialized. The results for Black children are less systematic, although there is some suggestion that girls lose a modest relative advantage in home environment that they have over boys in father-present homes.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Sons, Daughters and Fathers' Absence: Differentials in Father-Leaving Probabilities and in Home Environments." Journal of Family Issues 15,1 (March 1994): 97-128.
30. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Being an Only Child: Effects on Educational Progression and Career Orientation
Journal of Family Issues 3,4 (December 1982): 575-593.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/3/4/575.abstract
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior; Career Patterns; Children; Educational Attainment; Family Influences; I.Q.; Marriage; Pairs (also see Siblings); Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses data from the Young Men's and Young Women's cohorts of the NLS to measure the independent effects of sibling number and placement on a number of educational, family, career, and social-psychological outcomes as of age 24. In particular, the study compares separately for young men and women the effects of being an only child with being the older of two children as well as the general importance of coming from a smaller rather than a larger family. The authors conclude that, while confluence theory is frequently supported by the data for both sexes, the corollary tutoring hypothesis is generally only validated for young women. The authors conjecture that this sex discrepancy may reflect a greater likelihood that the tutoring role within the family may be substantially affectively based, thus making it an activity that is more likely to be associated with female intrafamily role behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Being an Only Child: Effects on Educational Progression and Career Orientation." Journal of Family Issues 3,4 (December 1982): 575-593.
31. Pace, Garrett T.
Shafer, Kevin M.
Parenting and Depression: Differences Across Parental Roles
Journal of Family Issues 36,8 (June 2015): 1001-1021.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/36/8/1001.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Children; Depression (see also CESD); Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenthood; Parenting Skills/Styles; Stepfamilies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Few empirical studies have examined the association between parenthood and psychological well-being. Using NLSY79 data (n = 6,297), we examined how various parental roles, or specific parent–child relationship types, were associated with depressive symptoms in adults. We hypothesized that less traditional and more complex parental roles would be associated with higher depressive symptoms. Ordinary least squares regression results revealed that having a stepchild was associated with higher depressive symptoms, regardless of the stepchild’s residential status. Additionally, certain combinations of parental roles were a risk factor for depressive symptoms, including having a biological child residing in the home and another biological child residing outside the home simultaneously, a biological child and a stepchild residing together (with or without a new biological child), and having more than two combined parental roles in general. Findings suggested certain parental roles are indeed associated with higher depressive symptoms, while others may be null relationships.
Bibliography Citation
Pace, Garrett T. and Kevin M. Shafer. "Parenting and Depression: Differences Across Parental Roles." Journal of Family Issues 36,8 (June 2015): 1001-1021.
32. Plotnick, Robert D.
Garfinkel, Irwin
McLanahan, Sara S.
Ku, Inhoe
Better Child Support Enforcement: Can It Reduce Teenage Premarital Childbearing?
Journal of Family Issues 25,5 (July 2004): 634-658.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=13470389&db=aph
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Child Support; Childbearing; Childbearing, Adolescent; Ethnic Differences; Fatherhood; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Sexual Behavior; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Stricter child support enforcement may reduce unwed childbearing by raising the costs of fatherhood. The authors investigate this hypothesis using a sample of young women from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, to which they add information on state child support enforcement. Models of the probability of a teenage premarital birth and of teenage premarital pregnancy and pregnancy resolution provide tentative evidence that during the early 1980s, teens living in states with higher rates of paternity establishment were less likely to become unwed mothers. This relationship is stronger for non-Hispanic Whites than for non-Hispanic Blacks. The findings suggest that policies that shift more costs of premarital childbearing to men may reduce this behavior, at least among non-Hispanic Whites. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Plotnick, Robert D., Irwin Garfinkel, Sara S. McLanahan and Inhoe Ku. "Better Child Support Enforcement: Can It Reduce Teenage Premarital Childbearing?" Journal of Family Issues 25,5 (July 2004): 634-658.
33. Rudd, Nancy M.
McKenry, Patrick C.
Nah, Myungkyun
Welfare Receipt Among Black and White Adolescent Mothers: A Longitudinal Perspective
Journal of Family Issues 11,3 (September 1990): 334-352.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/11/3/334.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Childbearing, Adolescent; Educational Attainment; Income; Labor Force Participation; Marital Status; Mothers, Adolescent; Parents, Single; Racial Differences; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the NLSY were analyzed to determine whether the impact of adolescent childbearing on women's subsequent contact with the welfare system differed for black and white women. Results of a path analysis indicate that there were distinctive differences between young black and white women in the way early childbearing influences welfare receipt over an eight-year period. These differences were not fully apparent unless both direct and indirect effects of predictor variables were taken into account.
Bibliography Citation
Rudd, Nancy M., Patrick C. McKenry and Myungkyun Nah. "Welfare Receipt Among Black and White Adolescent Mothers: A Longitudinal Perspective." Journal of Family Issues 11,3 (September 1990): 334-352.
34. Schmitz, Mark F.
Cultural and Acculturation Differences in Trajectories of Home Environment Inventory Scores for Latino Children and Families
Journal of Family Issues 26,5 (July 2005): 568-583.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/26/5/568.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at Birth; Children, Poverty; Ethnic Differences; Hispanics; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Immigrants; Interviewing Method; Language Problems; Modeling, Multilevel; Mothers, Education; Testing Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the influence of social context on the home environment for children aged 0 to 14 years, testing for differences between Cubans (n = 47),Mexicans (n = 240),Mexican Americans (n = 415), and Puerto Ricans (n = 162). Hierarchical linear models showed significant cultural and acculturation effects on the trajectories of cognitive stimulation and emotional support in the home environment. The home environment of families in which the mother reported more U.S. ancestry showed significant declines in cognitive stimulation, whereas families in which the mother was more likely to use Spanish during the study interview showed significant increases in cognitive stimulation as the child aged. In contrast, no significant acculturation effects were found for the trajectories of emotional support in the home.
Bibliography Citation
Schmitz, Mark F. "Cultural and Acculturation Differences in Trajectories of Home Environment Inventory Scores for Latino Children and Families." Journal of Family Issues 26,5 (July 2005): 568-583.
35. Shafer, Emily Fitzgibbons
The Effect of Marriage on Weight Gain and Propensity to Become Obese in the African American Community
Journal of Family Issues 31,9 (September 2010): 1166-1182.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/31/9/1166.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Gender Differences; Health Factors; Racial Differences; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Does marriage have a causal impact on weight and the likelihood of becoming obese? Marriage is thought to have a protective influence on both men's and women's health, although via different mechanisms. Evidence in regard to marriage affecting body mass index (BMI) and the propensity to become obese, however, is mixed and often based on limited data. Even less clear is whether the effect varies by race and gender. In this article, the author uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979), which has followed individuals for more than 20 years, and uses methods aimed at netting out selection bias to show that marriage is associated with a modest increase in BMI for all race and gender groups. Additionally, marriage is associated with an increase in the likelihood for becoming obese for African American women. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Shafer, Emily Fitzgibbons. "The Effect of Marriage on Weight Gain and Propensity to Become Obese in the African American Community." Journal of Family Issues 31,9 (September 2010): 1166-1182.
36. Shafer, Kevin M.
Unique Matching Patterns in Remarriage: Educational Assortative Mating Among Divorced Men and Women
Journal of Family Issues 34,11 (November 2013): 1500-1535.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/34/11/1500.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Education; Educational Attainment; Marriage; Remarriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Educational assortative mating is a crucial aspect of marriage formation because it confers benefits such as improved health and well-being, affects economic standing, and reflects the level of gender equity within marriage. However, little is known about educational assortative mating patterns in remarriage. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort, this study addresses this shortcoming in two ways. First, I compare educational assortative mating patterns in first and second marriages. Second, I address characteristics associated with homogamy, hypergamy, and hypogamy in remarriage. The results show that assortative mating patterns in remarriage are distinct from those in first marriage, remarriage patterns are unique by educational attainment and gender, and these patterns are not explained by differences in income, age, or parental status. The results illustrate the need for theories which specifically address the unique nature of remarriage in the United States.
Bibliography Citation
Shafer, Kevin M. "Unique Matching Patterns in Remarriage: Educational Assortative Mating Among Divorced Men and Women." Journal of Family Issues 34,11 (November 2013): 1500-1535.
37. Shaw, Lois B.
High School Completion for Young Women: Effects of Low Income and Living with a Single Parent. Also published as: Effects of Low Income and Living with a Single Parent
Journal of Family Issues 3,2 (June 1982): 147-163.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/3/2/147.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Dropouts; Educational Attainment; Family Resources; High School; Parental Influences; Parents, Single

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The increase in the proportion of married women in their late thirties exhibiting a strong attachment to the labor market is examined. An analysis of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience for the period 1966-1976 reveals that: (1) major factors influencing black women to become more stongly involved in the LF were fewer family duties, higher level of education, & improved health; (2) lessening family duties, expansion of work history, & evolving attitudes toward the role of women in society most strongly influenced white women in the market place; & (3) even larger increases could have been seen among both black & white women except for a general condition of high unemployment. Patterns describing future involvement of midlife women in the LF are proposed.
Bibliography Citation
Shaw, Lois B. "High School Completion for Young Women: Effects of Low Income and Living with a Single Parent. Also published as: Effects of Low Income and Living with a Single Parent." Journal of Family Issues 3,2 (June 1982): 147-163.
38. Smith, Chelsea
Family, Academic, and Peer Group Predictors of Adolescent Pregnancy Expectations and Young Adult Childbearing
Journal of Family Issues 39,4 (March 2018): 1008-1029.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0192513X16684894
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing, Adolescent; Expectations/Intentions; Parenthood; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Compared with previous generations, today's young people increasingly delay parenthood. Having children in the late teens and early 20s is thus a rarer experience rooted in and potentially leading to the stratification of American families. Understanding why some adolescents expect to do so can illuminate how stratification unfolds. Informed by theories of the life course, social control, and reasoned action, this study used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (n = 4,556) to explore outcomes and antecedents of adolescent pregnancy expectations with logistic regressions. Results indicated that those expectations--including neither low nor high (i.e., split) expectations--predicted subsequent childbearing. These apparently consequential expectations were, in turn, most closely associated with youth's academics and peer groups. These findings illustrate how different domains can intersect in the early life course to shape future prospects, and they emphasize split pregnancy expectations reported in a nationally representative sample of young women and men.
Bibliography Citation
Smith, Chelsea. "Family, Academic, and Peer Group Predictors of Adolescent Pregnancy Expectations and Young Adult Childbearing." Journal of Family Issues 39,4 (March 2018): 1008-1029.
39. South, Scott J.
Do You Need to Shop Around? Age at Marriage, Spousal Alternatives, and Marital Dissolution
Journal of Family Issues 16,4 (July 1995): 432-449.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/16/4/432.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Behavior; Demography; Divorce; Educational Attainment; Marital Dissolution; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Hypothesized that, relative to people who marry later in life, persons who marry at comparatively young ages will be especially susceptible to divorce when confronted with abundant alternatives to their current spouse. Data on 2,586 Ss, first interviewed in 1979 between the ages of 14-22 years, were obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of the Labor Market Experience of Youth and the Public Use Microdata Samples; 22% of Ss had experienced a marital dissolution. A discrete-time event-history analysis approach was used. Results show that local marriage markets containing favorable remarriage prospects for wives should increase the risk of divorce, as should a marriage market containing relatively favorable remarriage prospects for husbands and thus unfavorable prospects for wives. Some of the effect of age at marriage on marital dissolution is attributable to the detrimental impact of early marriage on educational attainment. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
South, Scott J. "Do You Need to Shop Around? Age at Marriage, Spousal Alternatives, and Marital Dissolution." Journal of Family Issues 16,4 (July 1995): 432-449.
40. Spitze, Glenna D.
South, Scott J.
Women's Employment, Time Expenditure and Divorce
Journal of Family Issues 6 (1985): 307-239
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Divorce; Earnings, Wives; Household Demand; Husbands, Attitudes; Marital Instability; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Past research on the relationship between wives' employment and divorce has focused on two types of explanations, those positing change motives regarding divorce and those suggesting changed opportunities. Without discounting totally the path from income to opportunity, we focus here on a somewhat neglected alternative, that leading from time constraints to changed motives toward maintaining a marriage. We argue that time spent by the wife working outside the home impedes the completion of tasks necessary to the maintenance of the household, and hence increases the probability of divorce. Using data from the Young and Mature Women samples of the NLS, we find that among employed women, hours worked has a greater impact on marital dissolution than do various measures of wife's earnings. In partial support of our hypotheses, the relationship between wife's hours worked and the probability of divorce is strongest for middle income families and families in which the husband disapproves of his wife's employment.
Bibliography Citation
Spitze, Glenna D. and Scott J. South. "Women's Employment, Time Expenditure and Divorce." Journal of Family Issues 6 (1985): 307-239.
41. Sugland, Barbara W.
Zaslow, Martha J.
Smith, Judith R.
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
The Early Childhood HOME Inventory and HOME-Short Form in Differing Racial/Ethnic Groups: Are There Differences in Underlying Structure, Internal Consistency of Subscales, and Patterns of Prediction?
Journal of Family Issues 16,5 (September 1995): 632-663.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/16/5/632.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Child Health; Children; Children, Home Environment; Cognitive Development; Ethnic Differences; Ethnic Groups; Holland's Typology; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Infants; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Preschool Children; Racial Differences; Racial Studies; Scale Construction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examined differences across European-, African-, and Hispanic-American subgroups on the psychometric properties of the Early Childhood HOME (Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment) Inventory and the HOME-Short Form and the prediction of these 2 versions to cognitive and socioemotional outcomes among preschool children. Data are taken from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement (n = 1,541 children aged 3-5.9 yrs) and the Infant Health and Development Program (n = 985 low birth weight infants assessed at 12, 24, and 36 mo). Findings suggest few racial/ethnic differences in the psychometric properties of either version of the HOME scale. Both versions showed better prediction of cognitive child outcomes for all 3 racial/ethnic groups as well as better prediction of child outcomes generally for European-American than for Hispanic- and African-American families. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved).
Bibliography Citation
Sugland, Barbara W., Martha J. Zaslow, Judith R. Smith and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "The Early Childhood HOME Inventory and HOME-Short Form in Differing Racial/Ethnic Groups: Are There Differences in Underlying Structure, Internal Consistency of Subscales, and Patterns of Prediction?" Journal of Family Issues 16,5 (September 1995): 632-663.
42. Teachman, Jay D.
Body Weight, Marital Status, and Changes in Marital Status
Journal of Family Issues 37,1 (January 2016): 74-96.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/37/1/74.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Cohabitation; Divorce; Marital Status; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this article, I use 20 years of data taken from the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth to examine the relationship between body weight and both marital status and changes in marital status. I use a latent growth curve model that allows both fixed and random effects. The results show that living without a partner, either being divorced or never married, is associated with lower body weight. Cohabitors and married respondents tend to weigh more. Marital transitions also matter but only for divorce. Gender does not appear to moderate these results.
Bibliography Citation
Teachman, Jay D. "Body Weight, Marital Status, and Changes in Marital Status." Journal of Family Issues 37,1 (January 2016): 74-96.
43. Teachman, Jay D.
Military Service, Race, and the Transition to Marriage and Cohabitation
Journal of Family Issues 30,10 (October 2009): 1433-1454.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/30/10/1433.short
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Marriage; Military Personnel; Military Service; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth, the author investigates the relationship between military service and the transition to the first intimate union. The author argues that active-duty military service promotes marriage over cohabitation. The results are consistent with this argument, showing that active-duty members of the military are much more likely to choose marriage over cohabitation compared to reserve-duty service members, veterans, and comparable civilians. These results are particularly strong for Black men, indicating a possible relationship between working in a largely race-neutral environment and the choice of first intimate union.
Bibliography Citation
Teachman, Jay D. "Military Service, Race, and the Transition to Marriage and Cohabitation." Journal of Family Issues 30,10 (October 2009): 1433-1454.
44. Teachman, Jay D.
Wives’ Economic Resources and Risk of Divorce
Journal of Family Issues 31,10 (October 2010): 1305-1323.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/31/10/1305
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Divorce; Economic Well-Being; Income; Labor Force Participation; Marriage; Wives

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using longitudinal data covering 25 years from 1979 to 2004, the author examines the relationship between wives’ economic resources and the risk of marital dissolution. The author considers the effects of labor force participation, income, and relative income while accounting for potential endogeneity of wives’ economic resources. The extent to which wives’ economic resources are differentially related to marital disruption for Whites and Blacks is also ascertained. The author finds that the economic resources of women are tightly linked to the risk of divorce, both negatively and positively, for Whites but not for Blacks.
Bibliography Citation
Teachman, Jay D. "Wives’ Economic Resources and Risk of Divorce." Journal of Family Issues 31,10 (October 2010): 1305-1323.
45. Tumin, Dmitry
Qian, Zhenchao
Unemployment and the Transition From Separation to Divorce
Journal of Family Issues 38,10 (July 2017): 1389-1413.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0192513X15600730
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Divorce; Gender Differences; Marital Disruption; Marital Status; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Informal marital separation often quickly leads to divorce, but can become long-lasting, especially among disadvantaged populations. In this study, we focus on the timing of divorce after separating and examine how unemployment before or during separation affects this pivotal moment in the divorce process. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort (N = 2,219), we track unemployment before and during separation and show that men's unemployment during separation, rather than women's, reduces the likelihood of divorce, independent of preseparation unemployment and other characteristics. For men, unemployment during a marital separation prolongs the divorce process, creating an extended period of uncertainty in marital relationships on the brink of dissolution. We discuss the gendered relationship observed between employment status during an informal separation and an estranged couple's decision to complete the divorce process.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry and Zhenchao Qian. "Unemployment and the Transition From Separation to Divorce." Journal of Family Issues 38,10 (July 2017): 1389-1413.
46. Weinshenker, Matthew
The Effect of Fatherhood on Employment Hours: Variation by Birth Timing, Marriage, and Coresidence
Journal of Family Issues 36,1 (January 2015): 3-30.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/36/1/3.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Fatherhood; First Birth; Marital Status; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Drawing on the life course paradigm, I assess how the effect of fatherhood on employment hours varies by age of becoming a parent and time elapsed since the birth. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort from 1979 to 2002 (N = 28,514 observations), separate effects are estimated based on fathers' marital status and coresidence with own children. Only unmarried men who became fathers before 24 years work longer hours immediately after a first birth, but in the long run, most early fathers work fewer hours as a result of parenthood. Over time, unmarried but coresident men who became fathers between 24 and 29 years increase their hours, as do married, coresident men who delayed fatherhood until 30 years or older. However, the latter increase is moderated by support for egalitarian gender roles. The findings shed light on the contemporary transition to adulthood and on men's work-family balance.
Bibliography Citation
Weinshenker, Matthew. "The Effect of Fatherhood on Employment Hours: Variation by Birth Timing, Marriage, and Coresidence." Journal of Family Issues 36,1 (January 2015): 3-30.
47. Winslow-Bowe, Sarah E.
Husbands' and Wives' Relative Earnings: Exploring Variation by Race, Human Capital, Labor Supply, and Life Stage
Journal of Family Issues 30,10 (October 2009): 1405-1432.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/30/10/1405.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Human Capital; Labor Supply; Marriage; Racial Differences; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Whereas much research has explored the causes and consequences of the gender wage gap, far less has examined earnings differentials within marriage. This article contributes to this literature by utilizing the 2000 wave of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine variation in husbands' and wives' relative income by race/ethnicity, human capital, labor supply, and life stage. The author finds that Black women's disproportionate concentration among high relative earning wives can be attributed more to their greater attachment to paid labor than to their husbands' labor supply. Nonetheless, Black women's odds of earning as much as or more than their husbands are greater than those of White women. In addition, unlike research on the motherhood wage gap more generally, the author finds that the impact of motherhood on women's earnings relative to their husbands can be largely explained by mothers' lower labor supply relative to their childless counterparts.
Bibliography Citation
Winslow-Bowe, Sarah E. "Husbands' and Wives' Relative Earnings: Exploring Variation by Race, Human Capital, Labor Supply, and Life Stage." Journal of Family Issues 30,10 (October 2009): 1405-1432.