Search Results

Source: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Resulting in 39 citations.
1. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Peralta, Robert L.
The Gender Gap in Alcohol Consumption during Late Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Gendered Attitudes and Adult Roles
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,4 (December 2009): 410-426.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/50/4/410.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Employment; Family Influences; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Gender Differences; Genetics; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Marriage; Parenthood; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We utilize data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth young adult sample (N = 1,488) to investigate whether gender role attitudes and the occupation of and transition to three adult roles (i.e., employment, marriage, and parenthood) contribute to the maintenance of the gender gap in the frequency and quantity of alcohol use. Our results indicate that traditional gender role attitudes are related to less frequent drinking for both men and women, but role attitudes are not associated with the number of drinks consumed. We also find that employment and transitions to employment increase the frequency and quantity of drinking, but less so for women compared to men. Furthermore, marriage, parenthood, and transitions to parenthood are related to less frequent drinking for women only. In terms of the number of drinks consumed, only employment and transitions to employment distinguish men and women. Employment is related to increased quantity of drinking for men, but decreased drinking for women, while transitions to employment have no effect on men, but do decrease the amount of drinking for women. Marriage decreases the number of drinks consumed equally for both men and women. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André and Robert L. Peralta. "The Gender Gap in Alcohol Consumption during Late Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Gendered Attitudes and Adult Roles." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,4 (December 2009): 410-426.
2. Dooley, David
Prause, JoAnn
Birth Weight and Mothers' Adverse Employment Change
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 46,2 (June 2005): 141-155.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/46/2/141.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Maternal Employment; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Underemployment; Unemployment; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Low birth weight has been linked at the aggregate level to unemployment rates and at the individual level to subjective distress. It was hypothesized that maternal underemployment, including unemployment, involuntary part time work, and low wage work, would predict decreased birth weight. The relationship of birth weight to maternal employment changes during pregnancy was studied prospectively in 1165 singleton first births in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data set. Controlling for other significant risk factors, women who shifted from adequate employment to underemployment had significantly lighter babies. Plausible mediators of this relationship were explored including prenatal health care, gestational age, and mother weight gain with results varying by type of underemployment. Two interactions also suggested that underemployment reduced the beneficial effect of mother weight gain on birth weight. These findings were partially replicated for low birth weight (<2500 grams) indicating the medical significance of the effect.
Bibliography Citation
Dooley, David and JoAnn Prause. "Birth Weight and Mothers' Adverse Employment Change." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 46,2 (June 2005): 141-155.
3. Dooley, David
Prause, JoAnn
Ham-Rowbottom, Kathleen A.
Underemployment and Depression: Longitudinal Relationships
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 41,4 (December 2000): 421-436.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2676295
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Education; Employment, Part-Time; Health, Mental; Income; Job Satisfaction; Marital Status; Part-Time Work; Underemployment; Unemployment; Wage Rates

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We conceptualize employment status not as a dichotomy of working versus not working but as a continuum ranging from adequate employment to inadequate employment (involuntary part-time or low wage) to unemployment. Will shifts from adequate to inadequate employment increase depression as do shifts from employment to unemployment, and to what extent does prior depression select workers into such adverse employment change? We analyze panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for the years 1992-1994 for the 5,113 respondents who were adequately employed in 1992. Controlling for prior depression, both types of adverse employment change resulted in similar significant increases in depression. These direct effects persisted despite inclusion of such potential mediators as changes in income, job satisfaction, and marital status. Marital status buffered the depressive effect of both types of adverse change, but education and job dissatisfaction amplified the effect of unemployment on depression. Prior depression did not predict higher risk of becoming inadequately employed but did predict increased risk of unemployment, particularly for those with less education. These results confirm that both unemployment and inadequate employment affect mental health, and they invite greater efforts to monitor the extent and impact of underemployment.
Bibliography Citation
Dooley, David, JoAnn Prause and Kathleen A. Ham-Rowbottom. "Underemployment and Depression: Longitudinal Relationships." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 41,4 (December 2000): 421-436.
4. Frech, Adrianne
Damaske, Sarah
The Relationships between Mothers’ Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 53,4 (December 2012): 396-412.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/53/4/396.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): First Birth; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Life Course; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We contribute to research on the relationships between gender, work, and health by using longitudinal, theoretically driven models of mothers’ diverse work pathways and adjusting for unequal selection into these pathways. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Youth-1979 (N = 2,540), we find full-time, continuous employment following a first birth is associated with significantly better health at age 40 than part-time work, paid work interrupted by unemployment, and unpaid work in the home. Part-time workers with little unemployment report significantly better health at age 40 than mothers experiencing persistent unemployment. These relationships remain after accounting for the unequal selection of more advantaged mothers into full-time, continuous employment, suggesting full-time workers benefit from cumulating advantages across the life course and reiterating the need to disentangle health benefits associated with work from those associated with pre-pregnancy characteristics.
Bibliography Citation
Frech, Adrianne and Sarah Damaske. "The Relationships between Mothers’ Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 53,4 (December 2012): 396-412.
5. Garbarski, Dana
The Interplay between Child and Maternal Health: Reciprocal Relationships and Cumulative Disadvantage during Childhood and Adolescence
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 55,1 (March 2014): 91-106.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/55/1/91.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health, Limiting Condition(s); Depression (see also CESD); Health Factors; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Health

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While many studies use parental socioeconomic status and health to predict children’s health, this study examines the interplay over time between child and maternal health across childhood and adolescence. Using data from women in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979 cohort and their children (N = 2,225), autoregressive cross-lagged models demonstrate a reciprocal relationship between child activity limitations and maternal health limitations in direct effects of child activity limitations on maternal health limitations two years later and vice versa—net of a range of health-relevant time-varying and time-invariant covariates. Furthermore, there are indirect effects of child activity limitations on subsequent maternal health limitations and indirect effects of maternal health limitations on subsequent child activity limitations via intervening health statuses. This study examines how the interplay between child and maternal health unfolds over time and describes how these interdependent statuses jointly experience health disadvantages.
Bibliography Citation
Garbarski, Dana. "The Interplay between Child and Maternal Health: Reciprocal Relationships and Cumulative Disadvantage during Childhood and Adolescence." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 55,1 (March 2014): 91-106.
6. Haas, Steven A.
Fosse, Nathan Edward
Health and the Educational Attainment of Adolescents: Evidence from the NLSY97
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 49,2 (June 2008): 178-192.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/49/2/178.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Accidents; Bullying/Victimization; Cognitive Development; Educational Attainment; Family Characteristics; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; High School Completion/Graduates; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Logit; Psychological Effects; Schooling, Post-secondary; Siblings; Socioeconomic Factors; Teenagers; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the mechanisms linking health to the educational attainment of adolescents. In particular, it investigates the role of cognitive/academic achievement and a variety of psychosocial adjustment factors in explaining this relationship. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (NLSY97), we estimate models of timely high school completion and of post-secondary enrollment using both standard logit estimation and sibling fixed-effects models. We find that, net of sociodemographic background and stable unobserved family characteristics, adolescents who experience worse health are substantially less likely to complete high school by their 20th birthday and to transition to post-secondary education. Cognitive/academic achievement and psychosocial factors appear to explain a large portion of these health-related educational deficits. However, adolescent health continues to be significantly associated with these key educational transitions. The findings highlight a potentially important role of health selection processes in generating socioeconomic inequalities in early adolescence to young adulthood. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Health & Social Behavior is the property of American Sociological Association and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Haas, Steven A. and Nathan Edward Fosse. "Health and the Educational Attainment of Adolescents: Evidence from the NLSY97." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 49,2 (June 2008): 178-192.
7. Hardy, Melissa A.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
The Internal Structure of Self-Reported Health Measures Among Older Workers and Retirees
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 27,4 (December 1986): 346-357.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136949
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Health Factors; Mobility; Occupational Status; Retirees; Retirement; Self-Reporting

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigates the internal structure of the self-reported health measures available in the 1976 wave of the NLS of Older Men. In assessing the relationship between a measure of work-limitations and a set of health factors based on reports of specific symptoms, activity limitations and problematic work conditions, it was found that physical symptoms and activity limitations were especially strong predictors of reported health conditions that limit the respondent's ability to perform on the job. The mix of specific symptom/condition/activity limitations associated with reported work limitations differs not only by occupational category, but by retirement status as well, in that employed workers in lower blue-collar positions were less likely to report work limitations when they said they experienced several symptoms of weakness/fatigue or mobility restrictions. The authors interpret the results as supportive of the notion that the evaluative context invoked by a health question can influence the consistency of the health reports obtained from respondents.
Bibliography Citation
Hardy, Melissa A. and Eliza K. Pavalko. "The Internal Structure of Self-Reported Health Measures Among Older Workers and Retirees." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 27,4 (December 1986): 346-357.
8. Hargrove, Taylor
Intersecting Social Inequalities and Body Mass Index Trajectories from Adolescence to Early Adulthood
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 59,1 (March 2018): 56-73.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0022146517746672
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Racial Differences; Racial Equality/Inequality; Socioeconomic Background; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study combines multiple-hierarchy stratification and life course perspectives to address two research questions critical to understanding U.S. young adult health. First, to what extent are racial-ethnic inequalities in body mass index (BMI) gendered and/or classed? Second, do racial-ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic inequalities in BMI widen or persist between adolescence and early adulthood? Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort and growth curve models, results suggest that among white, black, and Hispanic American men and women ages 13 to 31, racial-ethnic inequality in BMI is greatest among women. Black women experience the highest adolescent BMI and the greatest increases in BMI with age. Furthermore, socioeconomic resources are less protective against weight gain for blacks and Hispanics, with the nature of these relationships varying by gender. Findings present a more nuanced picture of health inequality that renders visible the disproportionate burden of poor health experienced by marginalized groups.
Bibliography Citation
Hargrove, Taylor. "Intersecting Social Inequalities and Body Mass Index Trajectories from Adolescence to Early Adulthood." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 59,1 (March 2018): 56-73.
9. Hayward, Mark D.
Pienta, Amy M.
McLaughlin, Diane K.
Inequality in Men's Mortality: The Socioeconomic Status Gradient and Geographic Context
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 38,4 (December 1997): 313-330.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2955428
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Epidemiology; Health Care; Life Cycle Research; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Mortality; Rural Areas; Rural/Urban Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Lower mortality for older rural Americans, compared to urban residents, runs counter to rural-urban disparities in health care services and residents' socioeconomic resources. This paradox calls into question the ways in which community conditions influence mortality and contextualized the relationship between individuals' socioeconomic status and health. Drawing on 24 years of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men, we observe that rural older men's life expectancy advantages occur even after controlling for residential differences in social class and lifestyle factors. Our results also show that rural advantages in mortality coincide with a more equitable distribution of life chances across the social classes. The association between social class and mortality is strongest among urban men, arising from socioeconomic conditions throughout the life cycle.
Bibliography Citation
Hayward, Mark D., Amy M. Pienta and Diane K. McLaughlin. "Inequality in Men's Mortality: The Socioeconomic Status Gradient and Geographic Context." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 38,4 (December 1997): 313-330.
10. Kane, Jennifer B.
An Integrative Model of Inter- and Intragenerational Preconception Processes Influencing Birthweight in the United States
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 56,2 (June 2015): 246-261.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/56/2/246.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Human Capital; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Marital Status; Modeling, Structural Equation; Mothers and Daughters; Mothers, Health; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Social inequalities in birthweight are an important population health concern as low birthweight is one mechanism through which inequalities are reproduced across generations. Yet, we do not understand what causes these social inequalities. This study draws together theoretic and empiric findings from disparate disciplines—sociology, economics, public health, and behavior genetics—to develop a new integrative intra- and intergenerational model of preconception processes influencing birthweight. This model is empirically tested using structural equation modeling and population-level data containing linked mother-daughter pairs from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) and the Children of the NLSY79 (N = 1,580 mother-daughter pairs). Results reveal that birthweight is shaped by preconception factors dating back to women’s early life environment as well as conditions dating back three generations, via integrative intra- and intergenerational processes. These processes reveal specific pathways through which social inequality can transmit from mothers to children via birthweight.
Bibliography Citation
Kane, Jennifer B. "An Integrative Model of Inter- and Intragenerational Preconception Processes Influencing Birthweight in the United States." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 56,2 (June 2015): 246-261.
11. Kleiner, Sibyl
Schunck, Reinhard
Schomann, Klaus
Different Contexts, Different Effects? Work Time and Mental Health in the United States and Germany
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 56,1 (March 2015): 98-113.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/56/1/98.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP); Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper takes a comparative approach to the topic of work time and health, asking whether weekly work hours matter for mental health. We hypothesize that these relationships differ within the United States and Germany, given the more regulated work time environments within Germany and the greater incentives to work long hours in the United States. We further hypothesize that German women will experience greatest penalties to long hours. We use data from the German Socioeconomic Panel and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine hours effects on mental health score at midlife. The results support our initial hypothesis. In Germany, longer work time is associated with worse mental health, while in the United States, as seen in previous research, the associations are more complex. Our results do not show greater mental health penalties for German women and suggest instead a selection effect into work hours operating by gender.
Bibliography Citation
Kleiner, Sibyl, Reinhard Schunck and Klaus Schomann. "Different Contexts, Different Effects? Work Time and Mental Health in the United States and Germany." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 56,1 (March 2015): 98-113.
12. Leupp, Katrina M.
Depression, Work and Family Roles, and the Gendered Life Course
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 58,4 (December 2017): 422-441.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0022146517737309
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Gender Attitudes/Roles; Gender Differences; Health, Mental; Life Course; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite the importance of employment for shaping mental health over the life course, little is known about how the mental health benefits of employment change as individuals age through their prime employment and child-rearing years. This study examines the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort (N = 8,931), following respondents from their late 20s to mid-50s. Results suggest that among women, the aging of children is especially salient for shaping the mental health consequences of employment. Young children diminish the protective effect of mothers' full- and part-time employment, but the salubrious effects of paid work increase as children get older. The benefit of employment for men’s mental health also changes over time, but it is the aging of men themselves rather than their children that alters the magnitude of full-time employment’s protective effect. Findings suggest the contribution of employment to life course mental health remains tethered to traditional gender roles.
Bibliography Citation
Leupp, Katrina M. "Depression, Work and Family Roles, and the Gendered Life Course." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 58,4 (December 2017): 422-441.
13. Massoglia, Michael
Incarceration as Exposure: The Prison, Infectious Disease, and Other Stress-Related Illnesses
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 49,1 (March 2008): 56-71.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/49/1/56.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Illnesses; Incarceration/Jail; Stress

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the relationship between incarceration and health functioning. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the relationship between incarceration and more than 20 different measures of health are tested. Using multiple analytic procedures, a distinctive pattern of association emerges. Individuals with a history of incarceration appear consistently more likely to be afflicted with infectious disease and other illnesses associated with stress. In contrast, no consistent relationships were observed between incarceration status and ailments unrelated to stress or infectious disease. The results suggest that exposure to infectious disease and stress are important to understanding the lasting impact of incarceration on health. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Health & Social Behavior is the property of American Sociological Association and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Massoglia, Michael. "Incarceration as Exposure: The Prison, Infectious Disease, and Other Stress-Related Illnesses." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 49,1 (March 2008): 56-71.
14. McLeod, Jane D.
Nonnemaker, James M.
Poverty and Child Emotional and Behavioral Problems: Racial/Ethnic Differences in Processes and Effects
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 41,2 (June 2000): 137-161.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2676302
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Ethnic Differences; Marital Status; Mothers, Behavior; Poverty; Psychological Effects; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a sample of four to nine year-old children from the 1992 wave of the Children of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth data set, we evaluated racial and ethnic differences in the effects of current poverty and the persistence of poverty on child emotional and behavioral problems, and in the variables responsible for those effects. We considered three sets of variables in the latter analysis--mother's early characteristics and behaviors; correlated sociodemographic characteristics; and mediators (neighborhood problems, mother's psychological resources, and characteristics of the home environment)--and evaluated their relevance across three racial/ethnic subgroups (blacks, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic whites). Consistent with our expectations, we observed a significantly stronger effect of the persistence of poverty on child problems for whites than for blacks, an effect that is attributable to the relatively strong association between poverty and mother\'s prior history of delinquency and current marital status among whites. The effect of poverty on child problems was substantially explained for blacks by mother's early self-esteem, whereas mediating processes took on greater relevance for Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites. Our results support the conclusion that there are racial/ethnic differences in the selection processes and proximal conditions that are responsible for the diminished psychological well-being of poor children.
Bibliography Citation
McLeod, Jane D. and James M. Nonnemaker. "Poverty and Child Emotional and Behavioral Problems: Racial/Ethnic Differences in Processes and Effects." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 41,2 (June 2000): 137-161.
15. McLeod, Jane D.
Shanahan, Michael J.
Trajectories of Poverty and Children's Mental Health
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 37,3 (September 1996): 207-220.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2137292
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Health; Family History; Health, Mental; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The relationship between family poverty history & children's mental health trajectories was examined through analysis of data from 907 children from the 1986-1990 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth. Analysis revealed that poverty histories in 1986 or prior were related to higher levels of depression in 1986 & that higher levels of depression persisted for a five-year period. Poverty histories subsequent to 1986 were not associated with depression trajectories. The number of years that children were poor between 1986 & 1990 correlated significantly with changes in children's antisocial behavior during those years. Children who were poor in each of these years had higher increases in antisocial behavior than transiently poor or nonpoor children. The accelerating behavioral disadvantages of persistent childhood poverty are discussed. 5 Tables, 2 Appendixes, 51 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1997, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
McLeod, Jane D. and Michael J. Shanahan. "Trajectories of Poverty and Children's Mental Health." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 37,3 (September 1996): 207-220.
16. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Mott, Frank L.
The Intergenerational Costs of Parental Social Stressors: Academic & Social Difficulties in Early Adolescence for Children of Young Mothers
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 38,1 (March 1997): 72-86.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2955362
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Cognitive Development; Family Environment; Family Influences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Adolescent; Occupational Prestige; Parental Influences; Social Environment; Social Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Social stressors embedded in parents' occupational and family roles have been shown to have effects on family interaction and the cognitive and emotional development of young children. Here we consider whether these patterns also hold for children in early adolescence. We study 1158 10-14-year-old children born to the early childbearers among the female respondents of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth cohort. We find that both poor quality of parental employment and low quality of mothers' relationships with their partners have adverse effects on the cognitive stimulation and maternal warmth children receive; living in informal unions is also associated with poorer parent-child interaction. These family interaction patterns in turn both buffer the effects of stressful family conditions and shape academic and behavior outcomes directly. Some work and family conditions interact in their effects: in particular, single mothering has less adverse effects on cognitive stimulation and behavior problems when mothers are employed in occupations providing higher complexity.The effects of current conditions are diminished but seldom eliminated when we control for possible selection effects by utilizing data from earlier waves to control for earlier levels of child problems. These findings suggest that current parental social stressors continue to have consequences for both academic and behavioral outcomes during early adolescence.
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Lori Kowaleski-Jones and Frank L. Mott. "The Intergenerational Costs of Parental Social Stressors: Academic & Social Difficulties in Early Adolescence for Children of Young Mothers." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 38,1 (March 1997): 72-86.
17. Mensch, Barbara S.
Kandel, Denise B.
Do Job Conditions Influence the Use of Drugs?
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 29,2 (June 1988): 169-184.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2137056
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Job Satisfaction; Occupations; Self-Reporting; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The relationship between job conditions and use of four classes of drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana and cocaine, are investigated using data from the NLSY, a nationally representative survey of the labor force experience of young adults aged 19-27 in 1984. Indirect measures of job characteristics, based on Census-based classifications developed by Karasek, et al.,1987 and the DOT (Miller et al., 1980) were supplemented by limited self-reported measures. No clear epidemiological patterns emerge regarding the distribution of drug use either in general or on the job across occupations and industries. Similarly, specific job dimensions, whether assessed from job titles or from the respondents themselves, showed very low correlations with recency/frequency measures of drug use. Individual factors indexing lack of commitment to social institutions, such as having dropped out of school, participation in delinquent activities and not being married are much stronger predictors of drug use than specific job conditions. This study concludes that substance use by workers is not due as much to conditions of the work place as to attributes of the work force.
Bibliography Citation
Mensch, Barbara S. and Denise B. Kandel. "Do Job Conditions Influence the Use of Drugs?" Journal of Health and Social Behavior 29,2 (June 1988): 169-184.
18. Meyer, Madonna Harrington
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Family, Work, and Access to Health Insurance Among Mature Women
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 37,4 (December 1996): 311-325.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2137259
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Benefits, Insurance; Employment, History; Family Characteristics; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Life Cycle Research; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Wives

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use a life course approach to address much ignored variation in access to health insurance. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, we reinterpret the role of both family and employment characteristics in shaping coverage. Mature women are more likely to be insured as wives than as workers, but that safety net is only available to married women. As a result, unmarried women are two to three times as likely to be uninsured or to rely on public programs such as Medicaid. And because they are significantly less likely to be married to a covered worker, Black women are two to three times more likely to be uninsured or to rely on public programs. Given rising instability in employment and marital status across the life course, stable health insurance coverage can only be attained by universal rather than employment-based or family-based schemes. (AUTHOR)
Bibliography Citation
Meyer, Madonna Harrington and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Family, Work, and Access to Health Insurance Among Mature Women." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 37,4 (December 1996): 311-325.
19. Oldham, Greg R.
Gordon, Benjamin I.
Job Complexity and Employee Substance Use: The Moderating Effects of Cognitive Ability
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 40,3 (September 1999): 290-306.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2676353
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Cognitive Ability; Drug Use; Job Requirements; Job Rewards; Job Satisfaction; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the extent to which individuals' general cognitive ability influences relations between the complexity of their jobs and their use of four different substances: cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine. We tested this possibility using 1992 and 1982 data sets from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (Center for Human Resource Research 1993). The 1992 data set included 7,112 individuals and measures of all four substances. The 1982 set included 8,548 individuals and a measure of alcohol use only. Our results showed that for three of the substances (cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana), individuals responded differently to job complexity as a function of their cognitive ability. Specifically, for individuals low in cognitive ability, the more complex their jobs, the greater their use of cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana. On the other hand, for those with high cognitive ability, the more complex their jobs, the lower their use of these substances. Results also showed that cognitive ability had no significant impact on the association between job complexity and cocaine use. In sum, our findings suggest that providing employees with jobs that are compatible with their general cognitive ability may result in lower levels of licit and illicit substance use.
Bibliography Citation
Oldham, Greg R. and Benjamin I. Gordon. "Job Complexity and Employee Substance Use: The Moderating Effects of Cognitive Ability." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 40,3 (September 1999): 290-306.
20. Parcel, Toby L.
Campbell, Lori A.
Zhong, Wenxuan
Children’s Behavior Problems in the United States and Great Britain
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 53,2 (June 2012): 165-182.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/53/2/165
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Britain, British; Cross-national Analysis; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Human Capital; Maternal Employment; NCDS - National Child Development Study (British); Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We analyze the effects of family capital on child behavior problems in the United States and Great Britain by comparing a longitudinal survey sample of 5- to 13-year-old children from the 1994 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 3,864) with a similar sample of children from the 1991 National Child Development Study “British Child” (N = 1,430). Findings suggest that in both societies, male children, those with health problems, and those whose mothers are divorced are at increased risk for behavior problems, while those with stronger home environments are at reduced risk. Family structure effects are more pervasive in Great Britain than in the United States, although some of these findings are a function of our racially diverse U.S. sample. We conclude that parents are important in both societies in promoting child social adjustment, and evidence that the more developed welfare state in Great Britain may substitute for capital at home is weak.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L., Lori A. Campbell and Wenxuan Zhong. "Children’s Behavior Problems in the United States and Great Britain." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 53,2 (June 2012): 165-182.
21. Pavalko, Eliza K.
Gong, Fang
Long, J. Scott
Women's Work, Cohort Change, and Health
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 48, 4 (December 2007): 352-368.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27638721
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Employment; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Modeling, Logit; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Rapid changes in women's labor force participation, access to good jobs, and changing work-family pressures have altered the landscape of work and family life. We use logit negative binomial hurdle models to examine whether these countervailing trends have affected the physical health of women across four birth cohorts. Longitudinal data are used to compare successive cohorts of U.S. women when they are between the ages 44 and 50. While the health of women overall did not change across cohorts, we find an increase in health problems among employed women, explained by increases in the ability of women with physical limitations to become and remain employed. Health problems among housewives decline across cohorts, resulting in better health among housewives than among employed women in the most recent cohort. These findings provide further evidence of the importance of selection processes in understanding health effects of roles, and they highlight the need for greater attention to the health effects of unpaid work.
Bibliography Citation
Pavalko, Eliza K., Fang Gong and J. Scott Long. "Women's Work, Cohort Change, and Health." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 48, 4 (December 2007): 352-368.
22. Pavalko, Eliza K.
Mossakowski, Krysia N.
Hamilton, Vanessa J.
Does Perceived Discrimination Affect Health? Longitudinal Relationships between Work Discrimination and Women's Physical and Emotional Health
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 44,1 (March 2003): 18-33.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1519813
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Discrimination, Employer; Discrimination, Job; Discrimination, Sex; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses longitudinal data to examine the causal relationships between perceived work discrimination and women's physical and emotional health. Using data on 1,778 employed women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, we investigate the structural and individual characteristics that predict later perceptions of discrimination and the effects of those perceptions on subsequent health. We find that perceptions of discrimination are influenced by job attitudes, prior experiences of discrimination, and work contexts, but prior health is not related to later perceptions. However, perceptions of discrimination do impact subsequent health, and these effects remain significant after controlling for prior emotional health, physical health limitations, discrimination, and job characteristics. Overall, the results provide even stronger support for the health impact of workplace discrimination and suggest a need for further longitudinal analyses of causes and consequences of perceived discrimination.
Bibliography Citation
Pavalko, Eliza K., Krysia N. Mossakowski and Vanessa J. Hamilton. "Does Perceived Discrimination Affect Health? Longitudinal Relationships between Work Discrimination and Women's Physical and Emotional Health." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 44,1 (March 2003): 18-33.
23. Pavalko, Eliza K.
Woodbury, Shari
Social Roles as Process: Caregiving Careers and Women's Health
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 41,1 (March 2000): 91-105.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2676362
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Employment; Exits; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Psychological Effects; Social Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Is involvement in multiple roles beneficial for women's health or do the often noted health benefits of multiple roles reflect an ongoing process of role management? We address this question by looking at two roles, caregiving and employment, and by investigating changes in women's health as they move into and out of both roles. We examine changes in physical health limitations and psychological distress over a two-year period with data from a nationally representative sample of 2,929 late-midlife women. Looking first at health changes associated with caregiving, we find that psychological distress increases as women move into and continue caring for an ill or disabled person in their household. Caregiving has a weaker effect on physical health, but increases in physical limitations prompt exits from caregiving. Increases in physical limitations also appear to be greater for non-employed women, but some or all of this difference reflects selection out of the labor force for women having difficulty combining both roles. Our findings provide further evidence that care work has implications for women's health, while also suggesting a need for further attention to the ways that women actively manage problematic role combinations.
Bibliography Citation
Pavalko, Eliza K. and Shari Woodbury. "Social Roles as Process: Caregiving Careers and Women's Health." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 41,1 (March 2000): 91-105.
24. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Is it Really Worse to Have Public Health Insurance Than to Have No Insurance at All? Health Insurance and Adult Health in the United States
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 45,4 (December 2004): 376-392.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/45/4/376.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Health Care; Health Reform; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Medicaid/Medicare; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using prospective cohort data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study examines the extent to which health insurance coverage and the source of that coverage affect adult health. While previous research has shown that privately insure nonelderly individuals enjoy better health outcomes than their uninsured counterparts, the same relationship does not hold for those publicly insured through programs such as Medicaid. Because it is unclear whether this finding reflects a true causal relationship or is in fact due to selection bias by using fixed effects models with sibling clusters to corroborate--or contradict--the results of a conventional OLS regression. By controlling for unobserved factors shared by siblings, such as parental genetic influences, sibling models estimate health insurance effects that are less affected by selection bias. Findings suggest that, among the US birth cohorts of 1957 to 1961, the negative relationship between public health insurance and health is not causal, but rather due to prior health and socioeconomic status. Conversely, the lack of health insurance coverage has a strong cumulative negative impact on adult health.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie. "Is it Really Worse to Have Public Health Insurance Than to Have No Insurance at All? Health Insurance and Adult Health in the United States." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 45,4 (December 2004): 376-392.
25. Reyes, Adriana M.
Hardy, Melissa A.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Race Differences in Linking Family Formation Transitions to Women's Mortality
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 59,2 (June 2018): 231-247.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0022146518757014
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Family Formation; First Birth; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Mortality; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We examine how the timing and sequencing of first marriage and childbirth are related to mortality for a cohort of 4,988 white and black women born between 1922 and 1937 from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women. We use Cox proportional hazard models to estimate race differences in the association between family formation transitions and mortality. Although we find no relationships between marital histories and longevity, we do find that having children, the timing of first birth, and the sequencing of childbirth and marriage are associated with mortality. White women who had children lived longer than those who had none, but the opposite was found for black women. The effects of birth timing also differed by race; delaying first birth to older ages was protective for white women but not black women. These results underscore the importance of social context in the study of life course transitions.
Bibliography Citation
Reyes, Adriana M., Melissa A. Hardy and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Race Differences in Linking Family Formation Transitions to Women's Mortality." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 59,2 (June 2018): 231-247.
26. Rogers, Stacy J.
Parcel, Toby L.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
The Effects of Maternal Working Conditions and Mastery on Child Behavior Problems: Studying the Intergenerational Transmission of Social Control
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 32,2 (June 1991): 145-164.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2137149
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Child Development; Children; Children, Behavioral Development; Control; General Assessment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Maternal Employment; Mothers; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper assesses the impact of maternal sense of mastery and maternal working conditions on maternal perceptions of children's behavior problems as a means to study the transmission of social control across generations. Data from a sample of 521 employed mothers and their four-to-six-year-old children from the NLSY in 1986 are utilized. Regarding working conditions, the authors consider mother's hourly wage, work hours, and job content including involvement with things (vs. people), the requisite level of physical activity, and occupational complexity. Also considered are maternal and child background and current family characteristics, including marital status, family size, and home environment. Maternal mastery was related to fewer reported behavior problems among children. Lower involvement with people and higher involvement with things, as well as low physical activity, were related significantly to higher levels of perceived problems. In addition, recent changes in maternal marital status, including maternal marriage or remarriage, increased reports of problems; stronger home environments had the opposite effect. The authors interpret these findings as suggesting how maternal experiences of control in the workplace and personal resources of control can influence the internalization of control in children.
Bibliography Citation
Rogers, Stacy J., Toby L. Parcel and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "The Effects of Maternal Working Conditions and Mastery on Child Behavior Problems: Studying the Intergenerational Transmission of Social Control." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 32,2 (June 1991): 145-164.
27. Rushing, Beth
Ritter, Christian
Burton, Russell P. D.
Race Differences in the Effects of Multiple Roles on Health: Longitudinal Evidence from a National Sample of Older Men
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 33,2 (June 1992): 126-139.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2137251
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Employment; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marriage; Mortality; Racial Differences; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines race differences in the effects of social roles on physical health. Using data from the older men cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience, we examine the impact of employment, marriage, and being a supporter on health limitations and mortality. Employment has the most consistent health-protective effect, and the benefits of employment are more pronounced for Blacks than for Whites. Marriage affects health in conjunction with employment. These findings lend further support to the growing literature on the effects of roles on health. The results further illustrate the importance of ascribed statuses as structural determinants of the relationship between roles and health, highlighting the very real differences in the meanings and expectations of social roles for Blacks and Whites.
Bibliography Citation
Rushing, Beth, Christian Ritter and Russell P. D. Burton. "Race Differences in the Effects of Multiple Roles on Health: Longitudinal Evidence from a National Sample of Older Men." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 33,2 (June 1992): 126-139.
28. Schnittker, Jason
John, Andrea
Enduring Stigma: The Long-Term Effects of Incarceration on Health
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 48,2 (June 2007): 115-130.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/48/2/115.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Incarceration/Jail; Marital Instability; Racial Differences; Stress; Wage Growth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although incarceration rates have risen sharply since the 1970s, medical sociology has largely neglected the health effects of imprisonment. Incarceration might have powerful effects on health, especially if it instills stigma, and it could provide sociologists with another mechanism for understanding health disparities. This study identifies some of incarceration's direct and indirect effects and rigorously tests them using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. It finds that incarceration has powerful effects on health, but only after release. A history of incarceration strongly increases the likelihood of severe health limitations. Furthermore, any contact with prison is generally more important than the amount of contact, a finding consistent with a stigma-based interpretation. Although this relationship is partly attributable to diminished wage growth and marital instability, the bulk of the effect remains even under the most stringent of specifications, including controls for intelligence and the use of fixed effects, suggesting a far-reaching process with a proliferation of risk factors. The study also finds that incarceration contributes only modestly to racial disparities, that there are few synergistic interactions between incarceration and other features of inequality, including schooling, and that the evidence for a causal effect is much weaker among persistent recidivists and those serving exceptionally long sentences. These study findings are inconsistent with recent speculation; nevertheless, incarceration is an important addition to sociology's research agenda. Exploring incarceration could lead to, among other things, a fruitful synergy among studies on fundamental causes, stigma, and stress. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Health & Social Behavior is the property of American Sociological Association and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Schnittker, Jason and Andrea John. "Enduring Stigma: The Long-Term Effects of Incarceration on Health." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 48,2 (June 2007): 115-130.
29. Spence, Naomi J.
Adkins, Daniel E.
Dupre, Matthew E.
Racial Differences in Depression Trajectories among Older Women: Socioeconomic, Family, and Health Influences
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 52,4 (December 2011): 444-459.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/52/4/444.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite recent increases in life course research on mental illness, important questions remain about the social patterning of, and explanations for, depression trajectories among women in later life. The authors investigate competing theoretical frameworks for the age patterning of depressive symptoms and the physical health, socioeconomic, and family mechanisms differentiating black and white women. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, the authors use linear mixed (growth curve) models to estimate trajectories of distress for women aged 52 to 81 years (N = 3,182). The results demonstrate that: (1) there are persistently higher levels of depressive symptoms among black women relative to white women throughout later life; (2) physical health and socioeconomic status account for much of the racial gap in depressive symptoms; and (3) marital status moderates race differences in distress. The findings highlight the importance of physical health, family, and socioeconomic status in racial disparities in mental health.
Bibliography Citation
Spence, Naomi J., Daniel E. Adkins and Matthew E. Dupre. "Racial Differences in Depression Trajectories among Older Women: Socioeconomic, Family, and Health Influences." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 52,4 (December 2011): 444-459.
30. Su, Jessica Houston
Unintended Birth and Children's Long-term Mental Health
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 58,3 (September 2017): 357-370.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0022146517717037
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Birth Preferences/Birth Expectations; Child Health; Depression (see also CESD); Health, Mental; Parental Influences; Wantedness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research has examined the proximate effects of unintended birth on infants and young children, but we know relatively little about the longer-term effects. Given that unintended birth is associated with several childhood risk factors, it might set the stage for poor mental health in adulthood. Drawing on rich intergenerational survey data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 (N = 3,742), this study used a variety of statistical techniques to examine whether maternal pregnancy intentions are associated with children's depressive symptoms during early adulthood. Results from ordinary least squares regression suggest that children resulting from unintended pregnancies experienced more depressive symptoms in their 20s than children resulting from intended pregnancies, controlling for a host of characteristics. Results from propensity-weighted and sibling fixed-effects models suggest that there is little to no causal relationship, however. Much of the initial association between maternal fertility intentions and children's depressive symptoms is attributed to the mother's sociodemographic characteristics.
Bibliography Citation
Su, Jessica Houston. "Unintended Birth and Children's Long-term Mental Health." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 58,3 (September 2017): 357-370.
31. Vuolo, Mike
Kadowaki, Joy
Kelly, Brian
A Multilevel Test of Constrained Choices Theory: The Case of Tobacco Clean Air Restrictions
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 57,3 (September 2016): 351-372.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/57/3/351.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Legislation; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

According to Bird and Rieker's sociology of constrained choices, decisions and priorities concerning health are shaped by the contexts--including policy, community, and work/family--in which they are formulated. While each level received attention in the original and subsequent research, we contend their constrained choices theory provides a powerful multilevel framework for modeling health outcomes. We apply this framework to tobacco clean air restrictions, combining a comprehensive database of tobacco policies with the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 from ages 19 to 31. Using multilevel panel models, we find that clean air policies lower the odds of past 30 day smoking and dependence while controlling for other policy-, city-, and individual-level constraints. We also find unique between- and within-person effects, as well as gender effects, for the constraint levied by smoking bans. We argue for the theory's broad applicability beyond commonly cited findings regarding gender and biological influences.
Bibliography Citation
Vuolo, Mike, Joy Kadowaki and Brian Kelly. "A Multilevel Test of Constrained Choices Theory: The Case of Tobacco Clean Air Restrictions." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 57,3 (September 2016): 351-372.
32. Waldron, Ingrid
Weiss, Christopher C.
Hughes, Mary Elizabeth
Interacting Effects of Multiple Roles on Women's Health
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 39,3 (September 1998): 216-236.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2676314
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing, Adolescent; Employment; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Status; Marriage; Motherhood; Women's Roles; Women's Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Our study tests several hypotheses concerning the effects of employment, marriage, and motherhood on women 's general physical health. These hypotheses predict how the health effect of each role varies, depending on specific role characteristics and the other roles a woman holds. Our analyses utilize longitudinal panel data for 3,331 women from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women follow-up intervals: 1978-83 and 1983-88. The Role Substitution Hypothesis proposes that employment and marriage provide similar resources (e.g., income and social support), and, consequently, employment and marriage can substitute for each other in their beneficial effects on health. As predicted, we found that employment had beneficial effects on health for unmarried women, but little or no effect for married women. Similarly, marriage had beneficial effects on health only for women who were not employed. The Role Combination Strain Hypothesis proposes that employed mothers experience role strai n, resulting in harmful effects on health. However, we found very little evidence that the combination of employment and motherhood resulted in harmful health effects. Contrary to the predictions of the Quantitative Demands Role Strain Hypothesis, it appears that neither longer hours of employment nor having more children resulted in harmful effects on health. As predicted by the Age Related Parental Role Strain Hypothesis, younger age at first birth, particularly a teenage birth, appeared to result in more harmful health effects.
Bibliography Citation
Waldron, Ingrid, Christopher C. Weiss and Mary Elizabeth Hughes. "Interacting Effects of Multiple Roles on Women's Health." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 39,3 (September 1998): 216-236.
33. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Gee, Gilbert C.
Geronimus, Arline T.
Ethnic Differences in Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms: Disadvantage in Family Background, High School Experiences, and Adult Characteristics
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,1 (March 2009): 82-98.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/50/1/82.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Health, Mental; Life Course; Modeling, Random Effects; Racial Differences; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although research investigating ethnic differences in mental health has increased in recent years, we know relatively little about how mental health trajectories vary across ethnic groups. Do these differences occur at certain ages but not others? We investigate ethnic variation in trajectories of depressive symptoms, and we examine the extent to which disadvantages in family background, high school experiences, and adult characteristics explain these differences. Employing random-coefficient modeling using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we find that blacks and Hispanics experience higher symptom levels in early adulthood in comparison to whites, but equivalent levels by middle age. Ethnic differences remained in early adulthood after including all covariates, but those differences were eliminated by middle age for Hispanics after controlling for demographics only, and for blacks after accounting for the age-varying relationship between income and depressive symptoms. These results highlight the importance of integrating a life course perspective when investigating ethnic variations in mental health. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Health & Social Behavior is the property of American Sociological Association and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Gilbert C. Gee and Arline T. Geronimus. "Ethnic Differences in Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms: Disadvantage in Family Background, High School Experiences, and Adult Characteristics." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,1 (March 2009): 82-98.
34. Warner, David F.
Hayward, Mark D.
Early-Life Origins of the Race Gap in Men's Mortality
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 47,3 (September 2006): 209-226.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/47/3/209.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Family Structure; Life Course; Mortality; Occupational Status; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Background; Socioeconomic Factors; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a life course framework, we examine the early life origins of the race gap in men's all-cause mortality. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men (1966–1990), we evaluate major social pathways by which early life conditions differentiate the mortality experiences of blacks and whites. Our findings indicate that early life socioeconomic conditions, particularly parental occupation and family structure, explain part of the race gap in mortality. Black men's higher rates of death are associated with lower socioeconomic standing in early life and living in homes lacking both biological parents. However, these effects operate indirectly through adult socioeconomic achievement processes, as education, family income, wealth, and occupational complexity statistically account for the race gap in men's mortality. Our findings suggest that policy interventions to eliminate race disparities in mortality and health should address both childhood and adult socioeconomic conditions. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Warner, David F. and Mark D. Hayward. "Early-Life Origins of the Race Gap in Men's Mortality." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 47,3 (September 2006): 209-226.
35. Wilkinson, Lindsay R.
Shippee, Tetyana P.
Ferraro, Kenneth
Does Occupational Mobility Influence Health among Working Women? Comparing Objective and Subjective Measures of Work Trajectories
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 53,4 (December 2012): 432-447.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/53/4/432.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Duncan Index; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mobility, Occupational; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Occupational mobility is highly valued in American society, but is it consequential to women’s health? Previous studies have yielded inconsistent results, but most measured occupational mobility by identifying transitions across occupational categories. Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, this study (1) compares objective and subjective measures of work trajectories and (2) examines the contributions of each to self-rated health. With 36 years of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (1967-2003), growth curve models are used to estimate the effects of middle-aged work trajectories on health among 2,503 U.S. women. Work trajectories as measured by the Duncan Socioeconomic Index predict health, but not after adjustment for perceived work trajectories and status characteristics. The findings reveal that subjective measures of occupational mobility provide important information for assessing health consequences of work transitions and that downward occupational mobility in middle age is deleterious to women’s health in later life.
Bibliography Citation
Wilkinson, Lindsay R., Tetyana P. Shippee and Kenneth Ferraro. "Does Occupational Mobility Influence Health among Working Women? Comparing Objective and Subjective Measures of Work Trajectories." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 53,4 (December 2012): 432-447.
36. Williams, Kristi
Sassler, Sharon
Addo, Fenaba
Frech, Adrianne
First-birth Timing, Marital History, and Women's Health at Midlife
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 56,4 (December 2015): 514-533.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/56/4/514.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; First Birth; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital History/Transitions; Propensity Scores; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite evidence that first-birth timing influences women's health, the role of marital status in shaping this association has received scant attention. Using multivariate propensity score matching, we analyze data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to estimate the effect of having a first birth in adolescence (prior to age 20), young adulthood (ages 20-24), or later ages (ages 25-35) on women's midlife self-assessed health. Findings suggest that adolescent childbearing is associated with worse midlife health compared to later births for black women but not for white women. Yet, we find no evidence of health advantages of delaying first births from adolescence to young adulthood for either group. Births in young adulthood are linked to worse health than later births among both black and white women. Our results also indicate that marriage following a nonmarital adolescent or young adult first birth is associated with modestly worse self-assessed health compared to remaining unmarried.
Bibliography Citation
Williams, Kristi, Sharon Sassler, Fenaba Addo and Adrianne Frech. "First-birth Timing, Marital History, and Women's Health at Midlife." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 56,4 (December 2015): 514-533.
37. Williams, Kristi
Sassler, Sharon
Frech, Adrianne
Addo, Fenaba
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Mothers’ Union Histories and the Mental and Physical Health of Adolescents Born to Unmarried Mothers
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 54,3 (September 2013): 278-295.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/54/3/278.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent health; Age at Birth; CESD (Depression Scale); Cohabitation; Depression (see also CESD); Fertility; Health Factors; Marital History/Transitions; Marital Status; Parents, Single

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As nonmarital childbearing becomes a dominant pathway to family formation, understanding its long-term consequences for children’s well-being is increasingly important. Analysis of linked mother-child data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth indicates a negative association of having been born to a never-married mother with adolescent self-assessed health but not with depressive symptoms. We also consider the role of mothers’ subsequent union histories in shaping the adolescent health outcomes of youth born to unmarried mothers. With two exceptions, unmarried mothers’ subsequent unions appear to have little consequence for the health of their offspring during adolescence. Adolescents whose mothers subsequently married and remained with their biological fathers reported better health, yet adolescents whose mothers continuously cohabited with their biological fathers without subsequent marriage reported worse adolescent mental health compared with adolescents whose mothers remained continually unpartnered.
Bibliography Citation
Williams, Kristi, Sharon Sassler, Adrianne Frech, Fenaba Addo and Elizabeth C. Cooksey. "Mothers’ Union Histories and the Mental and Physical Health of Adolescents Born to Unmarried Mothers." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 54,3 (September 2013): 278-295.
38. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Age at First Birth and Alcohol Use
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,4 (December 2009): 395-409.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/50/4/395.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Alcohol Use; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Multilevel; Parenthood; Stress; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Two theoretical perspectives, role incompatibility and stress proliferation, suggest that age at first birth is associated with alcohol use, but each theory offers distinct predictions about the effect of relatively early parenthood on alcohol use. This study examines the applicability of these perspectives using data spanning over twenty years (1982 to 2002) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Results from fixed effects and multilevel models indicate that people decrease binge drinking surrounding the transition into parenthood regardless of age at first birth. However, relatively young parents increase binge drinking as they age from early to later adulthood, while others decrease drinking. Findings support an integration of the two theoretical perspectives. Role incompatibility best describes the initial effect of parenthood, but predictions drawn from stress proliferation more accurately describe the association between early parenthood and binge drinking into later adulthood. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. "Age at First Birth and Alcohol Use." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,4 (December 2009): 395-409.
39. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Hardy, Melissa A.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Multigenerational Attainments, Race, and Mortality Risk among Silent Generation Women
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 59,3 (September 2018): 335-351.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0022146518784596
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mortality; Occupations; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study extends health disparities research by examining racial differences in the relationships between multigenerational attainments and mortality risk among "Silent Generation" women. An emerging literature suggests that the socioeconomic attainments of adjacent generations, one's parents and adult children, provide an array of life-extending resources in old age. Prior research, however, has demonstrated neither how multigenerational resources are implicated in women's longevity nor how racial disparities faced by Silent Generation women may differentially structure the relationships between socioeconomic attainments and mortality. With data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, the analysis provided evidence of a three-generation model in which parent occupation, family wealth, and adult child education were independently associated with women's mortality. Although we found evidence of racial differences in the associations between parental, personal, and spousal education and mortality risk, the education of adult children was a robust predictor of survival for black and white women.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Melissa A. Hardy and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Multigenerational Attainments, Race, and Mortality Risk among Silent Generation Women." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 59,3 (September 2018): 335-351.