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Source: Journal of Research on Adolescence
Resulting in 13 citations.
1. Brauer, Jonathan R.
Cultivating Conformists or Raising Rebels? Connecting Parental Control and Autonomy Support to Adolescent Delinquency
Journal of Research on Adolescence 27,2 (June 2017): 452-470.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jora.12283/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Self-Control/Self-Regulation

This study investigates short-term and long-term associations between parenting in early adolescence and delinquency throughout adolescence using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys. Multilevel longitudinal Poisson regressions show that behavioral control, psychological control, and decision-making autonomy in early adolescence (ages 10-11) are associated with delinquency trajectories throughout adolescence (ages 10-17). Path analyses reveal support for three mediation hypotheses. Parental monitoring (behavioral control) is negatively associated with delinquency in the short term and operates partly through changes in self-control. Parental pressure (psychological control) shows immediate and long-lasting associations with delinquency through changes in self-control and delinquent peer pressures. Decision-making autonomy is negatively associated with delinquency in the long term, yet may exacerbate delinquency in early adolescence by increasing exposure to delinquent peers.
Bibliography Citation
Brauer, Jonathan R. "Cultivating Conformists or Raising Rebels? Connecting Parental Control and Autonomy Support to Adolescent Delinquency." Journal of Research on Adolescence 27,2 (June 2017): 452-470.
2. Crockett, Lisa J.
Raffaelli, Marcela
Shen, Yuh-Ling
Linking Self-Regulation and Risk Proneness to Risky Sexual Behavior: Pathways through Peer Pressure and Early Substance Use
Journal of Research on Adolescence 16,4 (December 2006): 503-525.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-7795.2006.00505.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Gender Differences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Risk-Taking; Self-Regulation/Self-Control; Sexual Behavior; Substance Use

The linkages between self-regulation in childhood, risk proneness in early adolescence, and risky sexual behavior in mid-adolescence were examined in a cohort of children ( N=518) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The possible mediating role of two early adolescent variables (substance use and negative peer pressure) was also examined. Self-regulation was assessed by maternal report at ages 8–9, and risk proneness, comprising aspects of sensation seeking and decision making, was assessed by adolescent self-report at ages 12–13. Structural equation models predicting risky sexual behavior at ages 16–17 indicated that self-regulation operated partly through early adolescent substance use, whereas risk proneness operated through early adolescent substance use and negative peer pressure. The overall model did not differ significantly for boys and girls, although there were gender differences in the strength of particular paths. These long-term longitudinal results support the importance of early self-regulation and risk proneness in setting the stage for adolescent sexual risk taking and implicate substance use and negative peer pressure as processes through which risk proneness and poor self-regulation lead to risky sexual behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Crockett, Lisa J., Marcela Raffaelli and Yuh-Ling Shen. "Linking Self-Regulation and Risk Proneness to Risky Sexual Behavior: Pathways through Peer Pressure and Early Substance Use." Journal of Research on Adolescence 16,4 (December 2006): 503-525.
3. Gillespie, Brian Joseph
Residential Mobility and Change and Continuity in Parenting Processes
Journal of Research on Adolescence 25,2 (June 2015): 279-294.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jora.12114/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Mobility, Residential; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles

This research investigates the association between residential mobility and changes in parenting style and parental monitoring using panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 on adolescents aged 14-18 (N = 2,631). Logistic and multinomial logistic regression results indicate that moving is significantly associated with an increase in parental monitoring for fathers and sons, but not mothers and daughters. Residential mobility is also associated with changes in parenting style for mothers and fathers. However, specific changes in parenting styles for residentially mobile mothers and fathers depend upon the parenting style exhibited before the move. These changes also depend upon the gender composition of the parent-child relationship.
Bibliography Citation
Gillespie, Brian Joseph. "Residential Mobility and Change and Continuity in Parenting Processes." Journal of Research on Adolescence 25,2 (June 2015): 279-294.
4. Gortmaker, Steven L.
Perrin, James M.
Weitzman, Michael
Homer, Charles J.
An Unexpected Success Story: Transition to Adulthood in Youth with Chronic Physical Health Conditions. Special Issue: Late Adolescence and the Transition to Adulthood
Journal of Research on Adolescence 3,3 (1993): 317-336
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Educational Attainment; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Self-Esteem; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Gortmaker, Steven L., James M. Perrin, Michael Weitzman and Charles J. Homer. "An Unexpected Success Story: Transition to Adulthood in Youth with Chronic Physical Health Conditions. Special Issue: Late Adolescence and the Transition to Adulthood." Journal of Research on Adolescence 3,3 (1993): 317-336.
5. Grossman, Michael
Chaloupka, Frank J.
Saffer, Henry
Laixuthai, Adit
Effects of Alcohol Price Policy on Youth: A Summary of Economic Research
Journal of Research on Adolescence 4,2 (1994): 347-364
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; College Dropouts; College Graduates; Cost-Benefit Studies; Data Linkage (also see Record Linkage); Economics, Regional; Mortality; Taxes

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Grossman, Michael, Frank J. Chaloupka, Henry Saffer and Adit Laixuthai. "Effects of Alcohol Price Policy on Youth: A Summary of Economic Research." Journal of Research on Adolescence 4,2 (1994): 347-364.
6. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Garrett, Sarah Bracey
Ling, Thomson J.
Cleveland, Kevin
The Continued Importance of Quality Parent–Adolescent Relationships During Late Adolescence
Journal of Research on Adolescence 18,1 (March 2008): 187-200.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-7795.2008.00556.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Attrition; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Health Factors; Health, Mental; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Well-Being

The quality of adolescents' relationships with residential parents has been found to predict many different health and behavioral youth outcomes; strong associations have also been found between these outcomes and family processes, and between relationship quality and family processes. Data from Rounds 1–5 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 were used to examine hypotheses about the influence of the parent–adolescent relationship on subsequent adolescent mental well-being and delinquency, as mediated by family processes. Using structural equation modeling, we found that the influence of a positive residential parent–adolescent relationship on better mental well-being and fewer delinquency was entirely mediated by family routines, parental monitoring, and parental supportiveness, net of sociodemographic controls. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Research on Adolescence (Blackwell Publishing Limited) is the property of Blackwell Publishing Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Kristin Anderson Moore, Sarah Bracey Garrett, Thomson J. Ling and Kevin Cleveland. "The Continued Importance of Quality Parent–Adolescent Relationships During Late Adolescence." Journal of Research on Adolescence 18,1 (March 2008): 187-200.
7. Harper, Cynthia Channing
McLanahan, Sara S.
Father Absence and Youth Incarceration
Journal of Research on Adolescence 14,3 (September 2004): 369-398.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-7795.2004.00079.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Event History; Fathers, Absence; Incarceration/Jail; Income Level; Mothers, Adolescent; Poverty; Racial Differences; Stepfamilies

This study measured the likelihood of youth incarceration among adolescent males from father-absent households, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N=34,031 person-years). At baseline, the adolescents ranged from 14 to 17 years, and the incarceration outcome measure spanned ages 15 to 30 years. This study tested whether risk factors concentrated in father-absent households explained the apparent effects of father absence. Results from longitudinal event-history analysis showed that although a sizable portion of the risk that appeared to be due to father absence could actually be attributed to other factors, such as teen motherhood, low parent education, racial inequalities, and poverty, adolescents in father-absent households still faced elevated incarceration risks. The adolescents who faced the highest incarceration risks, however, were those in stepparent families, including father-stepmother families. Coresidential grandparents may help attenuate this risk, although remarriage and residential instability increased it. Social policies to support children should broaden beyond an emphasis on marriage to address the risks faced by adolescents living in stepfamilies as well. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Harper, Cynthia Channing and Sara S. McLanahan. "Father Absence and Youth Incarceration." Journal of Research on Adolescence 14,3 (September 2004): 369-398.
8. Ketterlinus, Robert D.
Lamb, Michael E.
Henderson, Sandra H.
The Effects of Maternal Age-at-Birth on Children's Cognitive Development
Journal of Research on Adolescence 1,2 (1991): 173-188
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Children; Children, Academic Development; Hispanics; Intelligence; Mothers; Mothers, Race; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Ketterlinus, Robert D., Michael E. Lamb and Sandra H. Henderson. "The Effects of Maternal Age-at-Birth on Children's Cognitive Development." Journal of Research on Adolescence 1,2 (1991): 173-188.
9. Moilanen, Kristin L.
Crockett, Lisa J.
Raffaelli, Marcela
Jones, Bobby L.
Trajectories of Sexual Risk From Middle Adolescence to Early Adulthood
Journal of Research on Adolescence 20,1 (March 2010): 114-139.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-7795.2009.00628.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Sexual Activity; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Cohabitation; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parents, Non-Custodial; Parents, Single; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Risk-Taking; Self-Regulation/Self-Control; Sexual Behavior

Developmental trajectories of risky sexual behavior were identified in a multiethnic sample of 1,121 youth drawn from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data set (NLSY79). Group-based trajectory modeling of a composite index of sexual risk taking revealed four sexual risk groups from ages 16 to 22: low risk, decreasing risk, increasing risk, and high risk. The Low Risk group exhibited low levels of risk across the study period. The Decreasing Risk group had high levels of sexual risk in adolescence that declined in early adulthood. The Increasing Risk and High Risk groups showed distinct risk patterns during adolescence but converged in early adulthood. When compared with adolescents in the low-risk group, individuals in the other groups were more likely to be male, had mothers who had an early birth, were less likely to live with both biological parents in early adolescence, had higher risk proneness, and reported more negative peer pressure. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Research on Adolescence (Blackwell Publishing Limited) is the property of Blackwell Publishing Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Moilanen, Kristin L., Lisa J. Crockett, Marcela Raffaelli and Bobby L. Jones. "Trajectories of Sexual Risk From Middle Adolescence to Early Adulthood." Journal of Research on Adolescence 20,1 (March 2010): 114-139.
10. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Myers, David E.
Morrison, Donna Ruane
Edmonston, B.
Age at First Childbirth and Later Poverty
Journal of Research on Adolescence 3,4 (1993): 393-422
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Birth; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Childbearing, Adolescent; Earnings; Ethnic Groups; Family Background; Family Income; Family Size; Fertility; First Birth; Hispanics; Poverty; Pregnancy, Adolescent

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, David E. Myers, Donna Ruane Morrison and B. Edmonston. "Age at First Childbirth and Later Poverty." Journal of Research on Adolescence 3,4 (1993): 393-422.
11. Parra, Gilbert R.
Jobe-Shields, Lisa
Kitzmann, Katherine M.
Luebbe, Aaron M.
Olsen, James P.
Davis, Genevieve L.
Investigation of Change in Adolescent Perceptions of Mothers' and Fathers' Contributions to Interparental Discord From 7th to 9th Grades
Journal of Research on Adolescence 21,2 (June 2011): 408-419.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-7795.2010.00678.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Depression (see also CESD); Fathers and Children; Fathers and Sons; Gender Differences; Marital Conflict; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Mothers and Daughters; Mothers, Behavior; Parents, Behavior

Full article available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-7795.2010.00678.x/full

The purpose of the present study was to examine whether adolescent perceptions of mothers' and fathers' contributions to interparental discord changed from early to middle adolescence and if the changes were related to adolescent negative mood. Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Adolescents who were in 7th grade at the Wave 1 assessment and lived with both biological parents during Waves 1-4 were included in this research ( n=812; 55% boys; 69% White). Findings indicated that adolescents' perceptions of their mothers' and their fathers' contributions to interparental discord increased at similar rates from early to middle adolescence. The largest increases in adolescent perceptions of mothers' and fathers' contributions to interparental discord from 7th to 9th grades were associated with the largest increases in adolescent negative mood from 7th to 10th grades. Girls' perceptions of their fathers' contributions to interparental relationship problems increased at a steeper rate compared with boys. Findings are discussed in the context of the sensitization hypothesis. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Research on Adolescence (Blackwell Publishing Limited) is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Parra, Gilbert R., Lisa Jobe-Shields, Katherine M. Kitzmann, Aaron M. Luebbe, James P. Olsen and Genevieve L. Davis. "Investigation of Change in Adolescent Perceptions of Mothers' and Fathers' Contributions to Interparental Discord From 7th to 9th Grades." Journal of Research on Adolescence 21,2 (June 2011): 408-419.
12. Romich, Jennifer L.
Lundberg, Shelly
Tsang, Kwok Ping
Independence Giving or Autonomy Taking? Childhood Predictors of Decision-Sharing Patterns Between Young Adolescents and Parents
Journal of Research on Adolescence 19,4 (December 2009): 587-600.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-7795.2009.00612.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

This article reports on a study of whether young adolescents make decisions autonomously, share decisions with their parents, or have decisions made for them by parents. Using a sample of 2,632 12- and 13-year-olds from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Child Survey we examine how childhood behavior and competence influence decision patterns in young adolescence. Individual models are used to test whether traits predict decision patterns, and sibling fixed-effects models allow us to estim\ate effects of child characteristics net of stable family contributions. In both individual and sibling fixed-effects models, children with higher verbal ability share more decision making with parents. Children with greater mathematical aptitude and children who are impulsive are more likely to make decisions without consulting parents. The impulsivity effect is stronger in families with fewer resources. These results suggest that children directly and indirectly influence household decision-sharing patterns.
Bibliography Citation
Romich, Jennifer L., Shelly Lundberg and Kwok Ping Tsang. "Independence Giving or Autonomy Taking? Childhood Predictors of Decision-Sharing Patterns Between Young Adolescents and Parents." Journal of Research on Adolescence 19,4 (December 2009): 587-600.
13. Upchurch, Dawn M.
Early Schooling and Childbearing Experiences: Implications for Postsecondary School Attendance
Journal of Research on Adolescence 3,4 (1993): 423-443
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Dropouts; Education; Family Background; Fertility; Household Composition; Mothers, Adolescent; School Completion; School Dropouts; Schooling; Schooling, Post-secondary

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Upchurch, Dawn M. "Early Schooling and Childbearing Experiences: Implications for Postsecondary School Attendance." Journal of Research on Adolescence 3,4 (1993): 423-443.