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Source: Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare
Resulting in 17 citations.
1. Caputo, Richard K.
Discrimination and Human Capital: A Challenge to Economic Theory & Social Justice
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 29,2 (June 2002): 105-124.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/29-2.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Affirmative Action; Discrimination; Discrimination, Age; Discrimination, Employer; Discrimination, Job; Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Discrimination, Sex; Gender Differences; Human Capital; Racial Differences; Schooling; Training

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports findings of a study using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) to test the rational choice theory that discrimination discourages investments in human capital. Nearly 60% of the study sample (N=5585) reported job-hiring discrimination (race, nationality, sex, or age) between 1979 and 1982 and they were found to invest more in job training programs and additional schooling between 1983 and 1998 than those reporting no such discrimination. White males were found to have the greatest advantage over black males and females in regard to job training and over black females in regard to additional schooling. Findings suggest that appeals to affirmative action policies and programs based on race and sex remain warranted.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Discrimination and Human Capital: A Challenge to Economic Theory & Social Justice." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 29,2 (June 2002): 105-124.
2. Caputo, Richard K.
Early Education Experiences and School-to-Work Program Participation
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,4 (December 2003): 144-156. also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/30-4.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Head Start; Heterogeneity; Program Participation/Evaluation; Racial Differences; Transition, School to Work; Youth Problems

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study assesses the effects of Head Start participation and demonstrated academic ability during elementary school on School-to-Work (STW) program participation. The study sample comes from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort and comprises 4,370 adolescents who reported grades they received while in the 8th grade and whether or not they ever repeated a grade in grammar school. Findings indicate the STW programs attract disproportionate numbers of students with histories of marginal demonstrated academic ability. This is so because STW programs are also more likely to attract Head Starters. Demonstrated academic ability varies by race/ethnicity and sex, with lower participation rates by white males. The author suggests that efforts to achieve a more heterogeneous racial/ethnic mix of students to take advantage of school-to-work based initiatives would strengthen such programs. In doing so, such efforts would increase the prospects of Head Start participants entering the mainstream of socieoeconomic life in the US more easily than would be the case otherwise. In addition, such efforts would make the US workforce more competitive in an increasingly global economy.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Early Education Experiences and School-to-Work Program Participation." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,4 (December 2003): 144-156.
3. Caputo, Richard K.
Escaping Poverty and Becoming Self-Sufficient
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 24,3 (September 1997): 5-23
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Marital Status; Poverty; Welfare; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using logistic regression analysis on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth this study found that sociodemographic factors were far more influential in determining escape from poverty and becoming self-sufficient than social psychological factors. The number of years respondents lived in poverty was the best predictor of escaping poverty while the number of years respondents made use of public assistance programs was the best predictor of becoming self-sufficient. Marital status and change in the number of hours worked influenced the prospect for escaping poverty though not becoming self-sufficient. Implications regarding the changing philosophy of social welfare from income maintenance to self-sufficiency are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Escaping Poverty and Becoming Self-Sufficient." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 24,3 (September 1997): 5-23.
4. Caputo, Richard K.
Family Characteristics, Public Program Participation, and Civic Engagement
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 37,2 (June 2010): 35-61.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/37-2.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); Family Characteristics; Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Medicaid/Medicare; Social Roles; Volunteer Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study tested for differences on the type and extent of civic engagement between use of visible programs such as Food Stamps and Medicaid and less visible programs such as the Earned Income Tax Credit while accounting for family and sociodemographic characteristics. Policy feedback theory guided the study which used data from the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys. Challenging prior research, means-tested Food Stamps, Medicaid, or EITC program participants were as likely as non-participants to devote time to activities aimed at changing social conditions. What social service agencies can do to enhance civic engagement is discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Family Characteristics, Public Program Participation, and Civic Engagement." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 37,2 (June 2010): 35-61.
5. Caputo, Richard K.
Head Start, Other Preschool Programs, and Life Success in a Youth Cohort
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,2 (June 2003): 105-126.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/30-2.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Economic Well-Being; Head Start; Mobility, Economic; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Preschool Children; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study assesses the effects of Head Start and other preschool programs on five life success measures in a U.S. cohort of youth (N= 5,621). The life successes indices are average annual income-to-poverty ratios, economic mobility, and number of years the youth lived in families whose incomes fell below official poverty thresholds, received Food Stamps, and received TANF/AFDC. Controlling for a variety of background and other factors in separate regression models for each life success measure, results show that youth who participated in preschool programs other than Head Start had higher average annual income-to-poverty ratios than non-preschoolers. Bivariate findings corroborate previous research indicating that Head Starters are economically and behaviorally disadvantaged compared to other preschool and non-preschool children. Multivariate findings of this study also show that Head Starters do as well as non-preschoolers in regard to the four other life success measures. In essence, on these measures Head Starters become mainstreamed by the time they enter the labor force, start their own families, and form their own households, such that they fare no better or worse than other preschoolers and non-preschoolers in regard to economic mobility, years lived in poor families, and receipt of Food Stamps and TANF/AFDC. Findings support continued funding of Head Start but also suggest that higher levels of funding may be necessary to raise family incomes above poverty comparable to other preschool programs.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Head Start, Other Preschool Programs, and Life Success in a Youth Cohort." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,2 (June 2003): 105-126.
6. Caputo, Richard K.
Patterns and Predictors of Debt: A Panel Study, 1985-2008
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 39,2 (June 2012): 7-29.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/39-2.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Debt/Borrowing; Gender Differences; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Income Level; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Marital Status; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Relying on panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), this study finds that about half the study sample (N = 5,304) never experienced annual debt between 1985 and 2008, that the vast majority of those who incurred annual debt were short-term (1 year) or intermittent debtors (2-4 years), that the proportion of the study sample in debt for the most part declined over time, but also that the level of debt increased. Multinomial regression results indicated that health status and level of changes in income are robust predictors of debt in general, that age and race/ethnicity are robust predictors of short-term and intermittent debt, that locus of control, family structure during adolescence, SES, work effort, and marital status are robust predictors of intermittent and chronic debt, and that self-esteem, gender, SES, and work effort are robust predictors of chronic debt. Findings challenge blanket contentions that a culture of debt characterizes individuals and families in the U.S and they present a more nuanced portrait of debtors than the stereotype as young and single.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Patterns and Predictors of Debt: A Panel Study, 1985-2008." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 39,2 (June 2012): 7-29.
7. Caputo, Richard K.
Second-Generation Parenthood: A Panel Study of Grandmother and Grandchild Coresidency among Low-Income Families, 1967-1992
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 27,3 (September 2000): 3-20.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/27-3.htm
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Black Family; Black Studies; Coresidence; Divorce; Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); Ethnic Differences; Family Structure; Family Studies; Grandchildren; Grandmothers; Household Composition; Income Level; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Marital Status; Marriage; Parents, Non-Custodial; Poverty; Racial Differences; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Reports findings of a national study of low-income coresident grandmothers & grandchildren, 1967-1992, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience, Mature Women's Cohort (N = 5,083 US women, ages 30-44, in 1967). Respondents were first interviewed in 1967, & were continuously interviewed until 1992. Results indicate a small increasing minority of women residing with their grandchildren in low-income families over the study period, although the proportion of those who did declined as they reached retirement age. More than 50% of ever-coresident, low-income grandmothers (N = 776) were second-generation parents for 3+ years; the majority (64%) were black. Among ever-coresident, low-income grandmothers in 1992 (N = 521), being black & being single increased the likelihood of being a second-generation parent. Previous low-income coresidency also predicted low-income coresidency in 1992. Further, older low-income second-generation parents were more likely to reside in skipped vs three-generation families, as were those outside the South. It is argued that low-income coresident grandmothers may be adversely affected by time limits associated with the Personal Responsibility & Work Opportunities Act of 1996 (PRA). Changes to the PRA & the Earned Income Tax Credit are discussed. 3 Tables, 1 Figure, 30 References. Adapted from the source document.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Second-Generation Parenthood: A Panel Study of Grandmother and Grandchild Coresidency among Low-Income Families, 1967-1992." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 27,3 (September 2000): 3-20.
8. Caputo, Richard K.
The Earned Income Tax Credit: A Study of Eligible Participants vs. Non-participants
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 33,1 (March 2006): 9-29.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/33-1.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Gender; Marital Status; Poverty; Racial Differences; Residence; Self-Employed Workers; Socioeconomic Factors; Taxes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study (N = 1,504) showed that about half the EITC eligible tax filers in 2001 did not file EITC tax returns and that differences between EITC tax filers and non-EITC tax filers varied by birth place, Food Stamp program participation, marital status, race, residence, sex, socioeconomic history, and worker classification. Findings suggested that the EITC is well targeted in the sense that economically marginalized groups are likely to participate and that increased outreach efforts are also needed to ensure greater participation among tax filers eligible for the EITC but who are less likely to claim it, especially self-employed persons and those residing in the Northeast. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The Earned Income Tax Credit: A Study of Eligible Participants vs. Non-participants." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 33,1 (March 2006): 9-29.
9. Caputo, Richard K.
The Effects of Race and Marital Status on Child Support and Work Effort
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 23,3 (September 1996): 51-68
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Child Support; Divorce; Family Income; Marital Status; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience (NLSLME) Young Women's (cohort to assess the influence of race and marital status on levels of child support and work effort of recipients of child support in 1978, 1983, 1988, and 1991. Controlling for the number of children and highest completed grade of education the study found that race exerted no effect on either level of child support payments or work effort in any of the study years. Marital status influenced level of child support t in each study year and work effort only in 1983 Formerly-married mother had the highest levels of child support as a part of total family income in each study year; while married and never-married recipients of child support had similar lower levels. Also formerly-married mothers had the greatest work effort only in 1983. Implications for child support policies are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The Effects of Race and Marital Status on Child Support and Work Effort." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 23,3 (September 1996): 51-68.
10. Caputo, Richard K.
The Intergenerational Transmission of Grandmother-Grandchild Co-Residency
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 28,1 (March 2001): 79-86.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/28-1.htm
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Black Family; Coresidence; Grandchildren; Grandmothers; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined national data from two women's cohorts to determine the likelihood that Black grandmothers who resided with grandchildren were more likely than other grandmothers were to have daughters who resided with grandchildren. Of 1098 co-resident grandmothers, 390 (36%) were in the younger of the two cohorts, 603 (55%) were in the older, and 105 (9%) were in both, comprising the sub-sample of grandmother-grandchild mother-daughter pairs. A significantly higher proportion of mothers in the grandmother-grandchild mother-daughter pairs were Black (83%) compared to 37% of the mothers among the non-paired ever co-resident grandmothers. The study also found, by proxy, that the co-resident grandmother-grandchild mother-daughter pairs had lower socioeconomic standing than non-paired ever co-resident grandmothers.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Grandmother-Grandchild Co-Residency." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 28,1 (March 2001): 79-86.
11. Eamon, Mary Keegan
Digital Divide in Computer Access and Use Between Poor and Non-Poor Youth
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 31,2 (June 2004): 91-112.
Also: http://imet.csus.edu/imet8/leu/251/articles/Article_Eamon_PoorYouth.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Computer Ownership; Computer Use; Digital Divide; Home Environment; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The main objectives of this study were to examine the "digital divide" in home computer ownership and to evaluate differences in academic and non-academic computer use between poor and non-poor youth. Data from a national sample of 1,029, 10- through 14-year-old young adolescents were analyzed. Results show that poor youth were .36 times as likely to own a home computer, but equally as likely to use their home computer for academic purposes as were non-poor youth. Poor youth did not differ from non-poor youth in how often they used any computer for academic purposes, but were less likely to use any computer for non-academic purposes. Government initiatives to close the digital divide and foster computer use among poor youth are suggested.
Bibliography Citation
Eamon, Mary Keegan. "Digital Divide in Computer Access and Use Between Poor and Non-Poor Youth." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 31,2 (June 2004): 91-112.
12. Finch, Stephen J.
Farberman, Harvey A.
Neus, Jordan
Adams, Richard E.
Price-Baker, Deirdre
Differential Test Performance in the American Educational System: The Impact of Race and Gender
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 29,3 (September 2002): 89-108.
Also: http://scholarworks.wmich.edu/jssw/vol29/iss3/6/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; I.Q.; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Contrary to Herrnstein and Murray (1994) who claim that racial groups have different cognitive endowments and that these best explain differential test score achievements, our regression analyses document that there is less improvement in test scores per year of education for African-Americans and women. That is, the observed group test score differences do not appear to be due to racial cognitive differences but rather to other factors associated with group-linked experiences in the educational system. We found that 666 of the subjects in the Herrnstein-Murray database had actual IQ scores derived from school records. Using these as independent controls for IQ, we document that each of the test components that were the basis of the Herrnstein-Murray "IQ" scores was significantly associated with education level (p< .001). Consequently, their IQ score appears to be an education-related measure rather than an IQ test, and thus challenges the validity of their analysis.
Bibliography Citation
Finch, Stephen J., Harvey A. Farberman, Jordan Neus, Richard E. Adams and Deirdre Price-Baker. "Differential Test Performance in the American Educational System: The Impact of Race and Gender." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 29,3 (September 2002): 89-108.
13. Kozimor-King, Michele Lee
Does Belief Matter? Social Psychological Characteristics and the Likelihood of Welfare Use and Exit
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 35,1 (March 2008): 197-219.
Also: https://secure.touchnet.net/C21782_ustores/web/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCTID=820
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Human Capital; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Occupational Status; Psychological Effects; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Numerous studies have reemerged examining social psychological variables as predictors of individual differences in the human experience. Still, current research focusing on the effects of self-beliefs on welfare use and exit is limited. This study examines the effects of social psychological variables on the likelihood of welfare use and five-year outcomes of women using data from the 1979 through 2000 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Binary logistic regression estimates suggest that social psychological characteristics are initially related to welfare use, but do not remain once control variables are introduced. While social psychological predictors do not appear to have strong or robust direct effects in multivariate models, traditional human capital variables of public assistance outcomes past initial entry are significant. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare is the property of Western Michigan University and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Kozimor-King, Michele Lee. "Does Belief Matter? Social Psychological Characteristics and the Likelihood of Welfare Use and Exit ." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 35,1 (March 2008): 197-219.
14. Mizell, C. André
Racial and Gender Variations in the Process Shaping Earnings' Potential: The Consequences of Poverty in Early Adulthood
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 27,2 (June 2000): 113-138.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/27-2.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Earnings; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Income; Job Tenure; Occupational Attainment; Occupational Status; Poverty; Racial Differences; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates the effects of poverty in early adulthood on future earnings. While social scientists are beginning to amass a considerable literature on the effects of poverty on outcomes for children, few have investigated the damage that impoverishment may do in early adulthood when individuals are in the midst of completing education and planning careers. The findings in this study indicate that poverty does dampen earnings' potential. However, individual characteristics (e.g., aspirations, esteem and ability) and structural location (e.g., educational attainment, occupational status and job tenure) may assuage the otherwise negative effects of poverty. Other findings reveal that the process shaping earnings is very similar for white males compared to racial minorities and women. One exception is the impact of weekly hours worked on earnings. White males receive a benefit to earnings from weekly hours worked above and beyond that of White women, African American men, African American women and Mexican American women. Additionally, white men's earnings remain higher than African Americans, Mexican Americans and white women because of higher occupational attainment and longer job tenure.
Bibliography Citation
Mizell, C. André. "Racial and Gender Variations in the Process Shaping Earnings' Potential: The Consequences of Poverty in Early Adulthood." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 27,2 (June 2000): 113-138.
15. Stewart, Jennifer
The Mommy Track: The Consequences of Gender Ideology and Aspirations on Age at First Motherhood
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,2 (June 2003): 3-30.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/30-2.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Birth; Childbearing; Disadvantaged, Economically; Family Background; Fertility; Gender Differences; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While there is extensive and compelling evidence that growing up in an impoverished background leads to early fertility, few studies explain why early socioeconomic disadvantage leads to early childbearing. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I test whether gender ideology, as well as educational and occupational aspirations, mediates the connection between poverty and teen fertility patterns. Traditional gender ideology depresses age at first motherhood. Adolescent aspirations appear to act as protective factors in the production of early pregnancy.[ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
(PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Stewart, Jennifer. "The Mommy Track: The Consequences of Gender Ideology and Aspirations on Age at First Motherhood." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,2 (June 2003): 3-30.
16. Zhan, Min
Economic Mobility of Single Mothers: The Role of Assets and Human Capital Development
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 33,4 (December 2006): 127-150.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/33-4.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Human Capital; Mobility, Economic; Mobility, Labor Market; Parents, Single; Poverty; Training, Employee; Training, Occupational; Training, On-the-Job; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the economic mobility of single mothers. It highlights the relationships between single mothers' financial assets and human capital development (educational advancement, job training, and work hours) with their economic mobility. Analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) indicates that assets may help improve upward economic mobility. Assets, however, have differential impact on single mothers with different income levels. In addition, human capital development mediates the positive link between assets and the economic mobility for mothers living between the 100% and 200% federal poverty. These results support asset building as an investment strategy to enhance the long-term economic wellbeing of single mothers. The findings also underscore the importance of examining within-group variations among single mothers in designing effective asset-building policies and programs. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare is the property of Western Michigan University and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min. "Economic Mobility of Single Mothers: The Role of Assets and Human Capital Development." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 33,4 (December 2006): 127-150.
17. Zhan, Min
The Impact of Youth Debt on College Graduation
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 41,3 (September 2014): 133-156
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Assets; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Ethnic Differences; Family Resources; Racial Differences; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the associations between educational loans and credit card debt with the possibility of college graduation among a group of youth who enrolled in college. It further investigates whether the associations differ by levels of parental assets. Results indicate that, after parental assets and other variables are considered, educational loans are positively related to college graduation; however, there is evidence that educational loans above $10,000 reduce the probability of college graduation. Parental assets are positively linked to youth's college graduation, and the relationship between educational loans and college graduation is stronger among youth whose families have lower levels of financial assets. Credit card debt is positively related to college graduation only among families with modest financial assets. Policy implications are considered.
Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min. "The Impact of Youth Debt on College Graduation." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 41,3 (September 2014): 133-156.