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Source: Journal of Youth Studies
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Brakenhoff, Brittany
Jang, Bohyun
Slesnick, Natasha
Snyder, Anastasia R.
Longitudinal Predictors of Homelessness: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-97
Journal of Youth Studies 18,8 (2015): 1015-1034.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13676261.2015.1020930
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Family Environment; Family Structure; Homelessness; Parenting Skills/Styles; Runaways

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Homeless youth represent a vulnerable and understudied population. Little research has prospectively identified factors that may place youth at risk for experiencing homelessness. The current study utilizes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-97 (NLSY-97) to examine predictors of experiencing homelessness as a young adult (before age 25). The NLSY-97 includes a nationally representative sample of 8984 youth. Data were first collected from these youth when they were between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The current study examined whether individual and family risk factors reported during adolescence predict homelessness by the age of 25. The findings showed that multiple runaway episodes, nontraditional family structure, lower educational attainment, and parental work limitations due to health increased the risk of homelessness. A permissive parenting style and being Hispanic protected against homelessness. This study offers unique insight into risk and protective factors for youth homelessness and has important clinical implications.
Bibliography Citation
Brakenhoff, Brittany, Bohyun Jang, Natasha Slesnick and Anastasia R. Snyder. "Longitudinal Predictors of Homelessness: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-97." Journal of Youth Studies 18,8 (2015): 1015-1034.
2. Carlson, Daniel L.
Challenges and Transformations: Childbearing and Changes in Teens' Educational Aspirations and Expectations
Journal of Youth Studies 19,5 (May 2016): 706-724.
Also: http://tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13676261.2015.1098771
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Parenthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although much of the focus on teen childbearing has been on its potential costs to teen parents and their children, emerging research suggests that teen childbearing while challenging can be a positively transformative experience for teens. One such transformation is enhanced educational aspirations and expectations. Much of the research on the positive consequences of teen childbearing for teens' educational orientations, however, has come from in-depth interviews with teen mothers that have methodological limitations. Using panel data from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and NLSY79 – Young Adult Survey 1994 (NLSY79-YA) this study finds that over time, teens' educational expectations and aspirations increase, on average, regardless of parental status. Nevertheless, there is significant heterogeneity in how expectations and aspirations change. Teen parents have lower odds of increasing, and greater odds of decreasing, their aspirations and expectations over a 2-year period compared to their childless counterparts. These patterns, however, shift across cohorts. Unlike the NLSY79, there are no differences in the odds of lowering aspirations and expectations between teen parents and non-parents in the NLSY79-YA. Moreover, the lower odds of increasing aspirations/expectations among mothers and white teen parents compared to fathers and black teen parents in the NLSY79 cohort are not found in the NLSY79-YA.
Bibliography Citation
Carlson, Daniel L. "Challenges and Transformations: Childbearing and Changes in Teens' Educational Aspirations and Expectations." Journal of Youth Studies 19,5 (May 2016): 706-724.
3. Glassner, Steven D.
Cho, Sujung
Bullying Victimization, Negative Emotions, and Substance Use: Utilizing General Strain Theory to Examine the Undesirable Outcomes of Childhood Bullying Victimization in Adolescence and young adulthood
Journal of Youth Studies 21,9 (2018): 1232-1249.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13676261.2018.1461200?journalCode=cjys20
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Bullying/Victimization; Gender Differences; Health, Mental; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bullying victimization has been directly associated with a variety of negative outcomes, but there are still many unknowns as to how deleterious emotional states resulting from victimization influence other undesirable events. The current study draws on Agnew's general strain theory to examine multiple outcomes of youth victimized by repeated bullying prior to adolescence. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 were used to examine indicators of diminished moods and negative emotions on substance use for bullying victims in adolescence and again during young adulthood. Findings from various LISERL models indicate that bullying victimization directly increases diminished moods for males and females in adolescence. Additionally, childhood bullying victimization directly increases substance use in adolescence and young adulthood for males but not females. Finally, diminished moods in adolescence and negative emotions in young adulthood increase substance use for females but not for males. Policy implications and limitations for this analysis are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Glassner, Steven D. and Sujung Cho. "Bullying Victimization, Negative Emotions, and Substance Use: Utilizing General Strain Theory to Examine the Undesirable Outcomes of Childhood Bullying Victimization in Adolescence and young adulthood." Journal of Youth Studies 21,9 (2018): 1232-1249.
4. Kerr, Jelani
Minh, Anita
Siddiqi, Arjumand
Muntaner, Carles
O'Campo, Patricia
A Cross-Country Comparison of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Marijuana Use among Youth Who Are Employed, in School or Out of the Labor Force and School (OLFS)
Journal of Youth Studies published online (9 October 2018): DOI: 10.1080/13676261.2018.1529862.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13676261.2018.1529862
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Canada, Canadian; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Cross-national Analysis; Drug Use; Labor Force Participation; Unemployment, Youth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Labor force and school attachment may influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use in the US and Canada. Differences in social welfare provision, which provide protections for individuals with insecure attachments to the labor force or education, may in turn impact the behavior and health of youth in these countries. Yet, there is little research to understand the health consequences for youth of being out of the labor force and school (OLFS). Data of 25-29 year old participants of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (year 2010) and the Canadian Community Health Survey (2009-2010) were used to examine differences in substance use by labor force and school attachment. Logistic regression suggests that OLFS in the US and Canada were less likely to report alcohol uptake and more likely to use tobacco compared to employed youth. Unemployment was differentially associated with substance use behaviors by country. Country of residence and subsequent exposure to social welfare policy does not appear to impact substance use behaviors among OLFS. However, associations of unemployment and gender by country indicates differences in substance use behavior. More research should seek to understand factors that influence alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among OLFS and unemployed youth.
Bibliography Citation
Kerr, Jelani, Anita Minh, Arjumand Siddiqi, Carles Muntaner and Patricia O'Campo. "A Cross-Country Comparison of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Marijuana Use among Youth Who Are Employed, in School or Out of the Labor Force and School (OLFS)." Journal of Youth Studies published online (9 October 2018): DOI: 10.1080/13676261.2018.1529862.