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Source: Journals of Gerontology: Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Shippee, Tetyana P.
Wilkinson, Lindsay R.
Schafer, Markus H.
Shippee, Nathan
Long-Term Effects of Age Discrimination on Mental Health: The Role of Perceived Financial Strain
Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-017-9371-3
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Discrimination, Age; Discrimination, Job; Family Income; Life Satisfaction; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis

Methods: Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (1967–2003), we employ nested growth curve models to evaluate whether perceived age discrimination at work influences women's depressive symptoms and life satisfaction and whether perceived financial strain mediates this relationship.

Results: Women who experienced age discrimination had greater overall depressive symptoms but not after controlling for financial strain. We found evidence that age discrimination affected financial strain, which, in turn, increased women's depressive symptoms. Women who reported age discrimination had lower odds of being in higher categories of overall life satisfaction; financial strain partially mediated the relationship but age discrimination remained a significant predictor.

Bibliography Citation
Shippee, Tetyana P., Lindsay R. Wilkinson, Markus H. Schafer and Nathan Shippee. "Long-Term Effects of Age Discrimination on Mental Health: The Role of Perceived Financial Strain." Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.
2. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Student Debt Spans Generations: Characteristics of Parents Who Borrow to Pay for Their Children's College Education
The Journals of Gerontology: Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 72,6 (October 2017): 1084-1089.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/psychsocgerontology/article/72/6/1084/2645641
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): College Cost; Debt/Borrowing; Parental Investments; Student Loans

Objectives: Discussions of student debt often overlook the debt parents take on to pay for their children's education. We identify characteristics of parents with child-related educational debt among the late baby boom cohort.

Method: Data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a nationally representative sample of individuals born between 1957 and 1964. We restrict our sample to parents who had any children aged ≥17 and answered questions on educational debt during midlife (n = 6,562). Craggit models estimated (a) having any child-related educational debt and (b) the amount of debt owed among debtors.

Results: Black parents and parents with more education, higher income, and higher net worth were more likely to report child-related educational debt than White parents and parents with no degree, low-income, or negative net worth. Among debtors, high-income parents had more debt than low-income parents.

Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle and Jennifer A. Ailshire. "Student Debt Spans Generations: Characteristics of Parents Who Borrow to Pay for Their Children's College Education." The Journals of Gerontology: Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 72,6 (October 2017): 1084-1089.