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Source: Longitudinal and Life Course Studies
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Joshi, Heather
Verropoulou, Georgia
Does Mothers' Employment Affect Children's Development: Evidence from the Children of the British 1970 Birth Cohort and the American NLSY79
Longitudinal and Life Course Studies 1,1 (May 2009): 95-115
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Longview
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); British Cohort Study (BCS); Child Care; Child Health; Family Structure; Job Characteristics; Maternal Employment; NCDS - National Child Development Study (British); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background
The increasing employment of mothers of young children in the UK and the USA is widely believed to affect children adversely. Maternity leave and part-time employment, more common in the UK than the US, are possible offsets.

Methods
This paper analyses the cognitive and behavioural development of school-aged children by maternal employment before the child's first birthday. Data come from the second generation of two cohort studies: the 1970 British Birth Cohort Study (BCS70) and the US 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth Child (NLSY79). Both contain several outcomes per child, in some cases several children per mother. The hierarchical structure is tackled by multi-level modelling. Each data set supplies a good array of controls for confounding variables (such as maternal education and ability, family history) which may affect labour market participation.

Results
Similar to other studies, results are mixed and modest. Only two out of five US estimates of maternal employment in the child's first year have a significant (0.05 level) coefficient on child development – negative for reading comprehension, positive for freedom from internalized behaviour problems. None of the estimates were significant for four child outcomes modelled in Britain.

Conclusions
Despite public opinion to the contrary, our study finds little evidence of harm to school-age children from maternal employment during a child's infancy, especially if employment is part-time, and in a context, such as Britain in the 1990s, where several months of maternity leave is the norm.

Bibliography Citation
Cooksey, Elizabeth C., Heather Joshi and Georgia Verropoulou. "Does Mothers' Employment Affect Children's Development: Evidence from the Children of the British 1970 Birth Cohort and the American NLSY79." Longitudinal and Life Course Studies 1,1 (May 2009): 95-115.
2. Scott, Marc
Zeidenberg, Matthew
Order or Chaos? Understanding Career Mobility Using Categorical Clustering and Information Theory
Longitudinal and Life Course Studies 7,4 (2016): 320-346.
Also: http://www.llcsjournal.org/index.php/llcs/article/view/358
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Longitudinal and Life Course Studies
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Mobility, Job; Mobility, Labor Market; Occupations; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We examine the careers of a nationally representative US cohort of young adults using sequence analysis and information-theoretic techniques to describe these careers' structure and how this structure might inform differences in wage mobility. We operationalise the career as a sequence of industry-occupation pairs observed quarterly. We investigate how the content of these pairs and their organisation over time relate to future mobility. We perform the analysis across three different mobility groups, one of which is characterised by persistent low-wage work. Contrary to what one might expect, low-wage work is not typified by a lack of structure, even in many of the careers in which the worker is weakly attached to the labour market. Using clustering techniques customised to this problem, we build a typology of careers within three groups of workers defined by their wage mobility. We find significant variation within, as well as similarity across the three groups, enhancing our understanding of careers with different levels of mobility.
Bibliography Citation
Scott, Marc and Matthew Zeidenberg. "Order or Chaos? Understanding Career Mobility Using Categorical Clustering and Information Theory." Longitudinal and Life Course Studies 7,4 (2016): 320-346.
3. Simon Thomas, Juli
Health Effects of Work and Family Transitions
Longitudinal and Life Course Studies 9,4 (2018): 412-432.
Also: http://www.llcsjournal.org/index.php/llcs/article/view/507
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Divorce; Employment, History; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Disruptive life events, including transitions in work or family structure, affect health. Research often focuses on one transition rather than thinking of an event framework in which respondents experience multiple transitions across qualitatively distinct domains. This paper contributes original evidence on the effects of event interaction, transition timing, and multiple occurrences of events on health outcomes. I look at employment loss, employment gain, marriage, and divorce as instances of disruptive transitions or instability in the life course; I analyse these events' effects on self-rated health and depression at ages 40 and 50. I show that employment losses and divorces have significant negative effects on health, and employment gains and marriages show smaller positive effects or null effects. Higher counts of transitions lead to stronger effects on health. Respondents who are older at event occurrence show larger negative effects, suggesting that work and family instability at early ages is not as detrimental to health as such instability at later ages. These results show that there are similarities across work and family domains in effects on health outcomes; moreover, experiencing several transitions can lead to overlaps in effects that might lessen or worsen health outcomes overall.
Bibliography Citation
Simon Thomas, Juli. "Health Effects of Work and Family Transitions." Longitudinal and Life Course Studies 9,4 (2018): 412-432.