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Source: Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Dembe, Allard E.
Erickson, J. Bianca
Delbos, Rachel G.
Banks, Steven M.
The Impact of Overtime and Long Work Hours on Occupational Injuries and Illnesses: New Evidence from the United States
Occuptional and Environmental Medicine 62 (2005):588–597.
Also: http://oem.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/62/9/588
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Ltd. - British Medical Journal Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Commuting/Type, Time, Method; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Injuries; Work Histories; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Aims: To analyse the impact of overtime and extended working hours on the risk of occupational injuries and illnesses among a nationally representative sample of working adults from the United States.

Methods: Responses from 10 793 Americans participating in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) were used to evaluate workers' job histories, work schedules, and occurrence of occupational injury and illness between 1987 and 2000. A total of 110 236 job records were analysed, encompassing 89 729 person-years of accumulated working time. Aggregated incidence rates in each of five exposure categories were calculated for each NLSY survey period. Multivariate analytical techniques were used to estimate the relative risk of long working hours per day, extended hours per week, long commute times, and overtime schedules on reporting a work related injury or illness, after adjusting for age, gender, occupation, industry, and region.

Results/: After adjusting for those factors, working in jobs with overtime schedules was associated with a 61% higher injury hazard rate compared to jobs without overtime. Working at least 12 hours per day was associated with a 37% increased hazard rate and working at least 60 hours per week was associated with a 23% increased hazard rate. A strong dose-response effect was observed, with the injury rate (per 100 accumulated worker-years in a particular schedule) increasing in correspondence to the number of hours per day (or per week) in the workers' customary schedule.

Conclusions: Results suggest that job schedules with long working hours are not more risky merely because they are concentrated in inherently hazardous industries or occupations, or because people working long hours spend more total time "at risk" for a work injury. Strategies to prevent work injuries should consider changes in scheduling practices, job redesign, and health protection programmes for people working in jo bs involving overtime and extended hours.

Bibliography Citation
Dembe, Allard E., J. Bianca Erickson, Rachel G. Delbos and Steven M. Banks. "The Impact of Overtime and Long Work Hours on Occupational Injuries and Illnesses: New Evidence from the United States." Occuptional and Environmental Medicine 62 (2005):588–597. A.
2. Dong, Xiuwen Sue
Wang, Xuanwen
Largay, Julie
Job Exposures, Health Behaviours, and Work-related Injuries among young Construction Workers in the United States: a 12-year Follow-up Study
Occupational and Environmental Medicine 71,S1 (June 2014): A43-A44.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25018360
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Ltd. - British Medical Journal Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Blue-Collar Jobs; Body Mass Index (BMI); Industrial Classification; Injuries, Workplace; Obesity; Occupations; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVES: Young construction workers are at increased risk for occupational injuries. This study aimed to identify factors associated with work-related injuries within this worker group in order to provide insight for injury interventions. METHOD: Data from nine waves (1988-2000) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort (NLSY79, N=12 686), were studied. Construction workers included those who worked in the construction industry for at least one wave. Job exposures were measured by frequency and types of physical efforts, number of waves worked in blue-collar jobs, and hours worked per week. Health behaviours were composed of body mass index, and dose of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine use. Multivariate logistic regression was employed to estimate the association between selected factors and work-related injuries after controlling for possible confounders.

RESULTS: During the 12-year follow-up period, 47% of the construction cohort experienced work-related injuries compared to 29% for their non-construction counterparts. The logistic regression results indicated that both job exposures and personal behaviours were associated with work-related injuries: blue-collar occupations (OR =4.24, 95% CI: 2.54-7.07); physical efforts (OR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.20-2.48); worked over 50 h per week (OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.11-3.28); rotating/split shift (OR=2.99, 95% CI: 1.25-7.16); obesity (OR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.04-2.41); and cocaine use on more than 10 occasions (OR=1.98, 95% CI: 1.31-2.99).

CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated that construction interventions should be developed to address preventable risk factors. Young construction workers could benefit not only from enhanced work-place injury preventions, but also health behaviour interventions.

©2014, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

Bibliography Citation
Dong, Xiuwen Sue, Xuanwen Wang and Julie Largay. "Job Exposures, Health Behaviours, and Work-related Injuries among young Construction Workers in the United States: a 12-year Follow-up Study." Occupational and Environmental Medicine 71,S1 (June 2014): A43-A44.