Search Results

Source: pittsburgh post-gazette
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. McLaughlin, Patricia
Families Swept Away by Fear of Housework
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Friday, October 21, 1994, Sooner Edition, Magazine Plus, Lifestyle; Pg. 1
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: P.G. Publishing Company, Inc.
Keyword(s): Family Studies; Gender Differences; Household Structure; Housework/Housewives

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Wouldn't it be something if the American family were finally to be done in NOT by drugs, fluoridated water, welfare dependency, Hillary Clinton or gangsta rap, but by the continued reluctance of regular guys -- upstanding middle-class Republicans, many of them -- to do their fair share of the housework? Linda Waite thinks it's already happening. And she isn't just making it up to scare her husband into emptying the dishwasher; she has proof. Waite, a professor of sociology at the University of Chicago, and Frances Goldscheider, a sociology professor at Brown University, have been analyzing data from the vast National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience, begun by the U.S. Department of Labor in the late 1960s. The surveys followed 5,000 young men and women and 5,000 older ones for a 15-year period to find out how we live now.
Bibliography Citation
McLaughlin, Patricia. "Families Swept Away by Fear of Housework." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Friday, October 21, 1994, Sooner Edition, Magazine Plus, Lifestyle; Pg. 1.
2. Ross, Sherwood
Lower Worker Satisfaction A Problem For Employers
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, April 13, 1997, Business; Pg. C-2
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: P.G. Publishing Company, Inc.
Keyword(s): Intelligence; Job Patterns; Job Satisfaction; Job Tenure; Job Turnover

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on Mary Roznowski's study of the relationship between employee's initial job satisfaction and their likelihood of quitting those jobs. The study, which utilized NLSY data, found that job satisfaction makes an employee less likely to quit at first, but after four years there is no difference in likelihood between those who initially reported high job satisfaction and those who did not.
Bibliography Citation
Ross, Sherwood. "Lower Worker Satisfaction A Problem For Employers." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, April 13, 1997, Business; Pg. C-2.