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Source: Preventive Medicine
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Dutra, Lauren M.
Glantz, Stanton A.
Thirty-day Smoking in Adolescence is a Strong Predictor of Smoking in Young Adulthood
Preventive Medicine 109 (April 2018): 17-21.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S009174351830015X
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Transition, Adulthood

Thirty-day smoking, although a widely used measure of adolescent smoking (age 12-16), has been questioned as an accurate measure of young adult (age 26-30) smoking behavior, particularly when critiquing studies linking use of e-cigarettes with subsequent cigarette smoking. We used logistic regression to test two measures of 30-day adolescent smoking as predictors of young adult smoking in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Adjusting for psychosocial covariates, compared to those who smoked zero days in the past 30 days in adolescence, odds of any past-30-day smoking in young adulthood ranged from 2.85 (95% CI: 1.85-4.37) for those who smoked 1 day to 4.81 (3.50-6.59) for those who smoked daily as adolescents, and adjusted odds of daily smoking in young adulthood ranged from 1.99 (1.24-3.18) to 4.69 (3.42-6.43). Compared with adolescent never smokers, adjusted odds of any past-30-day smoking in young adulthood among adolescent former smokers was 2.11 (1.77-2.53), and among adolescent current smokers, ranged from 3.03 (2.22-4.14) for those who smoked 1-5 cigarettes per month to 8.19 (5.80-11.55) for those who smoked daily. Adjusted odds of daily smoking in young adulthood were 2.49 (2.12-2.91) for adolescent former smokers and, among adolescent current smokers, ranged from 2.54 (1.92-3.37) for those who smoked 1-5 cigarettes per month to 8.65 (6.06-12.35) for those who smoked daily. There is a strong dose-response relationship between 30-day smoking in adolescence--even a single day in the month--and 30-day and daily smoking in young adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Dutra, Lauren M. and Stanton A. Glantz. "Thirty-day Smoking in Adolescence is a Strong Predictor of Smoking in Young Adulthood." Preventive Medicine 109 (April 2018): 17-21.
2. Feigelman, William
Cigarette Smoking Among Former Military Service Personnel. A Neglected Social Issue
Preventive Medicine 23,2 (March 1994): 235-241.
Also: http://www.idealibrary.com/links/artid/pmed.1994.1032
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Behavior; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); General Social Survey (GSS); Military Personnel; Military Service; Veterans

Based on secondary analysis of archival data from the General Social Surveys and the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth, this article examines smoking among active military personnel, veterans, and comparable civilian populations. Results conformed with past research and indicated higher smoking rates for currently active military personnel than for contemporary civilians. Findings among men and women who were in their thirties during the early 1980s suggest that military personnel and civilians alike exhibited the same tendency toward cigarette use and initiated smoking at approximately the same ages. Military smoking did not appear to be a situational behavior which occurred only during a recruit's tour of duty; results also suggest that previous military experience was associated with higher lifelong patterns of cigarette consumption, compared to those who had never been in the armed services.
Bibliography Citation
Feigelman, William. "Cigarette Smoking Among Former Military Service Personnel. A Neglected Social Issue." Preventive Medicine 23,2 (March 1994): 235-241.
3. Hernandez, Daphne C.
Pressler, Emily
Gender Disparities among the Association between Cumulative Family-level Stress & Adolescent Weight Status
Preventive Medicine 73 (April 2015): 60-66.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743515000158
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Family Environment; Family Influences; Gender Differences; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Health; Obesity; Poverty; Stress; Weight

Objective: To investigate precursors to gender-related obesity disparities by examining multiple family-level stress indices.

Methods: Analyses was based on adolescents born between 1975 and 1991 to women from the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth data set (N=4762). Three types of family-level stressors were captured from birth to age 15: family disruption and conflict, financial strain, and maternal risky health behaviors, along with a total cumulative risk index. Body mass index was constructed on reference criteria for children outlined by the Centers for Disease Control. Multivariate logistic regressions were conducted for the three types of family stressors and for the total cumulative index.

Results: The accumulation of family disruption and conflict and financial stress was positively related to female adolescents being overweight/obese. Childhood exposure to maternal risky health behaviors was positively associated with higher weight status for male adolescents. Total cumulative stress was related to overweight/obesity for females, but not males.

Conclusion: Different family-level stress indices are associated with the weight status of female and male adolescents. Combining types of family-level stress into one cumulative index appears to mask these differences.

Bibliography Citation
Hernandez, Daphne C. and Emily Pressler. "Gender Disparities among the Association between Cumulative Family-level Stress & Adolescent Weight Status." Preventive Medicine 73 (April 2015): 60-66.
4. Kerr, William C.
Williams, Edwina
Li, Libo
Lui, Camillia K.
Ye, Yu
Greenfield, Thomas K.
Lown, E. Anne
Alcohol Use Patterns and Risk of Diabetes Onset in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort
Preventive Medicine 109 (April 2018): 22-27.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743518300100
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); Health, Chronic Conditions; Life Course

One of the major limitations in studying alcohol's effect on risk for diabetes is the issue of classifying drinking patterns across the life course prior to the onset of diabetes. Furthermore, this research often overlooks important life course risk factors such as obesity and early-life health problems that may complicate estimation of the relationship between alcohol and diabetes. This study used data from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort of 14-21 year olds followed through 2012 (n = 8289). Alcohol use was captured through time-varying measures of past month volume and frequency of days with 6+ drinks. Discrete-time survival models controlling for demographics, early-life characteristics and time-varying risk factors of employment, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) group, stratified by sex and race/ethnicity, were estimated. Increased odds of diabetes onset was found among lifetime abstainers for women compared to the low volume reference group (odds ratio (OR) 1.57; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.07–2.3). Increased odds of diabetes onset was also found among women who reported drinking 6+ drinks in a day on a weekly basis during the prior 10 years (OR 1.55; CI 1.04–2.31). Models interacting alcohol and BMI groups found increased odds of diabetes onset from lifetime abstention among overweight women only (OR 3.06; CI 1.67–5.60). This study confirms previous findings of protective effects from low volume drinking compared to lifetime abstention and harmful effects from regular heavy occasion drinking for women. Further, protective effects in this US sample were found to be limited to overweight women only.
Bibliography Citation
Kerr, William C., Edwina Williams, Libo Li, Camillia K. Lui, Yu Ye, Thomas K. Greenfield and E. Anne Lown. "Alcohol Use Patterns and Risk of Diabetes Onset in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort." Preventive Medicine 109 (April 2018): 22-27.
5. Robinson, Camille
Cohen, Alison K.
Rehkopf, David
Deardorff, Julianna
Ritchie, Lorrene
Jayaweera, Ruvani T.
Coyle, Jeremy R.
Abrams, Barbara
Pregnancy and Post-delivery Maternal Weight Changes and Overweight in Preschool Children
Preventive Medicine 60 (March 2014): 77-82.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S009174351300488X
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Obesity; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Weight

Objectives: High maternal weight before and during pregnancy contributes to child obesity. To assess the additional role of weight change after delivery, we examined associations between pre- and post-pregnancy weight changes and preschooler overweight.

Methods: Sample: 4359 children from the Children and Young Adults of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) born to 2816 NLSY mothers between 1979 and 2006 and followed to age 4–5 years old. Exposures: gestational weight gain (GWG) and post-delivery maternal weight change (PDWC). Outcome: child overweight (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 85th percentile).

Results: Adjusted models suggested that both increased GWG (OR: 1.08 per 5 kg GWG, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.16) and excessive GWG (OR: 1.29 versus adequate GWG, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.56) were associated with preschooler overweight. Maternal weight change after delivery was also independently associated with child overweight (OR: 1.12 per 5 kg PDWC, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.21). Associations were stronger among children with overweight or obese mothers.

Conclusions: Increased maternal weight gain both during and after pregnancy predicted overweight in preschool children. Our results suggest that healthy post-pregnancy weight may join normal pre-pregnancy BMI and adequate GWG as a potentially modifiable risk factor for child overweight.

Bibliography Citation
Robinson, Camille, Alison K. Cohen, David Rehkopf, Julianna Deardorff, Lorrene Ritchie, Ruvani T. Jayaweera, Jeremy R. Coyle and Barbara Abrams. "Pregnancy and Post-delivery Maternal Weight Changes and Overweight in Preschool Children." Preventive Medicine 60 (March 2014): 77-82.
6. Sobol-Goldberg, Shira
Rabinowitz, Jonathan
Association of Childhood and Teen School Performance and Obesity in Young Adulthood in the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Preventive Medicine 89 (August 2016): 57-63.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S009174351630086X
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Body Mass Index (BMI); Children, Academic Development; Gender Differences; Modeling, Logit; Obesity; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Racial Differences; School Performance; School Suspension/Expulsion

Background: The literature suggests an association between poor school performance and obesity. However, little is known about academic achievement and behavior as possible risk factors for future obesity.

Method: The analysis was based on data from 3172 participants aged 6 to 25 years from the US National Longitudinal Survey conducted 1986 to 2010. Academic achievement, behavior problems and body mass index (BMI) were assessed at childhood (6-9) and teenhood (10-14). Height and weight were self-reported at pre-young adulthood (15-18) and young adulthood (19-25).

Results: Based on logistic regression stratified by sex and race/ethnicity, academic and behavioral deficiencies during childhood and teenhood were risk factors for young adult obesity with some sex and ethnic/racial differences. The highest prevalence of obesity by race/ethnicity and sex are as follows: black/Hispanic females, those in the lowest quartile of teen reading and math (32.8%); black/Hispanic males, those in lowest quartile of teen reading (26.1%); white males, those in the highest quartile of behavioral problems (21.9%); and white females, those in the lowest quartile teen math (23.2%).

Conclusion: Poor school performance in childhood and teenhood are associated with an increased risk of adult obesity. Prospective studies should further examine the association of school performance and adult obesity and whether programs directed at improving school performance may have secondary gains in preventing obesity.

Bibliography Citation
Sobol-Goldberg, Shira and Jonathan Rabinowitz. "Association of Childhood and Teen School Performance and Obesity in Young Adulthood in the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Preventive Medicine 89 (August 2016): 57-63.