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Source: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT) - UMI
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Braun, Christine
Essays on Frictional Labor Markets and Measurement
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Crime; Geocoded Data; Job Search; Labor Market Outcomes; Minimum Wage; State-Level Data/Policy; Unemployment Insurance

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The first essay asks the question: How do changes in the minimum wage affect criminal activity? I answer this question by describing a frictional world in which a worker's criminal actions are linked to his labor market outcomes. The model is calibrated to match labor market outcomes and crime decisions of workers from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, and shows that the relationship between the aggregate crime rate and the minimum wage is U-shaped. The results from the calibrated model as well as empirical evidence from county level crime data and state level minimum wage changes from 1995 to 2014 suggest that the crime minimizing minimum to median wage ratio for 16-19 year olds is 0.91. However, the welfare maximizing minimum to median wage ratio is 0.87, not equal to the crime minimizing value.

The second essay, joint with Ben Griffy, Bryan Engelhardt and Peter Rupert, asks the question: Is the arrival rate of a job independent of the wage that it pays? We answer this question by testing how, and to what extent, unemployment insurance changes the hazard rate of leaving unemployment across the wage distribution using a Mixed Proportional Hazard Competing Risk Model and data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Controlling for worker characteristics we reject that job arrival rates are independent of the wages offered. We apply the results to several prominent job-search models and interpret how our findings are key to determining the efficacy of unemployment insurance.

Bibliography Citation
Braun, Christine. Essays on Frictional Labor Markets and Measurement. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2018.
2. Hemez, Paul
Military Service and Entry into Marriage: Comparing Service Members to Civilians
M.A. Thesis, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green State University, 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Event History; Marriage; Military Enlistment; Military Service

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The military offers a springboard to economic stability during a time when it is increasingly difficult for young minority and disadvantaged men to achieve such stability. While enlisting in the armed forces was positively associated with entry into marriage during the first fifteen years of the all-volunteer force, the relationship between military service and entry into marriage among subsequent generations of young adults has been unexplored. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, the present study aims to examine the influence of enlistment on entry into marriage for a contemporary cohort of young men. A specific focus is to consider whether the race and social class marriage gap persists between enlistees and civilians. Event-history analyses reveal that young men who served (between 1997 and 2011) were significantly more likely to marry, than their civilian counterparts. Furthermore, there was no difference in the odds of marriage among Black and White men in the military, while some evidence suggests that Hispanic enlistees were more likely to marry than Whites who also enlisted. These findings offer insights into pathways to marriage for social groups who are disadvantaged in the marriage market.
Bibliography Citation
Hemez, Paul. Military Service and Entry into Marriage: Comparing Service Members to Civilians. M.A. Thesis, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green State University, 2017.
3. Kantenga, Kory
Essays on Wage Inequality Using the Search Framework
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Job Search; Occupational Information Network (O*NET); Occupational Status; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the second chapter, I present a multidimensional skills search model which accounts for changes in occupational wages, occupational employment shares, and the wage distribution at large.
Bibliography Citation
Kantenga, Kory. Essays on Wage Inequality Using the Search Framework. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, 2018.
4. McDaniel, Heather Lasky
Advancing Understanding of Dynamic Mechanisms in Onset to Event Models: Discrete Time Survival Mediation with a Time Variant Mediator
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Experimental Psychology, 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Modeling; Modeling, MIxture Models/Finite Mixture Models; Monte Carlo

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Integrating discrete time survival and mediation analytic approaches, discrete-time survival mediation models (DTSM) help researchers elucidate the impact of predictors on the timing of event occurrence. Though application of this model has been gainful in various applied developmental and intervention research contexts, empirical work has yet to consider how DTSM models operate with a mediator that has a varying effect over time. The importance of examining this situation has important impacts for application of the model, given more complex statistical models are required, and subsequent interpretation of model parameters differ from the basic DTSM model. The overarching purpose of this dissertation was to understand how the addition of a mediator with a time variant effect impacts parameter estimation and fit of the DTSM model estimated in a mixture modeling framework. This investigation was done within the context of an applied example (Study One) to simultaneously inform applied considerations in timing to onset of youth alcohol use, as well as to evaluate statistical performance of the model in a related single-cell Monte Carlo study (Study Two) and an expanded simulation study (Study Three). Results are presented with discussion of future directions for this research and considerations for application of this modeling approach.
Bibliography Citation
McDaniel, Heather Lasky. Advancing Understanding of Dynamic Mechanisms in Onset to Event Models: Discrete Time Survival Mediation with a Time Variant Mediator. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Experimental Psychology, 2018.