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Source: Psychological Science
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Coyle, Thomas R.
Pillow, David R.
Snyder, Anissa
Kochunov, Peter
Processing Speed Mediates the Development of General Intelligence (g) in Adolescence
Psychological Science 22,10 (October 2011): 1265-1269.
Also: http://pss.sagepub.com/content/22/10/1265.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Cognitive Ability; g Factor; I.Q.; Intelligence; Modeling, Structural Equation; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Tests and Testing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the research reported here, we examined whether processing speed mediates the development of general intelligence (g) in adolescence. Using the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, a battery of 12 diverse cognitive tests, we assessed processing speed and g in a large sample of 13- to 17-year-olds obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 6,969). The direct effect of age on g was small compared with the total effect of age on g, which was almost fully mediated through speed. The results suggest that increases in g in adolescence can be attributed to increases in mental speed.
Bibliography Citation
Coyle, Thomas R., David R. Pillow, Anissa Snyder and Peter Kochunov. "Processing Speed Mediates the Development of General Intelligence (g) in Adolescence ." Psychological Science 22,10 (October 2011): 1265-1269.
2. Frey, Meredith C.
Detterman, Douglas K.
Scholastic Assessment or g? The relationship Between the Scholastic Assessment Test and General Cognitive Ability?
Psychological Science 15,6 (September 2004): 373-379.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=13125699&db=aph
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); g Factor; I.Q.; Intelligence; Intelligence Tests; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Tests and Testing

There is little evidence showing the relationship between the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and g (general intelligence). This research established the relationship between SAT and g, as well as the appropriateness of the SAT as a measure of g, and examined the SAT as a premorbid measure of intelligence. In Study 1, we used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Measures of g were extracted from the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery and correlated with SAT scores of 917 participants. The resulting correlation was .82 (.86 corrected for nonlinearity). Study 2 investigated the correlation between revised and recentered SAT scores and scores on the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices among 104 undergraduates. The resulting correlation was .483 (.72 corrected for restricted range). These studies indicate that the SAT is mainly a test of g. We provide equations for converting SAT scores to estimated IQs; such conversion could be useful for estimating premorbid IQ or conducting individual difference research with college students. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Frey, Meredith C. and Douglas K. Detterman. "Scholastic Assessment or g? The relationship Between the Scholastic Assessment Test and General Cognitive Ability?" Psychological Science 15,6 (September 2004): 373-379.
3. Myerson, Joel
Rank, Mark R.
Raines, Fredric Q.
Schnitzler, Mark A.
Race and General Cognitive Ability: The Myth of Diminishing Returns to Education
Psychological Science 9,2 (March 1998): 139-142.
Also: http://pss.sagepub.com/content/9/2/139.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; Educational Attainment; Educational Status; Ethnic Differences; Racial Differences

Assessed the impact of education on racial differences in general cognitive ability by using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. This study is a nationally representative survey of 12,686 males and females who were 14-21 yrs old as of January 1, 1979 when the study began. To control for attrition during the educational process, the scores of individuals who ultimately attained the same level of education but who were tested at different points in their educational careers were compared. Information from the 1989 round of interviews was used to determine Ss' educational attainment. One analysis was conducted on the data from individuals who graduated from high school but obtained no further schooling, and who had completed 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12 yrs of schooling at the time they were tested. A 2nd analysis examined the data from individuals who ultimately graduated from college but received no post graduate training, and who had completed between 8-16 yrs of education at the time of testing. Analyses revealed that education can have a strong positive effect on cognitive ability in both whites and blacks. Findings contradict the hypothesis that racial differences in intelligence are relatively imputable. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Myerson, Joel, Mark R. Rank, Fredric Q. Raines and Mark A. Schnitzler. "Race and General Cognitive Ability: The Myth of Diminishing Returns to Education." Psychological Science 9,2 (March 1998): 139-142.
4. Rowe, David C.
Vazsonyi, Alexander T.
Flannery, Daniel J.
Ethnic and Racial Similarity in Developmental Process: A Study of Academic Achievement
Psychological Science 6,1 (January 1995): 33-38.
Also: http://pss.sagepub.com/content/6/1/33.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Ethnic Studies; Family Environment; Hispanics; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); LISREL; Methods/Methodology; Modeling; Pairs (also see Siblings); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Racial Equality/Inequality; Racial Studies; Siblings

Correlation matrices were computed on academic achievement and family environment measures using longitudinal data on sibling pairs. Assessment instruments included the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment and an indirect measure based on sibling correlations for achievement. Data were from 1,130 children (mean age 9 years in 1988) of participants in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The 8 * 8 correlation matrices were computed on Hispanics, Blacks, and Whites separately. When compared employing a LISREL method, the matrices were equal across the ethnic-racial groups, suggesting that developmental processes influencing academic achievement may be similar in Hispanics, Blacks, and Whites. A structural equation model with 4 free parameters was fitted successfully to a correlation matrix pooled across groups. The existence of minority-specific developmental processes was not supported. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1995 American Psychological Association, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Rowe, David C., Alexander T. Vazsonyi and Daniel J. Flannery. "Ethnic and Racial Similarity in Developmental Process: A Study of Academic Achievement." Psychological Science 6,1 (January 1995): 33-38.