Search Results

Source: Race and Social Problems
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Addo, Fenaba
Houle, Jason N.
Simon, Daniel
Young, Black, and (Still) in the Red: Parental Wealth, Race, and Student Loan Debt
Race and Social Problems 8,1 (March 2016): 64-76.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12552-016-9162-0
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): College Cost; Debt/Borrowing; Family Resources; Financial Assistance; Net Worth; Parental Investments; Racial Differences; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Taking out student loans to assist with the costs of postsecondary schooling in the US has become the norm in recent decades. The debt burden young adults acquire during the higher education process, however, is increasingly stratified with black young adults holding greater debt burden than whites. Using data from the NLSY 1997 cohort, we examine racial differences in student loan debt acquisition and parental net wealth as a predictor contributing to this growing divide. We have four main results. First, confirming prior research, black young adults have substantially more debt than their white counterparts. Second, we find that this difference is partially explained by differences in wealth, family background, postsecondary educational differences, and family contributions to college. Third, young adults' net worth explain a portion of the black-white disparity in debt, suggesting that both differences in accumulation of debt and ability to repay debt in young adulthood explain racial disparities in debt. Fourth, the black-white disparity in debt is greatest at the highest levels of parents' net worth. Our findings show that while social and economic experiences can help explain racial disparities in debt, the situation is more precarious for black youth, who are not protected by their parents' wealth. This suggests that the increasing costs of higher education and corresponding rise in student loan debt are creating a new form of stratification for recent cohorts of young adults, and that student loan debt may be a new mechanism by which racial economic disparities are inherited across generations.
Bibliography Citation
Addo, Fenaba, Jason N. Houle and Daniel Simon. "Young, Black, and (Still) in the Red: Parental Wealth, Race, and Student Loan Debt." Race and Social Problems 8,1 (March 2016): 64-76.
2. Friedline, Terri
West, Stacia
Young Adults' Race, Wealth, and Entrepreneurship
Race and Social Problems 8,1 (March 2016): 42-63.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12552-016-9163-z
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Assets; Debt/Borrowing; Entrepreneurship; Ethnic Differences; Net Worth; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study explored relationships among young adults' wealth and entrepreneurial activities with emphasis on how these relationships differed among racial and ethnic groups. Using data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, results indicated that young adults' (N = 8984) higher accumulated amounts of wealth were associated with pursuing self-employment at higher rates; however, differences emerged when the associations were explored with various types of wealth and within racial and ethnic groups. Black young adults' greater debt and net worth were associated with their increased likelihoods of self-employment. Among Latino/a young adults, greater liquid assets and net worth were associated with increased likelihoods of self-employment. Wealth was unrelated to white young adults' self-employment. Wealth appeared to play an outsized role in the self-employment of black and Latino/a young adults compared to that of their white counterparts. In other words, racial and ethnic minority young adults may have a heavier burden for generating their own capital to embark on entrepreneurial activities when mainstream credit markets are unresponsive or inaccessible. Policy implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Friedline, Terri and Stacia West. "Young Adults' Race, Wealth, and Entrepreneurship." Race and Social Problems 8,1 (March 2016): 42-63.
3. Hannon, Lance
DeFina, Robert
Just Skin Deep? The Impact of Interviewer Race on the Assessment of African American Respondent Skin Tone
Race and Social Problems 6,4 (December 2014): 356-364.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12552-014-9128-z
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Discrimination; General Social Survey (GSS); Interviewer Characteristics; Racial Differences; Racial Equality/Inequality; Skin Tone

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Over the last decade, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has seen a significant increase in the number of discrimination claims based on skin shade. However, in some ways, substantiating colorism has proven to be more difficult than documenting racism, as skin tone data are rarely collected and few existing skin tone measures have been validated. The present study examines an increasingly popular skin tone scale that includes a professionally designed color guide to enhance rater consistency. Logistic regression analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and General Social Survey indicates that despite the addition of the color guide, the race of the interviewer matters for the assessment of respondent skin tone. On average, African American respondents with a white interviewer were about 3 times more likely to be classified as dark than those with an African American interviewer. We argue that failing to appropriately account for this race-of-interviewer effect can significantly impact colorism findings.
Bibliography Citation
Hannon, Lance and Robert DeFina. "Just Skin Deep? The Impact of Interviewer Race on the Assessment of African American Respondent Skin Tone." Race and Social Problems 6,4 (December 2014): 356-364.
4. Hannon, Lance
DeFina, Robert
Bruch, Sarah
The Relationship Between Skin Tone and School Suspension for African Americans
Race and Social Problems 5,4 (December 2013): 281-295.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12552-013-9104-z
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Discrimination; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); Racial Differences; School Suspension/Expulsion; Skin Tone

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study contributes to the research literature on colorism–discrimination based on skin tone—by examining whether skin darkness affects the likelihood that African Americans will experience school suspension. Using data from The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, logistic regression analyses indicated that darker skin tone significantly increased the odds of suspension for African American adolescents. Closer inspection of the data revealed that this overall result was disproportionately driven by the experiences of African American females. The odds of suspension were about 3 times greater for young African American women with the darkest skin tone compared to those with the lightest skin. This finding was robust to the inclusion of controls for parental SES, delinquent behavior, academic performance, and several other variables. Furthermore, this finding was replicated using similar measures in a different sample of African Americans from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. The results suggest that discrimination in school discipline goes beyond broad categories of race to include additional distinctions in skin tone.
Bibliography Citation
Hannon, Lance, Robert DeFina and Sarah Bruch. "The Relationship Between Skin Tone and School Suspension for African Americans." Race and Social Problems 5,4 (December 2013): 281-295.
5. Koch, David W.
Lee, Jaewon
Lee, Kyunghee
Coloring the War on Drugs: Arrest Disparities in Black, Brown, and White
Race and Social Problems 8,4 (December 2016): 313-325.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12552-016-9185-6
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Arrests; Drug Use; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) data, this study examines racial disparities in arrests for drug offending. Of the total 8984 NLSY97 participants, the study sample was restricted to the 4868 respondents who had ever reported using drugs (black = 1191, Hispanic = 980, white = 2697). The study questions are as follows: (1) Are there racial disparities in arrests for drug use, after controlling for incidence of drug use as well as other socio-demographic variables? (2) Are there racial disparities in arrests for drug dealing, after controlling for incidence of drug dealing as well as other socio-demographic variables? Compared with whites, blacks were more likely to be arrested for drug offending, even after controlling for incidence and other socio-demographic variables. Several socio-demographic variables, particularly gender, were also associated with arrests for drug offending. Bans on racial profiling and other legislative and policy changes are considered as potential strategies to ameliorate drug enforcement disparities.
Bibliography Citation
Koch, David W., Jaewon Lee and Kyunghee Lee. "Coloring the War on Drugs: Arrest Disparities in Black, Brown, and White." Race and Social Problems 8,4 (December 2016): 313-325.
6. Stansfield, Richard
A Multilevel Analysis of Hispanic Youth, Exposure to the United States, and Retail Theft
Race and Social Problems 4,2 (June 2012): 121-132.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/8118040418m42363/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Crime; Hispanic Youth; Home Environment; Immigrants; Modeling, Random Effects

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Panel data in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) provide an excellent opportunity to examine the relationship between Hispanic immigration, assimilation, and retail theft. This study examines the relationship between length of time Hispanic youth have spent in America, with the probability of stealing from a store. After controlling for traditional predictors of crime that are correlated with adolescence and immigrant status, random effects logistic regression models indicate that immigrants are less likely to steal than non-immigrants. However, calculating the marginal effects of time spent in the United States reveals that their probability increases with assimilation. Supplementary analyses specify that Hispanic youth who enter the United States within their first 5 years of age will have higher odds of engaging in retail theft. Supportive parenting and a structured home environment is a consistent protective factor in the models. Policies targeting pro-family and social identification are likely to benefit immigrant youth as they acculturate to America.
Bibliography Citation
Stansfield, Richard. "A Multilevel Analysis of Hispanic Youth, Exposure to the United States, and Retail Theft." Race and Social Problems 4,2 (June 2012): 121-132.
7. Zaw, Khaing
Hamilton, Darrick
Darity, William A. Jr.
Race, Wealth and Incarceration: Results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Race and Social Problems 8,1 (March 2016): 103-115.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12552-016-9164-y
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Incarceration/Jail; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Study of Youth to explore the interwoven links between race, wealth and incarceration, this study examines the data on race and wealth status before and after incarceration. Data indicate that although higher levels of wealth were associated with lower rates of incarceration, the likelihood of future incarceration still was higher for blacks at every level of wealth compared to the white likelihood, as well as the Hispanic likelihood, which fell below the white likelihood for some levels of wealth. Further, we find that racial wealth gaps existed among those who would be incarcerated in the future and also among the previously incarcerated.
Bibliography Citation
Zaw, Khaing, Darrick Hamilton and William A. Jr. Darity. "Race, Wealth and Incarceration: Results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Race and Social Problems 8,1 (March 2016): 103-115.