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Source: Sage Publications
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Bengtson, Vern L.
Acock, Alan C.
Allen, Katherine R.
Dilworth-Anderson, Peggye
Klein, David M.
Sourcebook of Family Theory and Methods
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2005
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Missing Data/Imputation; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[A detailed Table of Contents and supplemental reading to this monograph can be found at: http://www.ncfr.org/sourcebook/content.htm]
Bibliography Citation
Bengtson, Vern L., Alan C. Acock, Katherine R. Allen, Peggye Dilworth-Anderson and David M. Klein. Sourcebook of Family Theory and Methods. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2005.
2. Bowles, Samuel
Gintis, Herbert
Osborne Groves, Melissa
Unequal Chances: Family Background and Economic Success
New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation and Princeton University Press, 2005
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Data Analysis; Earnings; Fathers and Sons; Human Capital; I.Q.; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Economic; Pairs (also see Siblings); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Contents:
Chapter 1: The apple does not fall far from the tree / Greg Duncan ... [et al.]
Chapter 2: The apple falls even closer to the tree than we thought : new and revised estimates of the intergenerational inheritance of earnings / Bhashkar Mazunder
Chapter 3: The changing effect of family background on the incomes of American adults / David J. Harding ... [et al.]
Chapter 4: Influences of nature and nurture on earnings variation : a report on a study of various sibling types in Sweden / Anders Björklund, Markus Jäntti, Gary Solon
Chapter 5: Rags, riches, and race : the intergenerational economic mobility of black and white families in the United States / Tom Hertz
Chapter 6: Resemblance in personality and attitudes between parents and their children : genetic and environmental contributions / John C. Loehlin
Chapter 7: Personality and the intergenerational transmission of economic status / Melissa Osborne Groves
Chapter 8: Son preference, marriage, and intergenerational transfer in rural China / Marcus W. Feldman ... [et al.]
Chapter 9: Justice, luck, and the family : the intergenerational transmission of economic advantage from a normative perspective / Adam Swift.

Chapter 7 … provides a micro data analysis of the role of personality in the intergenerational transmission of earnings. The author uses data on matched father-son pairs from the mature and young male cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys. The statistical models link son's and father's permanent income, while also controlling for human capital variables, IQ, and the Rotter score, a commonly used indicator of personality. The results show that a substantial share of the intergenerational transmission of earnings is attributable to the transmission of personality traits: 11 percent of the father-son correlation in earnings is explained by the transmission of personality.

Bibliography Citation
Bowles, Samuel, Herbert Gintis and Melissa Osborne Groves. Unequal Chances: Family Background and Economic Success. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation and Princeton University Press, 2005.
3. Corwyn, Robert Flynn
Bradley, Robert H.
Socioeconomic Status and Child Externalizing Behaviors: A Structural Equation Framework
In: Sourcebook of Family Theory and Methods. V. L. Bengtson, A.C. Acock, K.R. Allen, P. Dilworth-Anderson, and D.M. Klein, eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2005: pp. 469-492
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Missing Data/Imputation; Modeling; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[The following information is from: http://www.ncfr.org/sourcebook/content.htm]
Chapter 19 -- Socioeconomic Status and Childhood Externalizing Behaviors: A Structural Equation Modeling Framework. (Robert Corwyn & Robert Bradley).

1. Multi-site, mixed methods study of rural, low income families (Bonnie Braun & Elaine Anderson).
2. Promoting positive youth development across variations in socioeconomic status and poverty: Framing Corwyn and Bradley structural equation modeling approach within a developmental systems perspective (Christina Theokas & Richard M. Lerner). Click Additional Readings. Click PowerPoint Figure.

Bibliography Citation
Corwyn, Robert Flynn and Robert H. Bradley. "Socioeconomic Status and Child Externalizing Behaviors: A Structural Equation Framework" In: Sourcebook of Family Theory and Methods. V. L. Bengtson, A.C. Acock, K.R. Allen, P. Dilworth-Anderson, and D.M. Klein, eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2005: pp. 469-492
4. Guo, Guang
Hipp, John
Longitudinal Analysis for Continuous Outcomes: Random Effects Models and Latent Trajectory Models
In: Handbook on Data Analysis. M. Hardy and A. Bryman, eds., London: Sage Publications, 2004
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Children, Academic Development; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This chapter describes and compares two approaches to modeling longitudinal data: the random effects growth curve model and the latent trajectory model. Our primary purpose is didactic, as we show how to construct these models through a detailed example with NLSY data. and include computer program syntax in the Appendix. We also show that while these two approaches begin from very different assumptions, in the case of continuous longitudinal data they provide identical parameter estimates and very similar standard errors. Employing an example with NLSY data, we show how these two approaches can model the within-case error structure in various fashions. We also illustrate how each of these approaches can handle predictors that are either time-invariant, or predictors that change over time, and that handling missing data on the dependent variable is straightforward. The similar results from each approach suggest that the researcher can obtain reliable parameter estimates from the method which he or she is most familiar with. However, we conclude by pointing out that the latent trajectory model has an additional advantage of allowing the researcher to assess the overall fit of the model, something that isn't currently feasible using a random effects growth curve strategy.
Bibliography Citation
Guo, Guang and John Hipp. "Longitudinal Analysis for Continuous Outcomes: Random Effects Models and Latent Trajectory Models" In: Handbook on Data Analysis. M. Hardy and A. Bryman, eds., London: Sage Publications, 2004
5. Hao, Lingxin
Using a Multinomial Logit Specification to Model Two Interdependent Processes with an Empirical Application
Sociological Methods & Research 26,1 (August 1997): 80-117.
Also: http://smr.sagepub.com/content/26/1/80.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Endogeneity; Fertility; Methods/Methodology; Modeling; Modeling, Logit

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Theories in sociology and other social sciences often postulate causal relationships. Yamaguchi advanced a model for the interdependence of two discrete-time, discrete-state endogenous processes. The Yamaguchi model is introduced with a discussion of its advantages over conventional methods and a comparison with recently developed relevant models. To overcome the obstacle that existing statisitcal software cannot directly estimate the Yamaguchi model, the author has developed a method that converts estimated parameters from standard multinomial logit estimation into parameters of the Yamaguchi model using standard statistical software and a simple programming of linear transformation. The method is simple and straightforward and thus merits application to an analysis of interdependence with panel data. This article also provides a detailed empirical example to illustrate an application of the method.
Bibliography Citation
Hao, Lingxin. "Using a Multinomial Logit Specification to Model Two Interdependent Processes with an Empirical Application." Sociological Methods & Research 26,1 (August 1997): 80-117.
6. Morgan, Leslie A.
After Marriage Ends: Economic Consequences for Midlife Women
Belmont, CA: Sage Publications, 1991
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Divorce; Income; Labor Force Participation; Marital Disruption; Marital Dissolution; Widows

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This book examines the economic transitions of mid-life women as they experience the end of marriage from separation, divorce, or widowhood. Research has typically focused on either younger women as they experienced separation/divorce or older women as they were widowed, leaving aside the issue of whether there are similarities in these outcomes. Using data drawn from the NLS of Mature Women, this study follows hundreds of women through marital transitions and examines the loss of income, changes in employment patterns, and subsequent remarriage following widowhood, separation, or divorce. There are two unique contributions of the analysis: 1) it permits direct comparison of the different marital status groups, without the difficulties imposed by serious age differences or different study designs, samples or questions; and 2) the length of time that is studied. Much of the prior research has looked only at one time period following the ending of marriage. This analysis uses repeated measurements after marriages end compared with baseline years during the marriage to establish true changes in the circumstances of mid-life women and their families. Results suggest that there are indeed parallels in the experiences of widowed and divorced women in terms of the outcomes they face after their marriages end. Incomes and their adequacy to needs both decrease substantially, with corresponding rises in poverty. Return to work and remarriage are also discussed in terms of these events. Policy issues and underlying causes in the gender/family role system point to possible avenues for preventing economic distress after marriage ends.
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, Leslie A. After Marriage Ends: Economic Consequences for Midlife Women. Belmont, CA: Sage Publications, 1991.
7. Parnes, Herbert S.
The National Longitudinal Surveys: An Interim Assessment
In: Manpower Research and Labor Economics. G. Swanson and J. Michaelson, eds. New York, NY: Sage Publications, 1979
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Longitudinal Surveys; Manpower Research; Mobility, Job; NLS Description; Research Methodology; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Unemployment; Work Attitudes; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The presentation is divided into five sections. The first contains a brief description of the origins of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS). The second describes the study as it has evolved over the years since 1965, including a discussion of the design of the four original samples, the nature and timing of the periodic interviews, and the types of data that have been collected. The third section relates to the administration of the study, with particular reference to the allocation of responsibility for its design and execution. In the fourth, the actual and potential "products" of the project are described in terms of (1) the variety of studies, completed or in progress, that are based upon the NLS data, (2) illustrative research findings, and (3) suggestions for additional types of research for which the data are appropriate. The fifth section draws some lessons from the experience gained in administering this type of longitudinal research.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S. "The National Longitudinal Surveys: An Interim Assessment" In: Manpower Research and Labor Economics. G. Swanson and J. Michaelson, eds. New York, NY: Sage Publications, 1979
8. Rosenfeld, Rachel A.
Race and Sex Differences in Career Dynamics
In: Feminist Foundations: Toward Transforming Sociology, Gender and Society Readers Series, Volume 3. K. Myers, et al., eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Inc., 1998
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Educational Attainment; Employment, History; Family Background; Gender Differences; Human Capital; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Training; Wage Levels

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This reprinted article originally appeared in (American Sociological Review 45 (August 1980). An earlier version of this paper was presented at Boston MA: Annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, August 1979. Chapter: Analyzed career differences by race and sex by examining various aspects of career inequality: initial status and wage level; potential status and wage levels; effects of human capital, family background, and family of procreation variables on initial and potential wage and status levels; speed of advancement. Pooling of cross-sections and time-series techniques are used to estimate the model, with data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of the Labor Market Experience of Young Men (1966-1973) and Women (1968-1975). Employment and educational histories were collected for 14-24 yr. olds at the time of the 1st survey for each group. Results how a general advantage of white men in many aspects of careers, including wage levels and returns to human capital. Differences where shown in effects of education and training, marital status, and parental socioeconomic status early in the career vs at the career stage when change has ceased to occur. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Rosenfeld, Rachel A. "Race and Sex Differences in Career Dynamics" In: Feminist Foundations: Toward Transforming Sociology, Gender and Society Readers Series, Volume 3. K. Myers, et al., eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Inc., 1998