Search Results

Source: Social Science Quarterly
Resulting in 43 citations.
1. Alon, Sigal
Tienda, Marta
Job Mobility and Early Career Wage Growth of White, African-American, and Hispanic Women
Social Science Quarterly 86, Supplement s1 (December 2005): 1196-1217.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.0038-4941.2005.00342.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Education; Ethnic Differences; Hispanics; Job Turnover; Mobility, Occupational; Racial Differences; Wage Gap; Wage Growth; Wages, Women; Work History

Objective. This article examines whether and how young women's job mobility influences racial and ethnic wage-growth differentials during the first eight years after leaving school. Methods. We use the NLSY-79 Work History File to simulate the influence of job mobility on the wages of skilled and unskilled workers. Results. African-American and Hispanic women average less job mobility than white women, especially if they did not attend college. Unskilled women who experience frequent job changes during the first four postschool years reap positive wage returns, but turnover beyond the shopping period incurs wage penalties. Job mobility does not appear to boost wage growth for college-educated women. Conclusions. Among unskilled women, race and ethnic wage disparities partly derive from group differences in the frequency of job changes, but unequal returns to job mobility drive the wage gaps for skilled women. We discuss several explanations for these disparities. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Alon, Sigal and Marta Tienda. "Job Mobility and Early Career Wage Growth of White, African-American, and Hispanic Women." Social Science Quarterly 86, Supplement s1 (December 2005): 1196-1217.
2. Angle, John
Wissmann, David A.
Work Experience, Age, and Gender Discrimination
Social Science Quarterly 64,1 (March 1983): 60-75
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Sex; Job Tenure; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Angle, John and David A. Wissmann. "Work Experience, Age, and Gender Discrimination." Social Science Quarterly 64,1 (March 1983): 60-75.
3. Baum, Charles L., II
Ford, William F.
Hopper, Jeffrey D.
The Obese Smoker's Wage Penalty
Social Science Quarterly 87,4 (December 2006): 863-881.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-6237.2006.00440.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Discrimination; Discrimination, Employer; Gender Differences; Obesity; Wage Effects; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Smoking and obesity are associated with significant wage penalties when considered separately. We assess the combined effects of those behaviors. Methods. We estimate the effects of smoking and obesity on wages using multivariate regression analysis with 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data. Results. The raw data indicate that obese smokers experience large earnings penalties. However, these penalties are not found to be interactive or directly causal for most of the demographic subgroups we examine. One exception is the wage penalty associated with obesity for females, which remains significant throughout the analysis. Conclusions. In the absence of a demonstrable direct causal effect of those behaviors on wages, associated individual-specific socioeconomic factors appear to be the driving forces behind the obese smoker wage penalty. Not included, but potentially significant, are the effects of employer and customer discrimination against obese smokers and the possible labor policy implications of such discrimination.

Copyright of Social Science Quarterly (Blackwell Publishing Limited) is the property of Blackwell Publishing Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Baum, Charles L., II, William F. Ford and Jeffrey D. Hopper. "The Obese Smoker's Wage Penalty ." Social Science Quarterly 87,4 (December 2006): 863-881.
4. Brown, Christian
Returns to Postincarceration Education for Former Prisoners
Social Science Quarterly 96,1 (March 2015): 161-175.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ssqu.12094/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development; Incarceration/Jail; Labor Market Outcomes; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: I estimate the returns to education for individuals who attain education after an incarceration spell.

Methods: Returns to labor supply and wages are estimated using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and a variety of regression and matching techniques.

Results: A positive relationship is found between postincarceration education and labor outcomes, especially for college completion. The General Equivalency Diploma (GED) is not associated with direct benefits.

Conclusions: The returns to post-incarceration education are positive but diminished, implying that programs targeted at college completion may best serve prisoners after release.

Bibliography Citation
Brown, Christian. "Returns to Postincarceration Education for Former Prisoners." Social Science Quarterly 96,1 (March 2015): 161-175.
5. Cohen, Jere
Warner, Rebecca L.
Segal, David R.
Military Service and Educational Attainment in the All-Volunteer Force
Social Science Quarterly 76,1 (March 1995): 88-104
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Military Service; Veterans

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Cohen, Jere, Rebecca L. Warner and David R. Segal. "Military Service and Educational Attainment in the All-Volunteer Force." Social Science Quarterly 76,1 (March 1995): 88-104.
6. Coverdill, James E.
Kraft, Joan Marie
Enrollment, Employment, and the Risk and Resolution of a First Premarital Pregnancy
Social Science Quarterly 77,1 (March 1996): 43-59
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Abortion; Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Childbearing, Adolescent; Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Cohabitation; Educational Status; Employment; Event History; Fertility; Hispanics; Marital Status; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Racial Differences; Wage Differentials; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Coverdill, James E. and Joan Marie Kraft. "Enrollment, Employment, and the Risk and Resolution of a First Premarital Pregnancy." Social Science Quarterly 77,1 (March 1996): 43-59.
7. Cowan, Benjamin W.
Sources of Bias in Teenagers' College Expectations
Social Science Quarterly 99,1 (March 2018): 136-153.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ssqu.12354/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); College Enrollment; Educational Outcomes; Expectations/Intentions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper compares individuals' college expectations as teenagers with their subsequent college outcomes using data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97). I analyze how a rich set of youth characteristics correlate with the discrepancy between expectations and realizations.
Bibliography Citation
Cowan, Benjamin W. "Sources of Bias in Teenagers' College Expectations." Social Science Quarterly 99,1 (March 2018): 136-153.
8. Edwards, Mark Evan
Plotnick, Robert D.
Klawitter, Marieka Marjorie
Do Attitudes and Personality Characteristics Affect Socioeconomic Outcomes? The Case of Welfare Use by Young Women
Social Science Quarterly 82,4 (December 2001): 827-843.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/0038-4941.00062/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Attitudes; Family Background; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Modeling, Logit; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Self-Esteem; Social Environment; Welfare

Objective. We estimate a model of social-psychological determinants of entry into Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), the primary cash welfare program in the United States until 1996. Methods. Using information from the youngest cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we estimate logit models of the probability of ever participating in AFDC and hazard models of the timing until first use of AFDC. Results. We find strong associations between welfare use and several attitudes and personality characteristics, but with two exceptions, most of the associations are not robust to the inclusion of exogenous: background characteristics. There is consistent, strong evidence that positive attitudes toward school lower the likelihood of using welfare and increase duration until first receipt. Family background and social environment characteristics show strong robust effects. Conclusions. Our results point to relatively weak evidence for the hypothesis that individual attitudes in adolescence have a significant impact on initial welfare receipt.
Bibliography Citation
Edwards, Mark Evan, Robert D. Plotnick and Marieka Marjorie Klawitter. "Do Attitudes and Personality Characteristics Affect Socioeconomic Outcomes? The Case of Welfare Use by Young Women." Social Science Quarterly 82,4 (December 2001): 827-843.
9. Fredland, John Eric
Little, Roger D.
Socioeconomic Status of World War II Veterans by Race: An Empirical Test of the Bridging Hypothesis
Social Science Quarterly 66,3 (September 1980): 534-551
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Military Personnel; Military Service; Military Training; Racial Differences; Veterans

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Fredland, John Eric and Roger D. Little. "Socioeconomic Status of World War II Veterans by Race: An Empirical Test of the Bridging Hypothesis." Social Science Quarterly 66,3 (September 1980): 534-551.
10. Gill, H. Leroy
Haurin, Donald R.
Phillips, Jeff
Mobility and Fertility in the Military
Social Science Quarterly 75,2 (June 1994): 340-353
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Earnings, Wives; Fertility; Marital Stability; Military Service; Mobility; Regions; Religion; Wages, Women; Wives, Attitudes

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Gill, H. Leroy, Donald R. Haurin and Jeff Phillips. "Mobility and Fertility in the Military." Social Science Quarterly 75,2 (June 1994): 340-353.
11. Hamil-Luker, Jenifer
Women's Wages: Cohort Differences in Returns to Education and Training over Time
Social Science Quarterly 86,5 (December 2005): 1261-1278.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.0038-4941.2005.00345.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Education; High School Dropouts; Human Capital; Skill Depreciation; Skills; Training, Employee; Training, Occupational; Training, On-the-Job; Wage Growth; Wages, Young Women

Objective. This article examines the effects of education and work-related training on wage-growth trajectories for two cohorts of women as they aged from their early 20s and 30s into their early 30s and 40s. I test whether occupational training compensates for an earlier lack of education, thereby decreasing earnings inequality over time within cohorts. Because the broader economic context may influence the relationship between wages, education, and training, I test the assumption that the experiences of a given cohort may be generalized to others. Methods. Following NLS Young Women between 1977 and 1987 and NLSY79 Women between 1988 and 1998, growth-curve analyses test whether returns to investments in human capital vary over time, across and within cohorts. Results. Women who did not update their skills over time experienced stagnation or declines in real wages, leading to growing wage inequality within education levels. However, women without a high school degree who engaged in on-the-job training experienced the greatest returns to training, thus reducing the initial education-based wage gap. Conclusion. Education and training in adulthood can deflect the accumulation of disadvantage, but can also solidify an already uneven distribution of resources across social strata. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Hamil-Luker, Jenifer. "Women's Wages: Cohort Differences in Returns to Education and Training over Time." Social Science Quarterly 86,5 (December 2005): 1261-1278.
12. Harris, Kathleen Mullan
Raley, R. Kelly
Rindfuss, Ronald R.
Family Configurations and Child-Care Patterns: Families with Two or More Preschool-Age Children
Social Science Quarterly 83, 2 (June 2002): 455-471.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1540-6237.00094/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Births, Repeat / Spacing; Child Care; Children, Preschool; Family Characteristics; Family Size; Family Structure; Fertility; Household Composition; Household Structure; Life Course; Maternal Employment; Preschool Children; Social Roles; Women's Roles; Work Hours

Objectives. This article examines the extent to which mothers must find child-care arrangements for more than one preschool child, and when they do, the strategies they adopt to juggle their work and family roles. Methods. We use national data from numerous studies with information on fertility and child care among employed mothers with children. Results. We find that it is a common life-course experience for mother to need child care for two or more preschool-age children. Employed mothers' preferred strategy for child care for their multiple preschool-age children is to place all preschoolers in the same type of arrangement, choosing parental care more often and center care less often than employed mothers with one preschooler. Conclusions. Previous child-care research has ignored the complexities parents face when they must make child-care decisions about all their preschool-age children simultaneously. Child-Care decisions need to be studied within the family and household context.
Bibliography Citation
Harris, Kathleen Mullan, R. Kelly Raley and Ronald R. Rindfuss. "Family Configurations and Child-Care Patterns: Families with Two or More Preschool-Age Children." Social Science Quarterly 83, 2 (June 2002): 455-471.
13. Hayward, Mark D.
Hardy, Melissa A.
Grady, William R.
Labor Force Withdrawal Patterns Among Older Men in the United States
Social Science Quarterly 70,2 (June 1989): 425-448
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Disabled Workers; Mortality; Occupations; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Hayward, Mark D., Melissa A. Hardy and William R. Grady. "Labor Force Withdrawal Patterns Among Older Men in the United States." Social Science Quarterly 70,2 (June 1989): 425-448.
14. Jacobs, Jerry A.
Sex Typing of Aspirations and Occupations: Instability during the Careers of Young Women
Social Science Quarterly 68,1 (March 1987): 122-137
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Occupational Aspirations; Occupational Segregation; Occupations, Female

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Jacobs, Jerry A. "Sex Typing of Aspirations and Occupations: Instability during the Careers of Young Women." Social Science Quarterly 68,1 (March 1987): 122-137.
15. Jud, G. Donald
Walker, James L.
Class and Race Discrimination: Estimates Based upon a Sample of Young Men
Social Science Quarterly 57,4 (March 1977): 731-749
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Employment; I.Q.; Job Training; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Jud, G. Donald and James L. Walker. "Class and Race Discrimination: Estimates Based upon a Sample of Young Men." Social Science Quarterly 57,4 (March 1977): 731-749.
16. Koball, Heather
Living Arrangements and School Dropout among Minor Mothers Following Welfare Reform
Social Science Quarterly 88,5 (December 2007): 1374-1391.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-6237.2007.00507.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Coresidence; High School Dropouts; Mothers, Adolescent; National Education Longitudinal Survey (NELS); Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Welfare

Objectives. The 1996 welfare reform laws required that parents under the age of 18 live with their parents or an adult relative and enroll in school to be eligible for welfare benefits. This study examines whether minor mothers were less likely to drop out of school and more likely to live with parents following welfare reform. Methods. Data from the National Education Longitudinal Survey 1988 and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 were used in difference-in-difference analyses. Results. Following welfare reform, minor mothers' co-residence with parents increased and their drop-out rates decreased. Conclusions. Welfare reform requirements are associated with changes in living arrangements and drop-out rates of minor mothers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Social Science Quarterly (Blackwell Publishing Limited) is the property of Blackwell Publishing Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Koball, Heather. "Living Arrangements and School Dropout among Minor Mothers Following Welfare Reform." Social Science Quarterly 88,5 (December 2007): 1374-1391.
17. Leigh, J. Paul
Gill, Andrew Matthew
Do Women Receive Compensating Wages for Risks of Dying on the Job?
Social Science Quarterly 72,4 (December 1991): 727-737
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Job Hazards; Unions; Wages, Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Leigh, J. Paul and Andrew Matthew Gill. "Do Women Receive Compensating Wages for Risks of Dying on the Job?" Social Science Quarterly 72,4 (December 1991): 727-737.
18. Lichter, Daniel T.
The Migration of Dual-Worker Families: Does the Wife's Job Matter?
Social Science Quarterly 63,1 (March 1982): 48-57
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Dual-Career Families; Earnings; Family Resources; Migration; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Wives

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Lichter, Daniel T. "The Migration of Dual-Worker Families: Does the Wife's Job Matter?" Social Science Quarterly 63,1 (March 1982): 48-57.
19. Liu, Ruth X.
Chen, Zeng-Lin
The Effects of Marital Conflict and Marital Disruption on Depressive Affect: A Comparison Between Women In and Out of Poverty
Social Science Quarterly 87,2 (June 2006): 250-271.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-6237.2006.00379.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Marital Conflict; Marital Disruption; Marriage; Psychological Effects; Wealth; Women

Objectives. We examine the independent and interactive effects of marital conflict and marital disruption on women's depressive affect and how these effects vary by family's poverty status. Methods. We use the OLS regression and data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to test the hypothesized relationships. Results. The results showed that marital conflict and marital disruption each predicts subsequent depression after controlling for the initial level of depression and other antecedent variables. The effect of marital conflict on depression is stronger among women in poverty than those out of poverty. Furthermore, among women in poverty, marital conflict followed by marital breakup is related to a heightened level of depression, whereas among women financially better off, there is a reduction in the level of depressive affect. Conclusions. These findings point to the importance of a family's economic condition and its impact on the interrelationships among marital processes and women's psychological health.
Bibliography Citation
Liu, Ruth X. and Zeng-Lin Chen. "The Effects of Marital Conflict and Marital Disruption on Depressive Affect: A Comparison Between Women In and Out of Poverty." Social Science Quarterly 87,2 (June 2006): 250-271.
20. Loh, Eng Seng
Changes in Family Structure, Attained Schooling, and Adult Poverty Status
Social Science Quarterly 77,1 (March 1996): 145-158
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Divorce; Educational Attainment; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Structure; Fathers, Leaving; Gender Differences; Marital Disruption; Marital Status; Marriage; Parents, Single; Poverty; Schooling

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Loh, Eng Seng. "Changes in Family Structure, Attained Schooling, and Adult Poverty Status." Social Science Quarterly 77,1 (March 1996): 145-158.
21. Loh, Eng Seng
Economic Effects of Physical Appearance
Social Science Quarterly 74,2 (June 1993): 420-438
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Sex; Family Background; Height, Height-Weight Ratios; Obesity; Schooling; Wage Effects; Wage Growth

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Loh, Eng Seng. "Economic Effects of Physical Appearance." Social Science Quarterly 74,2 (June 1993): 420-438.
22. London, Rebecca A.
Welfare Recipients' College Attendance and Consequences for Time-Limited Aid
Social Science Quarterly 86, Supplement s1 (December 2005):1104-1122.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.0038-4941.2005.00338.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): College Education; College Graduates; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare

Objective. I examine the association between total time on welfare and recipients' college attendance and graduation over a 20-year period. Methods. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I model the determinants of college enrollment and graduation among welfare recipients, and the association between the total number of months a recipient receives aid and her college attendance and graduation. Models examine separately the effects associated with longer stays on aid while recipients attend school as well as reduced recidivism associated with college attendance and graduation. Results. Findings indicate that attending college is associated with more months on aid, but graduating largely offsets this increase through reductions in return to aid. Conclusions. Policymakers' concerns that including postsecondary education as a TANF activity would undermine the short-term focus of the program are not fully supported. A greater concern is the low rate of graduation among welfare recipients, who reap the most benefits from college attendance and sacrifice the fewest months on aid. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
London, Rebecca A. "Welfare Recipients' College Attendance and Consequences for Time-Limited Aid." Social Science Quarterly 86, Supplement s1 (December 2005):1104-1122.
23. Lyon, Larry
Rector-Owen, Holley
Labor Market Mobility Among Young Black and White Women: Longitudinal Models of Occupational Prestige and Income
Social Science Quarterly 62,1 (March 1981): 64-78
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Occupational Status; Schooling; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Lyon, Larry and Holley Rector-Owen. "Labor Market Mobility Among Young Black and White Women: Longitudinal Models of Occupational Prestige and Income." Social Science Quarterly 62,1 (March 1981): 64-78.
24. Madigan, Thomas J.
Hogan, Dennis P.
Kin Access and Residential Mobility Among Young Mothers
Social Science Quarterly 72,3 (September 1991): 615-622
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Childbearing; First Birth; Mobility; Residence; Support Networks; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Madigan, Thomas J. and Dennis P. Hogan. "Kin Access and Residential Mobility Among Young Mothers." Social Science Quarterly 72,3 (September 1991): 615-622.
25. Manlove, Jennifer S.
Wildsmith, Elizabeth
Welti, Kate
Scott, Mindy E.
Ikramullah, Erum N.
Relationship Characteristics and the Relationship Context of Nonmarital First Births Among Young Adult Women
Social Science Quarterly 93,2 (June 2012): 506-520.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-6237.2012.00853.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Cohabitation; Ethnic Differences; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine whether and how characteristics of the relationship dyad are linked to nonmarital childbearing among young adult women, additionally distinguishing between cohabiting and nonunion births.

Methods: We used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort and discrete time-event history methods to examine these objectives.

Results: Our analyses found that similarities and differences between women and their most recent sexual partner in educational attainment, disengagement from work or school, race/ethnicity, and age were linked to the risk and context of nonmarital childbearing. For example, partner disengagement (from school and work) was associated with increased odds of a nonmarital birth regardless of whether the woman herself was disengaged. Additionally, having a partner of a different race/ethnicity was associated with nonmarital childbearing for whites, but not for blacks and Hispanics.

Conclusions: We conclude that relationship characteristics are an important dimension of the lives of young adults that influence their odds of having a birth outside of marriage.

Bibliography Citation
Manlove, Jennifer S., Elizabeth Wildsmith, Kate Welti, Mindy E. Scott and Erum N. Ikramullah. "Relationship Characteristics and the Relationship Context of Nonmarital First Births Among Young Adult Women." Social Science Quarterly 93,2 (June 2012): 506-520.
26. Maxwell, Nan L.
Economic Returns to Migration: Marital Status and Gender Differences
Social Science Quarterly 68,1 (March 1988): 108-121
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Earnings; Family Influences; Marital Status; Migration

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "Economic Returns to Migration: Marital Status and Gender Differences." Social Science Quarterly 68,1 (March 1988): 108-121.
27. Maxwell, Nan L.
The Effect of Human Capital and Labor Market Segments on Retirement Income: A Policy Analysis
Social Science Quarterly 67,1 (March 1986): 53-68
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Dual Economic Theory; Human Capital Theory; Income; Pensions; Retirement; Social Security; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "The Effect of Human Capital and Labor Market Segments on Retirement Income: A Policy Analysis." Social Science Quarterly 67,1 (March 1986): 53-68.
28. Maxwell, Nan L.
The Retirement Experience: Psychological and Financial Linkages to the Labor Market
Social Science Quarterly 66,1 (March 1985): 22-33.
Also: http://law.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/faculty-personal-sites/joni--hersch/publications/download.aspx?id=856
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Health Factors; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Retirement; Well-Being; Work Attitudes

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "The Retirement Experience: Psychological and Financial Linkages to the Labor Market." Social Science Quarterly 66,1 (March 1985): 22-33.
29. Ortiz, Vilma
Fennelly, Katherine D.
Early Childbearing and Employment Among Young Mexican, Black and White Women
Social Science Quarterly 69,4 (December 1988): 987-995
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Childbearing, Adolescent; First Birth; Hispanics; Labor Force Participation; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Ortiz, Vilma and Katherine D. Fennelly. "Early Childbearing and Employment Among Young Mexican, Black and White Women." Social Science Quarterly 69,4 (December 1988): 987-995.
30. Ortiz, Vilma
Santana Cooney, Rosemary
Sex-Role Attitudes and Labor Force Participation among Young Hispanic Females and Non-Hispanic White Females
Social Science Quarterly 65,2 (June 1984): 392-400
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Hispanics; Labor Force Participation; Sex Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Ortiz, Vilma and Rosemary Santana Cooney. "Sex-Role Attitudes and Labor Force Participation among Young Hispanic Females and Non-Hispanic White Females." Social Science Quarterly 65,2 (June 1984): 392-400.
31. Pagan, Jose A.
Davila, Alberto
Obesity, Occupational Attainment, and Earnings
Social Science Quarterly 78,3 (September 1997): 756-770
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Benefits; Benefits, Fringe; Discrimination; Discrimination, Employer; Discrimination, Sex; Economics of Discrimination; Economics of Gender; Economics of Minorities; Obesity; Wage Differentials; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Pagan, Jose A. and Alberto Davila. "Obesity, Occupational Attainment, and Earnings." Social Science Quarterly 78,3 (September 1997): 756-770.
32. Register, Charles A.
Williams, Donald R.
Wage Effects of Obesity among Young Workers
Social Science Quarterly 71,1 (March 1990): 130-141
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Obesity; Wage Effects; Wages, Youth

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Register, Charles A. and Donald R. Williams. "Wage Effects of Obesity among Young Workers." Social Science Quarterly 71,1 (March 1990): 130-141.
33. Rumberger, Russell W.
Incidence and Wage Effects of Occupational Training Among Young Men
Social Science Quarterly 65,3 (September 1984): 775-788
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Job Skills; Schooling; Training, Occupational; Vocational Education; Wage Effects; Wages, Young Men; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Rumberger, Russell W. "Incidence and Wage Effects of Occupational Training Among Young Men." Social Science Quarterly 65,3 (September 1984): 775-788.
34. Schiller, Bradley R.
Moving Up: The Training and Wage Gains of Minimum-Wage Entrants
Social Science Quarterly 75,3 (September 1994): 622-636
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Employment, Youth; Minimum Wage; Wage Growth

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Schiller, Bradley R. "Moving Up: The Training and Wage Gains of Minimum-Wage Entrants." Social Science Quarterly 75,3 (September 1994): 622-636.
35. Schiller, Bradley R.
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Long-Term Trends in Relative Earnings Mobility
Social Science Quarterly 94,4 (December 2013): 881-893.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ssqu.12008/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Earnings; Mobility

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: The extent of individual mobility across hierarchical ranks of the income distribution is a critical factor in interpreting the sociopolitical significance of well-documented increases in cross-sectional inequality. The objective of this study is to replicate two earlier investigations of mobility, allowing one to discern trends in mobility rates and patterns.

Methods: Mobility was measured using data from NLSY79 (where NLSY is National Longitudinal Survey of Youth) for the years 1989–2004.

Results: Results show that hierarchical (relative) mobility has remained substantial and pervasive from the 1970s through the 1990s for male workers, with no evidence of any attenuation. In view of the increased distance between (absolute) income ranks, this observation is both surprising and reassuring.

Conclusion: Despite substantial increase in cross-sectional inequality, long-term mobility rates have not changed since the 1960s.

Bibliography Citation
Schiller, Bradley R. and Sankar Mukhopadhyay. "Long-Term Trends in Relative Earnings Mobility." Social Science Quarterly 94,4 (December 2013): 881-893.
36. Spitze, Glenna D.
The Effect of Family Migration on Wives' Employment: How Long Does it Last
Social Science Quarterly 65,1 (March 1984): 21-36.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=EJ298694&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=EJ298694
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Earnings; Employment; Job Status; Marriage; Migration; Wives, Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Spitze, Glenna D. "The Effect of Family Migration on Wives' Employment: How Long Does it Last." Social Science Quarterly 65,1 (March 1984): 21-36.
37. Taniguchi, Hiromi
Determinants of Women's Entry into Self-Employment
Social Science Quarterly 83,3 (September 2002): 875-894.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1540-6237.00119/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Hispanics; Mothers; Racial Differences; Self-Employed Workers; Transition, Job to Job

Objective. Building on recent studies that have shown how employment- and family-related characteristics are uniquely intertwined in facilitating women's decisions to work for themselves, I examine the process of transitions into self-employment among white, African-American, and Hispanic women. Methods. This study analyzes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a national probability sample of those born between 1957 and 1964, which allows me to apply a dynamic model for studying women's employment transitions. Results. Regardless of race or ethnicity, factors such as work experience and the presence of a spouse encourage women to become self-employed. At the same time, the distributions of these characteristics for African-American women, and to a lesser extent Latinas as well, significantly account for their slower entry into self-employment. The effect of children on women's entry into self-employment, which earlier studies often found to be positive, especially among whites, is mixed. Conclusions. These findings reveal significant racial/ethnic differences in the process of female self-employment and also call into question the view that self-employment allows working mothers to better combine their careers with family responsibilities than does wage/salary sector employment. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Taniguchi, Hiromi. "Determinants of Women's Entry into Self-Employment." Social Science Quarterly 83,3 (September 2002): 875-894.
38. Taniguchi, Hiromi
Kaufman, Gayle
Degree Completion Among Nontraditional College Students
Social Science Quarterly 86, 4 (December 2005): 912-927.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.0038-4941.2005.00363.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Cognitive Ability; College Dropouts; College Enrollment; Divorce; Education; Education, Adult; Event History; Fatherhood; Gender Differences; Motherhood; Occupational Status; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Objective. With the growing number of older students attending college, one major issue concerning these nontraditional students is their overall low completion rates. We examine factors affecting nontraditional students' degree completion. Methods. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we examine the effects of student characteristics on the probability of finishing college with event history models. Results. Part-time enrollment significantly deters college completion, whereas the number of prior enrollments facilitates it. Being relatively young, having high cognitive ability, and a high-status occupational background also increase the chance of completion, but these effects partly differ by gender. On the other hand, being divorced and having young children, the factors often negatively associated with women's socioeconomic status, suppress degree completion for both genders. Conclusions. Based on these results, we discuss how higher educational institutions and employers might be able to help increase the rate of completion among nontraditional students. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Taniguchi, Hiromi and Gayle Kaufman. "Degree Completion Among Nontraditional College Students." Social Science Quarterly 86, 4 (December 2005): 912-927.
39. Tickamyer, Ann R.
Blee, Kathleen M.
Racial Convergence Thesis in Women's Intergenerational Occupational Mobility
Social Science Quarterly 71,4 (December 1990): 711-728
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility; Mobility, Occupational; Occupational Attainment; Occupational Segregation; Occupations; Parental Influences; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Tickamyer, Ann R. and Kathleen M. Blee. "Racial Convergence Thesis in Women's Intergenerational Occupational Mobility." Social Science Quarterly 71,4 (December 1990): 711-728.
40. Waite, Linda J.
Suter, Larry E.
Shortlidge, Richard L. Jr.
Changes in Child Care Arrangements of Working Women from 1965 to 1971
Social Science Quarterly 58,2 (September 1977): 302-311
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Child Care; Childhood Education, Early; Mothers

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Waite, Linda J., Larry E. Suter and Richard L. Jr. Shortlidge. "Changes in Child Care Arrangements of Working Women from 1965 to 1971." Social Science Quarterly 58,2 (September 1977): 302-311.
41. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Smith, Patricia K.
Does Asthma Impair Wealth Accumulation or Does Wealth Protect Against Asthma?
Social Science Quarterly 97,5 (November 2016): 1070-1081.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ssqu.12293/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Asthma; Inheritance; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: We investigate the association between adult asthma and wealth, testing whether the disease impairs wealth accumulation (social selection model) or if wealth protects against asthma (social causation model).

Methods: We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (n = 7,644) and linear and logistic regressions to estimate the association between wealth and asthma. Changes in relative wealth following an asthma diagnosis and asthma status by increases in wealth through inheritance provide evidence on the causal direction.

Results: Asthma, particularly severe asthma, is associated with lower wealth. Wealth ranking does not change after a diagnosis of asthma, but inheriting a substantial sum is associated with a lower risk of severe asthma.

Conclusion: Wealth appears to protect against severe asthma, supporting the social causation model of disease.

Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. and Patricia K. Smith. "Does Asthma Impair Wealth Accumulation or Does Wealth Protect Against Asthma?" Social Science Quarterly 97,5 (November 2016): 1070-1081.
42. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Smith, Patricia K.
The Freshman 15: A Critical Time for Obesity Intervention or Media Myth?
Social Science Quarterly 92,5 (December 2011): 1389-1407.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-6237.2011.00823.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): College Education; College Enrollment; Health Factors; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: We test whether the phrase “Freshman 15” accurately describes weight change among first-year college students. We also analyze freshmen's weight change during and after college.

Methods: This is the first investigation of the “Freshman 15” to use a nationally representative random sample, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97). The data are analyzed using descriptive statistics, regression analysis, simulations, and longitudinal analysis.

Results: Freshmen gain between 2.5 to 3.5 pounds, on average, over the course of their first year of college. Compared to same-age noncollege attendees, the typical freshman gains only an additional half-pound. Instead of a spike in weight during the freshman year, college-educated individuals exhibit moderate but steady weight gain during and after college.

Conclusion: Anti-obesity efforts directed specifically at college freshmen will likely have little impact on obesity prevalence among young adults.

Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. and Patricia K. Smith. "The Freshman 15: A Critical Time for Obesity Intervention or Media Myth?" Social Science Quarterly 92,5 (December 2011): 1389-1407.
43. Zajacova, Anna
Montez, Jennifer Karas
The Health Penalty of the GED: Testing the Role of Noncognitive Skills, Health Behaviors, and Economic Factors
Social Science Quarterly 98,1 (March 2017): 1-15.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ssqu.12246/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; High School Diploma; Noncognitive Skills; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: The general educational development (GED) diploma is intended to be equivalent to a high school (HS) credential; however, recent evidence finds that GED recipients have worse health than HS graduates. This study aims to explain the health disadvantage, focusing on three domains: noncognitive skills, health behaviors, and economic factors.

Methods: We analyze data on 3,119 HS graduates and GED recipients in the NLSY79 who reported their health status at the age of 40. Logistic and ordinal regression models examine whether the three domains account for the GED health disadvantage.

Results: The GED health disadvantage was jointly explained by lower noncognitive skills, unhealthy behaviors, and adverse economic circumstances, with the latter being particularly important.

Conclusions: A multipronged approach may be necessary to reduce the GED health disadvantage, including improving noncognitive skills during K-12 education, expanding opportunities for employment and living wage for low-skill workers, and continued focus on improving health behaviors.

Bibliography Citation
Zajacova, Anna and Jennifer Karas Montez. "The Health Penalty of the GED: Testing the Role of Noncognitive Skills, Health Behaviors, and Economic Factors." Social Science Quarterly 98,1 (March 2017): 1-15.