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Source: Social Work Research
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Cancian, Maria
Meyer, Daniel R.
Work After Welfare: Women's Work Effort, Occupation, and Economic Well-Being
Social Work Research 24,2 (June 2000): 69-86.
Also: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/nasw/swr/2000/00000024/00000002/art00002
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Association of Social Workers (NASW)
Keyword(s): Employment; Welfare; Work History; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The writers conducted a study to examine the theory that employment, even in low-paid jobs, will lead to economic self-sufficiency. Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, they analyze the relationship between work history and economic success during the first five years after women go off welfare. They find that although, over time, median wages and hours worked increased and earnings generally improved, even by the fifth year, only a quarter of the women consistently worked full-time. They conclude that although current welfare programs focus on moving women into the workplace quickly, employment itself seems not to be a guarantee of economic success. Copyright: Database Producer Copyright (c) the H.W. Wilson Company. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Cancian, Maria and Daniel R. Meyer. "Work After Welfare: Women's Work Effort, Occupation, and Economic Well-Being." Social Work Research 24,2 (June 2000): 69-86.
2. Eamon, Mary Keegan
Structural Model of The Effects of Poverty on Externalizing and Internalizing Behaviors of Four- to Five-Year-Old Children
Social Work Research 24,3 (September 2000): 143-154.
Also: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/nasw/swr/2000/00000024/00000003/art00003
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Association of Social Workers (NASW)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Development; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenthood; Parenting Skills/Styles; Parents, Behavior; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Mother-child data of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were used to identify the parenting practices that mediate relations between persistent, recent and transitional poverty and the externalizing and internalizing behaviors of children four to five years old. Contrary to hypothesized relations, transitional poverty predicts fewer externalizing and internalizing behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Eamon, Mary Keegan. "Structural Model of The Effects of Poverty on Externalizing and Internalizing Behaviors of Four- to Five-Year-Old Children." Social Work Research 24,3 (September 2000): 143-154.
3. Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew
The Effect of Corporal Punishment on Antisocial Behavior in Children
Social Work Research 28,3 (September 2004): 153-163.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,uid&db=aph&an=14315449
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Association of Social Workers (NASW)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Ethnic Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parenting Skills/Styles; Punishment, Corporal; Racial Differences; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study was conducted to examine the effect of corporal punishment on antisocial behavior of children using stronger statistical controls than earlier literature in this area; to examine whether the effect of corporal punishment on antisocial behavior is nonlinear; and to investigate whether the effects of corporal punishment on antisocial behavior differ across racial and ethnic groups. The author used a nonexperimental design and data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The analysis was conducted using fixed-effects methods to control for observed independent variables and unobserved time-invariant variables. Corporal punishment had a nontrivial effect on children's antisocial behavior in later years despite the strong controls introduced by the fixed-effects models. The analysis provides no evidence for differences in the effect of corporal punishment across racial and ethnic groups. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew. "The Effect of Corporal Punishment on Antisocial Behavior in Children." Social Work Research 28,3 (September 2004): 153-163.
4. Lee, Kyunghee
Bidirectional Effects of Early Poverty on Children's Reading and Home Environment Scores: Associations and Ethnic Differences
Social Work Research 33,2 (June 2009): 79-94
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Association of Social Workers (NASW)
Keyword(s): Childhood Education, Early; Children, Home Environment; Children, Poverty; Ethnic Differences; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the author reports secondary analyses that examine the bidirectional effects of the duration of early poverty on children's reading and home environment scores. The author focuses on three specific questions: (1 ) Does the duration of early childhood poverty affect children's reading scores from ages 5 and 6 to ages 11 and 12 after controlling for individual, family, and contextual characteristics? (2) Does the duration of early poverty affect the trajectories for reading and home environment scores from ages 5 and 6 to ages 11 and 12? (3) Are there any differences associated with ethnicity in the trajectories for reading and home scores, and do these differences depend on the duration of early poverty? Findings suggest that a longer duration of early poverty had significant adverse effects on children and these adverse effects became more pronounced as children grew. Early poverty also negatively affected home scores at ages 5 and 6, which, in turn, affected reading scores at ages 5 and 6 and continuously did so as the children grew older. However, these associations between home and reading scores were different across ethnicities with regard to the duration of poverty. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Kyunghee. "Bidirectional Effects of Early Poverty on Children's Reading and Home Environment Scores: Associations and Ethnic Differences." Social Work Research 33,2 (June 2009): 79-94.
5. Robertson, John George
Young Residential Fathers Have Lower Earnings: Implications for Child Support Enforcement
Social Work Research 21,4 (December 1997): 211-223
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Association of Social Workers (NASW)
Keyword(s): Child Support; Earnings; Education; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Presence; Job Training; Male Sample; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The study reported here used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to compare the earnings and work efforts of young nonresidential fathers, residential fathers, and men without children. It found that nonresidential fathers earned less, had lower hourly wages, and worked fewer hours than the other groups of men, primarily because of lower levels of education and job training. These findings lead to the conclusion that obtaining sufficient child support payments from nonresidential fathers will require more than strengthening the enforcement of child support laws. Policy initiatives that foster greater educational and employment opportunities are required. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved):
Bibliography Citation
Robertson, John George. "Young Residential Fathers Have Lower Earnings: Implications for Child Support Enforcement." Social Work Research 21,4 (December 1997): 211-223.