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Source: Sociological Focus
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Bersani, Bianca Elizabeth
Chapple, Constance L.
School Failure as an Adolescent Turning Point
Sociological Focus 40, 3 (2007): 370-391
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: North Central Sociological Association ==> Routledge (new in 2012)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Grade Retention/Repeat Grade; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Dropouts; Life Course; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); School Dropouts; Self-Regulation/Self-Control; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recently, researchers have devoted significant attention to the influence of turning points such as marriage, employment, and military service on criminal desistance in adulthood. Because offending peaks in adolescence, the relative lack of research on influential adolescent turnings points is notable. Given the extensive research linking school failure to deleterious adult development, we propose that school failure (late grade retention and school dropout) is a marked transition in adolescence with the potential to operate as a turning point in the life course. Using longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), we first examine structural, relational and individual predictors of school failure in adolescence. Second, we assess whether school failure amplifies delinquency in late adolescence. We find evidence supporting our contention that school failure operates as an adolescent turning point and we confirm that, school failure is significantly predicted by structural, relational, and individual factors. Although school failure may be thought of as the end result of a long-term process of academic disengagement, our research also suggests that it is a pivotal, negative turning point in the life course.
Bibliography Citation
Bersani, Bianca Elizabeth and Constance L. Chapple. "School Failure as an Adolescent Turning Point." Sociological Focus 40, 3 (2007): 370-391.
2. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Family Income on Child and Adolescent Bullying
Sociological Focus 37,1 (February 2004): 25-41
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: North Central Sociological Association ==> Routledge (new in 2012)
Keyword(s): Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Problems; Bullying/Victimization; Income Level; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Utilizing data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Mother and Child Samples, I investigate the relationship between bullying behavior & family income. I test the hypothesis that the relationship between bullying & socioeconomic status is curvilinear, with children from low & high-income families engaging in higher levels of bullying than those from middle-income families. Further, within the proposed U-shaped relationship between bullying & family income, I examine whether children from low-income families bully more than those from high-income families. As expected, there is a curvilinear relationship between bullying & income. While low-income youth are at greatest risk for engaging in bullying, those youth at the upper end of the income gradient also have a higher propensity for participating in bullying behavior, compared to their more moderate-income counterparts. Although levels of bullying behavior decrease over time at both the lower & upper ends of the income gradient, strong curvilinear associations between bullying & family income exist both in cross-sectional & longitudinal analyses. Further, child's age, school standing, & the amount of emotional support offered to the child are important factors in the initiation of bullying & in whether the behavior persists over time.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André. "Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Family Income on Child and Adolescent Bullying." Sociological Focus 37,1 (February 2004): 25-41.
3. Coverdill, James E.
Kraft, Joan Marie
Manley, Kelly Shannon
Employment History, the Sex Typing of Occupations, Pay and Change in Gender-Role Attitudes: A Longitudinal Study of Young Married Women
Sociological Focus 29,1 (February 1996): 47-60.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/20831767
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: North Central Sociological Association ==> Routledge (new in 2012)
Keyword(s): Employment; Employment, History; Gender Differences; Income; Marriage; Occupational Segregation; Sex Roles; Wives; Women's Roles; Women's Studies; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The extent to which employment history & occupational segregation by gender & pay cause young married women's gender-role attitudes to change over time is examined. Longitudinal data are drawn from the youth cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience (1982- 1987) for a national sample of 2,499 women ages 22-29. The results show that (1) employed women were less traditional in their views of women's appropriate roles, (2) the sex typing of occupations does not appear consequential for women's gender-role attitudes over time, & (3) both pay levels & increases alter gender-role attitudes. 4 Tables, 12 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1997, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Coverdill, James E., Joan Marie Kraft and Kelly Shannon Manley. "Employment History, the Sex Typing of Occupations, Pay and Change in Gender-Role Attitudes: A Longitudinal Study of Young Married Women." Sociological Focus 29,1 (February 1996): 47-60.
4. Monk-Turner, Elizabeth A.
Educational Differentiation and Status Attainments: The Community College Controversy
Sociological Focus 21,2 (April 1988): 141-152.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/20831469
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: North Central Sociological Association ==> Routledge (new in 2012)
Keyword(s): College Education; Colleges; Duncan Index; Educational Returns; Life Cycle Research; Occupational Status; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper presents an examination of how community college attendance shapes adult socioeconomic attainment in the United States, from the perspective of human capital theory, using data on 2 youth cohorts of a national longitudinal survey regarding labor market experiences (SIGMA number of cases = 2,125). Type of college first entered is a significant variable influencing earning ability and occupational status even when holding constant variation in ability, socioeconomic background, and college goal. The rate of return to each additional year of education for 4-year college entrants is 7.9%; for community college students, 5.4%. The average status of 4-year college entrants' jobs is significantly higher than those of community college entrants. It is concluded that community college entrance entails a wage and occupational penalty early in the life cycle that outweighs the opportunity cost of first entering a 4-year college. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc.]
Bibliography Citation
Monk-Turner, Elizabeth A. "Educational Differentiation and Status Attainments: The Community College Controversy." Sociological Focus 21,2 (April 1988): 141-152.
5. Rogers, Stacy J.
Marital Quality, Mothers' Parenting and Children's Outcomes: A Comparison of Mother/Father and Mother/Stepfather Families
Sociological Focus 29,4 (October 1996): 325-340.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/20831797
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: North Central Sociological Association ==> Routledge (new in 2012)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Family Structure; Marital Conflict; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The present research investigates the patterns of associations among marital quality, mothers' parenting practices and children's behavior problems and self-esteem in mother/stepfather and mother/father families. Data from a sample of 697 8- to 12-year-old children from the 1988 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are used to investigate these associations. The results indicate marital quality is significantly associated with mothers' parenting and children's outcomes in mother/father families. However, in mother/stepfather families marital conflict is not associated with mothers' parenting or children's outcomes. Mothers' authoritative parenting is significantly related to children's outcomes in both family types. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the annual meeting of the Population Association of America, May 1994.
Bibliography Citation
Rogers, Stacy J. "Marital Quality, Mothers' Parenting and Children's Outcomes: A Comparison of Mother/Father and Mother/Stepfather Families." Sociological Focus 29,4 (October 1996): 325-340.