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Source: Sociological Forum
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Baird, Chardie L.
Going Against the Flow: A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of Cognitive Skills and Gender Beliefs on Occupational Aspirations and Outcomes
Sociological Forum 27,4 (December 2012): 986-1009.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1573-7861.2012.01365.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; Expectations/Intentions; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Gender Differences; Occupational Aspirations; Occupational Segregation; Skills

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Occupational sex segregation persists in part due to cultural beliefs in the existence of gender differences in skills. This article explores potential resistance to the gender-typical aspirations and outcomes that re-create occupational sex segregation: cognitive skills in gender-atypical areas (i.e., math skills for women and verbal skills for men) and beliefs about women’s prioritization of family over paid work. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort, I find that individuals with skills in areas considered gender atypical have less traditional occupational aspirations and outcomes than their otherwise-similar counterparts. This process varies by gender, however. The results reflect the differential valuation of math and verbal skills. I conclude that programs designed to encourage women to pursue gender-atypical occupations that align with their gender-atypical skills are focusing on the least resistant group.
Bibliography Citation
Baird, Chardie L. "Going Against the Flow: A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of Cognitive Skills and Gender Beliefs on Occupational Aspirations and Outcomes." Sociological Forum 27,4 (December 2012): 986-1009.
2. Jacobs, Jerry A.
Karen, David
McClelland, Katherine
Dynamics of Young Men's Career Aspirations
Sociological Forum 6,4 (December 1991): 609-639
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Job Aspirations; Racial Differences; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

The dynamics of career aspirations are explored using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Men (N = 5,125 males ages 14-24 followed since 1966). Results demonstrate that the overwhelming majority of young men have high aspirations at some point, though they decline with age. Occupational aspirations, highly unstable among teenagers, become more stable with age. Racial and social origin differences in aspirations grow with age, reflecting widening race and social class differences in educational attainment. 7 Tables, 47 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1992, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Jacobs, Jerry A., David Karen and Katherine McClelland. "Dynamics of Young Men's Career Aspirations." Sociological Forum 6,4 (December 1991): 609-639.
3. Ramey, David
The Social Construction of Child Social Control via Criminalization and Medicalization: Why Race Matters
Sociological Forum 33,1 (March 2018): 139-164.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/socf.12403
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Attention/Attention Deficit; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Adjustment Problems; Ethnic Differences; Racial Differences; School Suspension/Expulsion; Self-Control/Self-Regulation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Scholars point to two trends in the social construction of child social control: criminalization and medicalization. To control child behavior, schools and parents turn to strategies motivated by both the criminal justice and mental health systems. For example, school suspension and expulsion rates in the United States have increased alongside the use of therapy or medication for children diagnosed with behavior disorders. Despite these concurrent trends, research rarely considers how criminalization and medicalization operate as opposing or collaborative approaches to child misbehavior. In this article, I take advantage of a prospective longitudinal panel study to examine patterns of school punishment and/or the medicalization in a sample of children between the ages of 5 and 14 over 25 years. Findings demonstrate that black children have higher odds of experiencing punishment than white children, but Hispanic children do not. Additionally, black and Hispanic children have lower odds of receiving therapy or medication than white children. Furthermore, racial/ethnic disparities in punishment or therapy/medication use vary across children with higher or lower behavior problem scores.
Bibliography Citation
Ramey, David. "The Social Construction of Child Social Control via Criminalization and Medicalization: Why Race Matters." Sociological Forum 33,1 (March 2018): 139-164.