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Source: Sociology of Work and Occupations
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Chenoweth, Lillian Cochran
Maret, Elizabeth G.
The Career Patterns of Mature American Women
Sociology of Work and Occupations 7,2 (May 1980): 222-251.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/7/2/222.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Employment, Intermittent; Family Influences; Family Resources; Housework/Housewives; Husbands, Influence

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study identifies three major life-career patterns of mature American women: home, labor force, and mixed careers. High commitment to traditional familial roles and values, high familial resources, and low human capital tend to reflect women with home careers. In comparison, low commitment to traditional roles and values, low familial resources, and high human capital represent women in the labor force. In addition, the results suggest that mature women are likely to have experienced considerable involvement in the labor force regardless of their familial investments, familial resources, or human capital investments.
Bibliography Citation
Chenoweth, Lillian Cochran and Elizabeth G. Maret. "The Career Patterns of Mature American Women." Sociology of Work and Occupations 7,2 (May 1980): 222-251.
2. Hudis, Paula M.
Commitment to Work and Wages: Earnings Differences of Black and White Women
Sociology of Work and Occupations 4,2 (May 1977): 123-145.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/4/2/123.full.pdf+html
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Family Resources; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wages, Women; Work Attitudes; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Findings indicate that the lower economic status of black women is caused by lower human capital accumulation and less prestigious occupations. Black women partially compensate for such deficiencies by achieving a higher rate of wage return on their human capital and occupational status they obtain. The results show that work experience does influence differential wage returns to schooling for blacks and occupational status for blacks and whites. In addition, the analyses provide support for an occupational decision-making explanation which contributes to observed differentials in wage returns to schooling.
Bibliography Citation
Hudis, Paula M. "Commitment to Work and Wages: Earnings Differences of Black and White Women." Sociology of Work and Occupations 4,2 (May 1977): 123-145.
3. Rosenfeld, Rachel A.
Women's Occupational Careers: Individual and Structural Explanations
Sociology of Work and Occupations 6,3 (August 1979): 283-311.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/6/3/283.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Duncan Index; Employment; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Men tend to move up in status over their work lives; women tend to remain at the same level. Two types of explanations can be used to explain this difference: (1) those focusing on individual characteristics which tend to vary by sex, especially employment patterns; and (2) those focusing on the differences in opportunity structure by sex. Research is reviewed which attempts to examine more directly the effect of individual versus structural factors on occupational achievement. While the evidence is not clear-cut, it does suggest more attention be paid in quantitative research on women's achievements to the structure of opportunity.
Bibliography Citation
Rosenfeld, Rachel A. "Women's Occupational Careers: Individual and Structural Explanations." Sociology of Work and Occupations 6,3 (August 1979): 283-311.
4. Spitze, Glenna D.
Waite, Linda J.
Labor Force and Work Attitudes
Sociology of Work and Occupations 7,1 (February 1980): 3-32.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/7/1/3.abstract
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; Family Influences; Sex Roles; Work Attitudes; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The authors examine the relationship between work related attitudes held while in school and early labor force experiences. Findings show that neither variable affects the extent of employment during the first four years after schooling is completed. Women with long range work plans usually begin in low status and low paying jobs which possibly have a greater chance for advancement, compared to those who do not plan for later work. During this early period, attitudes and tastes change in response to certain job characteristics. However, strong tastes for market work may influence early labor force behavior which maximize long term benefits of employment and so might affect timing of work, childbearing, and characteristics of beginning jobs.
Bibliography Citation
Spitze, Glenna D. and Linda J. Waite. "Labor Force and Work Attitudes." Sociology of Work and Occupations 7,1 (February 1980): 3-32.