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Source: The Ohio State University
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Johnson, Royel Montel
Measuring the Influence of Juvenile Arrest on the Odds of Four-Year College Enrollment for Black Males: An NLSY Analysis
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Educational Studies, The Ohio State University, 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: The Ohio State University
Keyword(s): Arrests; Black Youth; College Enrollment; Criminal Justice System

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Black male youth make up 16% of all public school students in the United States, though they constitute 31% of all juvenile arrests. Very little is known from research about the long-term consequences for such contact on their odds of college enrollment. Thus, the purpose of this study was to test the relationship between Black males' early contact with the criminal justice system through arrest on their probability of enrolling in a four-year college, using a nationally representative sample of approximately 1100 Black males who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (1997). Survey data were analyzed using descriptive, chi-square, and hierarchical binomial logistic regression techniques. Results expose pervasive limits on Black males' college-going, reveal the statistically significant influence of early arrest on college entry, and have far-reaching implications for research, policy, and outreach.
Bibliography Citation
Johnson, Royel Montel. Measuring the Influence of Juvenile Arrest on the Odds of Four-Year College Enrollment for Black Males: An NLSY Analysis. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Educational Studies, The Ohio State University, 2015.
2. Mernitz, Sara E.
Long-term Cohabitation: Prevalence, Predictors, and Mental Health Outcomes
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Human Sciences, The Ohio State University, 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: The Ohio State University
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Health, Mental; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This dissertation study enhances scholarship on cohabitation by examining long-term cohabitation during a critical period in the life course, young adulthood, a time when these early relationships may alter young adults' future relationship and union trajectories. Further, a critical developmental task during these years is establishing intimacy within romantic unions, suggesting that cohabitation during this period is more important than at any other developmental stage. I use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) to examine the prevalence of long-term cohabitation over time, identify variables contributing to transitions out of cohabitation and long-term cohabitation, and the mental health implications of young adult long-term cohabitation. These data are well-suited for this study as all are nationally-representative longitudinal studies containing high-quality cohabitation data.
Bibliography Citation
Mernitz, Sara E. Long-term Cohabitation: Prevalence, Predictors, and Mental Health Outcomes. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Human Sciences, The Ohio State University, 2016.
3. Mott, Frank L.
Teen Parenting: Implications for the Mother and Child Generations
Presented: Columbus OH, The Justice for Children Project Conference, Ohio State University, November 1995
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: The Ohio State University
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Children, Well-Being; Cohabitation; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles; Sexual Activity; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the special problem of teen parenting and issues which will help examine the needs of children, particularly those growing up in disadvantaged environments. The ambiguity in the title focuses on two clearly inseparable issues: the problems and issues facing teen parents and their children--the problems of children raising children. The issue of the well-being of adolescents and their children cannot be effectively discussed outside of the context of the early sexual activity actually happening now, and how this may differ from what was true only a few decades ago. The issue of early sexual activity is discussed within a social context and suggestion on how the issue may be intimately linked with the well-being of both young mothers and their children are presented.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Teen Parenting: Implications for the Mother and Child Generations." Presented: Columbus OH, The Justice for Children Project Conference, Ohio State University, November 1995.
4. Richards, Jonathan Brent
Three Essays on Noncognitive Skills and Youth Education and Labor Outcomes
Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 2013
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: The Ohio State University
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Head Start; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Modeling, Fixed Effects; Noncognitive Skills; Parental Investments

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In my third paper, I look at whether children who participate in Head Start have better scores on the Antisocial sub-scale of the Behavior Problems Index (or BPI), a scale measuring problem behavior in children. I use CNLSY data from the USA. Like other papers in the Head Start literature, such as Currie and Thomas (1995), I control for family fixed effects to deal with unobserved household-level heterogeneity that could influence whether a child attends Head Start. Unlike Carneiro and Ginja (2008), I control for measures of parental investment during Head Start. I also look at levels of antisocial behavior shortly after attending Head Start, while they look at outcomes when the child is in their pre-teen or teen years. Unlike Carneiro and Ginja, I find evidence that Head Start participation raises a child’s level of antisocial behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Richards, Jonathan Brent. Three Essays on Noncognitive Skills and Youth Education and Labor Outcomes. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 2013.