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Source: The Sociological Quarterly
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Bersani, Bianca Elizabeth
DiPietro, Stephanie
Marriage and Offending: Examining the Significance of Marriage among the Children of Immigrants
The Sociology Quarterly 57,2 (Spring 2016): 304-332.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/tsq.12116/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Crime; Immigrants; Marriage; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although research shows that involvement in crime varies across immigrant generations, less is known about why this is so. Using 13 waves of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 data, we examine the influence of marriage—a key correlate of desistance from crime—to understand more fully patterns of offending across immigrant generations during the transition to adulthood. Results indicate a lower prevalence of offending among first-generation immigrants compared with their second-generation and third-plus-generation peers; however, among active offenders, rates of offending are similar across groups. Notably, marriage exerts a significantly stronger effect on offending for second-generation immigrants, suggesting that, while assimilation may be associated with more offending, it is also associated with a greater potency of marriage in promoting desistance from crime.
Bibliography Citation
Bersani, Bianca Elizabeth and Stephanie DiPietro. "Marriage and Offending: Examining the Significance of Marriage among the Children of Immigrants." The Sociology Quarterly 57,2 (Spring 2016): 304-332.
2. Hodson, Randy
Dwyer, Rachel E.
Neilson, Lisa A.
Credit Card Blues: The Middle Class and the Hidden Costs of Easy Credit
The Sociology Quarterly 55,2 (Spring 2014): 315-340.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/tsq.12059/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Depression (see also CESD); Financial Behaviors/Decisions; Health, Mental; Stress

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In an era of increased access to credit, it becomes increasingly important to understand the consequences of taking on unsecured consumer debt. We argue that credit can have both positive and negative consequences resulting from its ability to smooth life transitions and difficulties but that this occurs simultaneously with increased financial risks and stress resulting from carrying unsecured debt. We find that those in the middle of the income distribution suffer the greatest disruptions to mental health from carrying debt. Affluent borrowers are relatively unmoved by debt, suggesting the use of short-term debt as a convenience strategy for the financially well heeled. The least advantaged borrowers also suffer emotionally less from debt, possibly because securing spendable funds for necessities remains their most pressing concern. The onset of the Great Recession, however, produced increased emotional distress for all classes.
Bibliography Citation
Hodson, Randy, Rachel E. Dwyer and Lisa A. Neilson. "Credit Card Blues: The Middle Class and the Hidden Costs of Easy Credit." The Sociology Quarterly 55,2 (Spring 2014): 315-340.
3. Hollister, Matissa
Employer and Occupational Instability in Two Cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys
The Sociological Quarterly 53,2 (Spring 2012): 238-263.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1533-8525.2012.01233.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Employment, History; Gender Differences; Labor Force Participation; Occupational Choice; Occupations; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous research on trends in employer and occupational stability found evidence of declines in stability among men but contradictory results for women. I provide new insights into these patterns by simultaneously analyzing employer and occupation changes, and by examining a more detailed set of transition types. I show that the patterns for women are quite similar to those of men but are masked by declines in transitions from employment to out of the labor force. Finally, I find that while some of the changes may bring increased opportunities for wage increases, they bring even greater risks of wage losses.
Bibliography Citation
Hollister, Matissa. "Employer and Occupational Instability in Two Cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys." The Sociological Quarterly 53,2 (Spring 2012): 238-263.
4. Park, Kiwoong
Yang, Tse-Chuan
The Long-term Effects of Self-Esteem on Depression: The Roles of Alcohol and Substance Use During Young Adulthood
The Sociology Quarterly 58,3 (2017): 429-446.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00380253.2017.1331718
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Self-Esteem; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979, this study examines the roles of alcohol and substance use as mediators in the mechanism between self-esteem and depression, and investigates whether the mechanism works for both men and women. Results demonstrate that alcohol and substance use during young adulthood mediates the effect of self-esteem on depression among men. Furthermore, self-esteem during young adulthood remains a determinant of high depression in middle adulthood. However, we did not find evidence to support that same mechanism among women. Our findings provide insight into how self-esteem affects depression over the transition from young to middle adulthood, and elucidate potential gendered responsivity to low self-esteem.
Bibliography Citation
Park, Kiwoong and Tse-Chuan Yang. "The Long-term Effects of Self-Esteem on Depression: The Roles of Alcohol and Substance Use During Young Adulthood." The Sociology Quarterly 58,3 (2017): 429-446.