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Source: U.S. Government Printing Office
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Andrisani, Paul J.
Labor Market Data Needs from the Perspective of 'Dual' or 'Segmented Labor' Market Research: A Comment on Harrison and Sum
In: Counting the Labor Force. National Commission on Employment and Unemployment Statistics, ed. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1979
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Dual Economic Theory; Employment; Research Methodology

This paper comments on Harrison and Sum's paper, which includes a synopsis of segmented labor market theory, hypotheses, and data needs. They criticize existing public use data bases and make recommendations for changes. The author agrees with their criticism in part, and points out ways of modifying the new NLSY cohort to address most of the issues raised in the Harrison-Sum paper.
Bibliography Citation
Andrisani, Paul J. "Labor Market Data Needs from the Perspective of 'Dual' or 'Segmented Labor' Market Research: A Comment on Harrison and Sum" In: Counting the Labor Force. National Commission on Employment and Unemployment Statistics, ed. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1979
2. Egge, Karl Albert
Kohen, Andrew I.
Shea, John R.
Zeller, Frederick A.
Changes in the Federal Minimum Wage and the Employment of Young Men, 1966-67
In: Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages: Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 1657. Washington, DC: U.S. GPO, 1970
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Minimum Wage; Teenagers; Unemployment, Youth

These data permit the "before and after" experience of youth to be related to the wage they were earning before the new minimum became effective. The authors ask whether those youth whose marginal productivity was lower than the newly established minimum had relatively less favorable employment experiences after the minimum wage changes than those whose wages already had been above the minimums. One would expect these low productivity youngsters to be among the first to feel whatever restriction of employment opportunities the minimum wage created. The fact that the authors have been unable to find in their data any general tendency for the foregoing relationship leads to the conclusion that if the minimum wage increases did indeed create unemployment among youth, the effect was not a pronounced one. Even when the analysis was focused on these subgroups of young men who might, on a priori grounds, be expected to be most vulnerable to the impact of the minimum wage, only a small number of such subgroups showed any signs of adversity.
Bibliography Citation
Egge, Karl Albert, Andrew I. Kohen, John R. Shea and Frederick A. Zeller. "Changes in the Federal Minimum Wage and the Employment of Young Men, 1966-67" In: Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages: Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 1657. Washington, DC: U.S. GPO, 1970
3. General Accounting Office
Disability of Men
Information Brief No. 22, White House Conference on Aging, 1977
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Benefits, Disability; Disabled Workers; Health Factors; Social Security; Unemployment Compensation; Veterans; Work Attachment

The objective of this discussion is to provide some insight into the disability of men. Specifically, the data presented is about men whose ages ranged from 45 to 59 in 1966 and follows them as they aged over the 1966 to 1976 period. Analysis was directed towards showing sources of disability payments and whether the sources changed over time and describing what happens over time to men who were receiving disability payment in 1966. Overall, 11.1 percent of the sampled men were receiving disability payments in 1966. Another 20 percent of the sample reported health related problems who were not receiving any payments. The Veterans Administration was the major source of disability payments, but there were considerable differences between the age groups. The Veterans Administration was the largest source for both the 45 to 49 and 50 to 54 age groups. These percentages reflected a high concentration of World War II veterans with service connected disabilities. The second highest source for the 45 to 49 age group was Workmen's Compensation. The 55 to 59 age group received the largest portion of their payments from Social Security (33.2 percent). Many persons receiving disability payments were full-time workers. At least 50 percent of those drawing just a Veterans Administration disability were working 48 weeks or more during 1966. The percent of men continuing to receive disability payments decreased over time from 51 percent in 1966 to 24 percent in 1975. [AgeLine]
Bibliography Citation
General Accounting Office. "Disability of Men." Information Brief No. 22, White House Conference on Aging, 1977.
4. Hamel, Harvey R.
Goldberg, Marvin
Wage Expectation
In: Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages: Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 1657. Washington, DC: U.S. GPO, 1970
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Employment, Youth; Minimum Wage; Racial Differences; Unemployment, Youth; Wage Levels; Wages, Reservation

This chapter addresses teenagers' wage expectation using the Young Men's cohort of the NLS and also the Urban Employment Surveys of six U.S. cities. Both wages earned and wage expectations increase with age for both racial groups and are higher for whites than for other races. Contrary to the hypothesis of unreasonable expectations, the average wage expected by unemployed young men is, within any age-color group, lower than that for the employed. However, the proportion of unemployed teenage males willing to accept employment at a wage below $1.40 an hour (the minimum wage at that time) was less than the proportion of employed teenagers actually receiving less than $1.40, except among black and other races 15-17 years old. The tendency for wage expectations for most unemployed teenage groups to fall in the $1.40-$1.99 range to a greater extent than is true of wages received by employed teenagers suggests the possibility that expectations may be affected by the level of the minimum wage. For the 1517 year old group, wage expectations and wage levels received are about the same. Among the 18-19 year old group, however, wage expectations among unemployed whites are above the wage levels received by those employed. For blacks and other races in that age group, average age expectations and wages received are almost the same. Unemployed 18-19 year olds of both white and other races are less willing to take low wage jobs. It seems that the average wage expected by the unemployed teenager is below that received by those employed. The unemployed teenager appears, however, slightly disinclined to accept the lowest wage jobs compared, at least, with his employed counterpart. However, there are large numbers of teenagers, both unemployed and out of the labor force, who did indicate a willingness to accept low-wage employment--at least if the right job came along.
Bibliography Citation
Hamel, Harvey R. and Marvin Goldberg. "Wage Expectation" In: Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages: Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 1657. Washington, DC: U.S. GPO, 1970
5. Harrison, Bennett
Sum, Andrew
Data Requirements for 'Dual' or 'Segmented' Labor Market Research
In: Counting the Labor Force Volume 1: Appendix Concepts and Data Needs. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1980
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Employment; Longitudinal Surveys; Research Methodology

This paper reviews 10 major current and/or previously administered labor force, employment, and earnings surveys to assess the extent to which they collected data on the types of variables relevant to research on segmented labor markets.
Bibliography Citation
Harrison, Bennett and Andrew Sum. "Data Requirements for 'Dual' or 'Segmented' Labor Market Research" In: Counting the Labor Force Volume 1: Appendix Concepts and Data Needs. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1980
6. National Commission on Employment and Unemployment Statistics
Counting the Labor Force
Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1979.
Also: http://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/2891355
Cohort(s): NLS General, NLSY79, Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Data Analysis; Labor Force Participation; Statistical Analysis

The National Commission of Employment and Unemployment Statistics submits is final report, 'Counting the Labor Force.' The report was prepared in accordance with the requirements of Public Law 94-444. We considered that the nation is served by a comprehensive labor force data system expertly prepared by a cadre of dedicated public servants. But if the statistics are to reflect changing economic conditions and meet policy needs, periodic revisions and improvements are necessary. This report pinpoints where enrichment and upgrading can be achieved at reasonable costs.
Bibliography Citation
National Commission on Employment and Unemployment Statistics. Counting the Labor Force. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1979..
7. Shea, John R.
Kim, Sookon
Roderick, Roger D.
Dual Careers, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of the Labor Market Experience of Women
Washington DC: US GPO, 1973
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Family Influences; Health Factors; Job Satisfaction; Marital Status; Mobility, Job; Sex Roles; Wages; Wives

Data from the first three stages of the study of 5,083 women who were 30 to 44 in 1967 are used to determine the labor market experience of women. How marital status, the number and ages of children present in the home, health attitudes and physical condition influence women's employment is discussed. Differences in job status are then examined through changes from 1967 to 1969 in rate of pay, job satisfaction, and employer. Correlates of interfirm movement are also investigated, as well as some consequences of job changing. Changing employers, as a rule, appears to be associated with a higher rate of pay and a higher degree of job satisfaction, and, among white women, a change in marital status.
Bibliography Citation
Shea, John R., Sookon Kim and Roger D. Roderick. Dual Careers, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of the Labor Market Experience of Women. Washington DC: US GPO, 1973.
8. Taggart, Robert
Youth Knowledge Development Report 2.1 - Youth Unemployment: Its Measurement and Meaning
Report, Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1980
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Job Search; Teenagers; Unemployment, Youth

This volume contains papers presented at the 1978 Conference on Employment Statistics and Youth. Several of the papers reported results based on the NLS of Young Men and Young Women. These papers are abstracted and included as separate entries in this bibliography.
Bibliography Citation
Taggart, Robert. "Youth Knowledge Development Report 2.1 - Youth Unemployment: Its Measurement and Meaning." Report, Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1980.
9. Zeller, Frederick A.
Shea, John R.
Kohen, Andrew I.
Meyer, Jack A.
Career Thresholds, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational and Labor Market Experience of Male Youth
Washington DC: US GPO, 1971
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Dropouts; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Family Influences; High School; Job Training; Mobility; Mobility, Job

The present report, the second in the series on the NLS of Young Men, summarizes some of the findings of the second round of interviews with that cohort that were conducted in the autumn of l967. Based exclusively on tabular data, its primary purpose is to describe the magnitude and patterns of change that occurred in the educational and labor market status of the youth during the 12-month period between the first and second surveys. The age span covered in the survey includes those years of a young man's life in which he first becomes integrated into the world of work. This is a critical period in the total socialization process. The young man's subsequent labor market behavior is influenced substantially by his educational and early labor market experiences. In this report, the authors have begun an analysis of these experiences by focusing on the magnitude and character of various changes that have occurred over a one-year period--in school enrollment status, labor force participation, unemployment experience, occupational and interfirm mobility, and educational aspirations.
Bibliography Citation
Zeller, Frederick A., John R. Shea, Andrew I. Kohen and Jack A. Meyer. Career Thresholds, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational and Labor Market Experience of Male Youth. Washington DC: US GPO, 1971.