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Source: Urban Studies
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Stoll, Michael A.
When Jobs Move, Do Black and Latino Men Lose? The Effect of Growth in Job Decentralisation on Young Men's Jobless Incidence and Duration
Urban Studies 35,12 (December 1998): 2221-2239
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Glasgow
Keyword(s): Demography; Economics of Discrimination; Economics of Minorities; Economics, Regional; Labor Market Studies, Geographic; Modeling; Quits; Retirement; Rural/Urban Migration; Unemployment; Urban and Regional Planning

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The spatial mismatch hypothesis suggests that the movement of jobs from central cities to suburbs negatively affects blacks' employment both absolutely and relative to whites. In this paper, data are used from the 1984 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the 1972 and 1982 US Census of Industries to examine the effect of growth in metropolitan job decentralisation on young males' jobless incidence and duration. Overall, growth in job decentralisation is found to affect negatively young black and Latino males' jobless incidence and duration. In addition, the metropolitan unemployment rate is found to affect negatively young black males' jobless incidence and durations only. Thus, the combination of full employment policies with policies to alter the distribution of jobs in metropolitan areas in favour of the central city will do more to improve young black and Latino males' labour market position than either approach by itself.
Bibliography Citation
Stoll, Michael A. "When Jobs Move, Do Black and Latino Men Lose? The Effect of Growth in Job Decentralisation on Young Men's Jobless Incidence and Duration." Urban Studies 35,12 (December 1998): 2221-2239.