Search Results

Source: Women and Criminal Justice
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Curcio, Gina
Pattavina, April
Still Paying for the Past: Examining Gender Differences in Employment Among Individuals with a Criminal Record
Women and Criminal Justice published online (18 April 2018): DOI: 10.1080/08974454.2018.1441773.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08974454.2018.1441773
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Crime; Criminal Justice System; Employment; Gender Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although many studies have examined employment outcomes of those with criminal convictions, no study to date has examined gender differences in employment outcomes of individuals with criminal convictions using a nationally representative sample of individuals from the United States. In this study, we use data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine differences in employment after a criminal conviction for females and males. Results reveal that for women with a conviction, a drug offense and having dependent children limit the number of weeks of employment. For males, race, education, age at first conviction, and a subsequent conviction predict the number of weeks employed. Implications for policy and future research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Curcio, Gina and April Pattavina. "Still Paying for the Past: Examining Gender Differences in Employment Among Individuals with a Criminal Record." Women and Criminal Justice published online (18 April 2018): DOI: 10.1080/08974454.2018.1441773.
2. Schoenberger, Nicole
Rocheleau, Gregory C.
Effective Parenting and Self-Control: Difference by Gender
Women and Criminal Justice 27,5 (2017): 271-286.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08974454.2016.1261071
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Interaction; Parental Influences; Punishment, Corporal; Self-Control/Self-Regulation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Few studies have tested whether the process through which self-control is developed varies by gender. This study examines whether gender differences in self-control among children are explained by differences in parental supervision, monitoring, and discipline using a sample of mothers from National Longitudinal Study of Youth Children and Young Adults (NLSY79-CYA) data (N = 862). This study also examines whether the relationship between parenting factors and self-control is moderated by gender. Using ordinary least squares regression, findings showed that females report higher levels of self-control than males and that this difference is accounted for by parenting factors. Moreover, this study found that the effect of parental discipline for grades and spanking on self-control varied by gender.
Bibliography Citation
Schoenberger, Nicole and Gregory C. Rocheleau. "Effective Parenting and Self-Control: Difference by Gender." Women and Criminal Justice 27,5 (2017): 271-286.