Search Results

Source: Work Employment and Society
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Evertsson, Marie
Grunow, Daniela
Aisenbrey, Silke
Work Interruptions and Young Women’s Career Prospects in Germany, Sweden and the US
Work, Employment and Society 30,2 (April 2016): 291-308.
Also: http://wes.sagepub.com/content/30/2/291
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Cross-national Analysis; Employment, Intermittent; German Life History Study; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Mobility, Occupational; Swedish Level of Living Survey; Unemployment; Work Histories

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article assesses the impact of discontinuous work histories on young women's occupational mobility in Germany, Sweden and the US. Women with continuous work histories are compared with those with gaps due to family leave, unemployment, or other reasons. The German Life History Study, the Swedish Level of Living Survey and the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are used to estimate Cox regression models of the transition rate to downward or upward occupational mobility. The results indicate that US women face increased downward mobility with increasing duration of both family leave and unemployment. German women with unemployment experience are also more likely to encounter downward mobility, but no such relationship is found for family leave. In Sweden, family leave experience reduces the chances of upward mobility. Results question the human capital approach, according to which skills should deteriorate at the same rate independent of the reason for the leave.
Bibliography Citation
Evertsson, Marie, Daniela Grunow and Silke Aisenbrey. "Work Interruptions and Young Women’s Career Prospects in Germany, Sweden and the US." Work, Employment and Society 30,2 (April 2016): 291-308.
2. Han, Wen-Jui
Shift Work and Child Behavioral Outcomes
Work Employment and Society 22,1(March 2008): 67-87
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Economic Well-Being; Family Income; Marital Instability; Maternal Employment; Parents, Single; Shift Workers; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a large, contemporary US dataset, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - Child Supplement, this article explores the relationship between maternal shift work and the behavioral outcomes for children aged four to 10. Special attention was given to subgroups of children (e.g. based on family type, family income, and mother's occupation and working hours) and the patterns of parental work schedules and work hours. Regression results suggest that maternal shift work may contribute to more behavioral problems. Of all children whose mothers worked non-day shifts, the strongest associations were found for children who lived in single-mother or low-income families, whose mothers worked in cashier or service occupations, and whose mothers worked non-day shifts full-time. Implications for future research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Han, Wen-Jui. "Shift Work and Child Behavioral Outcomes." Work Employment and Society 22,1(March 2008): 67-87.