Search Results

Source: Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Chapple, Constance L.
Johnson, Katherine A.
Gender Differences in Impulsivity
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 5,3 (July 2007): 221-234.
Also: http://yvj.sagepub.com/content/5/3/221.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Poverty; Discipline; Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Motor and Social Development (MSD); Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Punishment, Corporal

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Criminological theories have often stressed the importance of impulsivity in the etiology of delinquency. Whether this construct is termed impulsivity, self-control, or low constraint/ negative emotionality, the theoretical importance of impulsivity is clear. What is also clear is that boys and girls differ significantly on impulsivity; however, research is ambiguous on why this occurs. Some researchers suggest that socialization and parenting create different levels of impulsivity, whereas others suggest that cognitive and/or motor deficits early in life may be the source. Using longitudinal National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79)–Child data and variables derived from past research on impulsivity, the authors investigate whether biological, structural, and familial predictors of impulsivity differ by gender. Through multiple group path analysis, the authors find that the relationships between discipline and impulsivity and attachment and impulsivity differ significantly by gender. The authors discuss the implications of this finding for the etiology of impulsivity.
Bibliography Citation
Chapple, Constance L. and Katherine A. Johnson. "Gender Differences in Impulsivity ." Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 5,3 (July 2007): 221-234.
2. Connolly, Eric J.
Further Evaluating the Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences, Antisocial Behavior, and Violent Victimization: A Sibling-Comparison Analysis
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice published online (26 February 2019): DOI: 10.1177/1541204019833145.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1541204019833145
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Bullying/Victimization; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A developing line of research suggests that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) increase the risk for antisocial behavior and future victimization. However, the mechanisms that underlie this association remain largely speculative. To address this gap in the existing body of research, data on full siblings from a large population-based sample of youth were analyzed to evaluate the direct effect of ACEs on child antisocial behavior, adolescent delinquency, and young adult violent victimization after controlling for familial confounders. Traditional between-family analyses revealed that ACEs were significantly associated with higher levels of childhood antisocial behavior, adolescent delinquent behavior, and risk for violent crime victimization. After controlling for unmeasured common genetic and shared environmental confounds using fixed-effect sibling comparisons, siblings exposed to more ACEs did not demonstrate higher levels of antisocial behavior, delinquent behavior, or risk for future victimization. The implications of these results for future ACEs research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Connolly, Eric J. "Further Evaluating the Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences, Antisocial Behavior, and Violent Victimization: A Sibling-Comparison Analysis." Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice published online (26 February 2019): DOI: 10.1177/1541204019833145.
3. Connolly, Eric J.
Beaver, Kevin M.
Guns, Gangs, and Genes: Evidence of an Underlying Genetic Influence on Gang Involvement and Carrying a Handgun
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 13,3 (July 2015): 228-242.
Also: http://yvj.sagepub.com/content/13/3/228
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior, Violent; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Genetics; Handguns, carrying or using; Kinship; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Handgun and gang violence represent two important threats to public safety. Although several studies have examined the factors that increase the risk for gang membership and handgun carrying, few studies have explored the biosocial underpinnings to the development of both gang involvement and carrying a handgun. The current study addressed this gap in the literature by using kinship data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to estimate the genetic and environmental effects on gang membership, handgun carrying, and the covariance between the two. Results revealed that genetic and nonshared environmental influences accounted for much of the association between gang membership and handgun carrying. Implications of these findings for future gang research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Connolly, Eric J. and Kevin M. Beaver. "Guns, Gangs, and Genes: Evidence of an Underlying Genetic Influence on Gang Involvement and Carrying a Handgun." Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 13,3 (July 2015): 228-242.
4. DeCamp, Whitney
Newby, Brian
From Bullied to Deviant: The Victim-Offender Overlap Among Bullying Victims
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 13,1 (January 2015): 3-17.
Also: http://yvj.sagepub.com/content/13/1/3.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Bullying/Victimization; Crime; Gender Differences; Propensity Scores

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although much research has explored bullies and bullying victims, little has been done to explore the long-term effects on those who have been bullied. Separately, a growing body of evidence suggests that there is a victim-offender overlap, in which many victims are or become offenders themselves. Taken together, this suggests that bullying victims may themselves be at elevated risk of involvement in deviance or crime. The present study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to explore this issue, utilizing propensity score matching to control for the shared predictors of offending and victimization. Given that bullying experiences can vary dramatically by gender, gender-specific analyses are performed. Results indicate that controlling for the propensity to be bullied reduces, but does not eliminate, the effect on later criminality.
Bibliography Citation
DeCamp, Whitney and Brian Newby. "From Bullied to Deviant: The Victim-Offender Overlap Among Bullying Victims." Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 13,1 (January 2015): 3-17.
5. Mowen, Thomas
Brent, John
Bares, Kyle J.
How Arrest Impacts Delinquency Over Time Between and Within Individuals
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 16,4 (October 2018): 358-377.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1541204017712560
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Crime; Criminal Justice System; Delinquency/Gang Activity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While some studies find that criminal justice contact may deter future offending, another body of research indicates that contact with the criminal justice system can increase delinquency among youth. Although research has examined the relationship between punishment and offending, from a life-course perspective, we know little about between-individual and within-individual effects of punishment across time. Using a cross-lagged dynamic panel model, results from an analysis of four waves of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 demonstrate that arrest contributes to within-individual increases in delinquency across time even after baseline levels of delinquency are controlled. Between-individual results show that youth who were arrested experience significant increases in offending compared to youth never arrested even after accounting for prior offending. Finally, this study uncovers a "cumulative effect" of arrest in that each subsequent year the youth is arrested relates to increased offending irrespective of prior offending. Overall, findings suggest that arrest contributes to significant increases in delinquency even after baseline levels of offending are directly modeled.
Bibliography Citation
Mowen, Thomas, John Brent and Kyle J. Bares. "How Arrest Impacts Delinquency Over Time Between and Within Individuals." Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 16,4 (October 2018): 358-377.
6. Park, Suyeon
Morash, Merry
Stevens, Tia
Gender Differences in Predictors of Assaultive Behavior in Late Adolescence
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 8,4 (October 2010): 314-331.
Also: http://yvj.sagepub.com/content/8/4/314.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior, Antisocial; Behavior, Violent; Behavioral Problems; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Gender Differences; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Religious Influences; Risk Perception; Risk-Taking; Runaways

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article addresses controversy over gender differences in risk and protective factors for late-adolescence assaults. A secondary analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 cohort considered 2,552 youth aged 12 or 13 in the first survey wave. Comparison of girls and boys revealed, as expected, boys had higher levels of risk factors: early delinquency, gang involvement, and hopelessness. Girls were higher in the protective factors, parental monitoring, and school and religious ties; but boys were higher in parental support and work involvement. Negative binomial regression showed that gang exposure and hopelessness explained assaults, regardless of gender. For girls, early runaway behavior and work activity were positively, and parental monitoring was negatively, related to assaults. Unexpectedly, boys with high parental support were more assaultive than others. Prevention requires addressing negative contexts for all youth, but for girls, programs also must address conditions promoting their running away. Sage Publications Ltd., 6 Bonhill St. London EC2A 4PU UK
Bibliography Citation
Park, Suyeon, Merry Morash and Tia Stevens. "Gender Differences in Predictors of Assaultive Behavior in Late Adolescence." Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 8,4 (October 2010): 314-331.
7. Stevens, Tia
Morash, Merry
Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Boys' Probability of Arrest and Court Actions in 1980 and 2000: The Disproportionate Impact of "Getting Tough" on Crime
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 13,1 (January 2015): 77-95.
Also: http://yvj.sagepub.com/content/13/1/77.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Criminal Justice System; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Ethnic Differences; Male Sample; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study was designed to examine whether the shift in juvenile justice policy toward punitive sanctioning disproportionately impacted racial and ethnic minority boys. Using a nationally representative sample derived from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 and 1997 (NLSY79, NLSY97), this study examines 1980-2000 differences in contact with the justice system, controlling for self-reported delinquency. Results confirmed that boys in 2000 were significantly more likely than those in 1980 to report being charged with a crime. Once charged, they were less likely to be diverted and more likely to be convicted and placed in a correctional institution. Consideration of interaction effects revealed these effects were magnified for Black and Hispanic males. These findings provide evidence of a general trend toward more punitive treatment of boys in the juvenile justice system, especially racial and ethnic minority boys.
Bibliography Citation
Stevens, Tia and Merry Morash. "Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Boys' Probability of Arrest and Court Actions in 1980 and 2000: The Disproportionate Impact of "Getting Tough" on Crime." Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 13,1 (January 2015): 77-95.
8. Sullivan, Christopher J.
Early Adolescent Delinquency: Assessing the Role of Childhood Problems, Family Environment, and Peer Pressure
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 4,4 (October 2006): 291-313.
Also: http://yvj.sagepub.com/content/4/4/291.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parental Influences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Substance Use; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research has demonstrated a relationship between various types of emotional and behavioral problems and delinquency. Still, some aspects of this relationship are not as clear, particularly as pertains to emotional and behavioral problems and delinquent behavior across a broader range of time in the context of other key risk and protective factors. A three-pronged analytic approach examined the effects and function of key covariates on delinquent behavior in early adolescence. Childhood emotional and behavioral problems had a consistent, albeit modest, effect on delinquent behavior in early adolescence. Peer influence was found to be the strongest predictor of delinquent behavior, but family environment demonstrated a protective effect nonetheless. Implications for future research, theoretical elaboration, and policy initiatives are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Sullivan, Christopher J. "Early Adolescent Delinquency: Assessing the Role of Childhood Problems, Family Environment, and Peer Pressure." Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 4,4 (October 2006): 291-313.