Search Results

Source: Youth and Society
Resulting in 37 citations.
1. Aratani, Yumiko
Cooper, Janice L.
The Effects of Runaway-Homeless Episodes on High School Dropout
Youth and Society 47,2 (March 2015): 173-198.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/47/2/173.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Achievement; Dropouts; Family Environment; Homelessness; Propensity Scores; Runaways

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to examine the relationship between running away from home between the ages of 12 and 14 and dropping from high school among youth. Propensity score matching was conducted in estimating the effect of running away on high school dropout while controlling for confounding factors, such as familial instability and socioemotional health risks. The findings suggest that having runaway-homeless episodes have a detrimental effect on academic achievement.
Bibliography Citation
Aratani, Yumiko and Janice L. Cooper. "The Effects of Runaway-Homeless Episodes on High School Dropout." Youth and Society 47,2 (March 2015): 173-198.
2. Bahr, Stephen J.
Galligan, Richard J.
Teenage Marriage and Marital Stability
Youth and Society 15,4 (June 1984): 387-400.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/15/4/387
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Divorce; Education; Marital Stability; Marriage; Teenagers; Unemployment Duration; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This longitudinal study hypothesized that level of education and length of unemployment are intervening variables between divorce and age at marriage. This hypothesis was based on the notion that a low level of education and an increased probability of unemployment are consequences of early marriage that affect the rate of divorce. The data utilized were from the Young Men's cohort of the NLS. Findings indicated that those who married at a later age, who had more education, and who did not experience unemployment were more likely to remain in a stable marriage. These three independent variables accounted for approximately 15 percent of the variance in marital stability, thereby supporting the hypothesis. The data suggested that public policies supporting education and employment of young married people may reduce some of the economic stress that contributes to divorce.
Bibliography Citation
Bahr, Stephen J. and Richard J. Galligan. "Teenage Marriage and Marital Stability." Youth and Society 15,4 (June 1984): 387-400.
3. Beattie, Irenee Rose
Tracking Women's Transitions to Adulthood: Race, Curricular Tracking, and Young Adult Outcomes
Youth and Society 49,1 (January 2017): 96-117.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/49/1/96.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): High School Curriculum; High School Dropouts; Mothers, Adolescent; Poverty; Racial Differences; Transition, Adulthood; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Theories suggest curricular tracking is linked to racial/ethnic inequality. However, prior studies largely examine cognitive outcomes like standardized test scores and neglect behavioral outcomes. They also overlook potential racial/ethnic differences within curricular tracks. This study asks the following questions: (a) Is curricular tracking associated with young women's social and behavioral outcomes during the transition to adulthood (dropping out of high school, teen motherhood, and poverty)? and (b) Are there racial/ethnic differences in these associations? Using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data and logistic regression, results show that all women reduce risks of negative outcomes in the college and vocational tracks compared with the general track. However, college track coursework buffers White women from dropping out and teen motherhood (but not poverty) significantly more than it does Black and Latina women. Thus, racial gaps are greatest within the college track rather than lower tracks, suggesting that the college track may be a site for opportunity hoarding among Whites.
Bibliography Citation
Beattie, Irenee Rose. "Tracking Women's Transitions to Adulthood: Race, Curricular Tracking, and Young Adult Outcomes." Youth and Society 49,1 (January 2017): 96-117.
4. Blau, Francine D.
Youth and Jobs: Participation and Unemployment Rates
Youth and Society 11,1 (September 1979): 32-52.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/11/1/32
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Unemployment, Youth; Work Attitudes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research analyzes the relationship between local area unemployment rates and the youth labor supply. The net effect of the unemployment rate on the probability of labor force participation was found to be negative. Net discouragement was greater among women than men, and larger among blacks than among whites. The study also examines the net impact of the unemployment rate on labor supply adjustments over a one-year period in which no significant effect was found.
Bibliography Citation
Blau, Francine D. "Youth and Jobs: Participation and Unemployment Rates." Youth and Society 11,1 (September 1979): 32-52.
5. Borus, Michael E.
Carpenter, Susan A.
A Note on the Return of Dropouts to High School
Youth and Society 14,4 (June 1983): 501-507.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/14/4/501
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Educational Costs; High School; High School Dropouts; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

High school age dropouts who return to school each year are studied to test the hypothesis that the same variables leading to dropping out of school influence the decision to return to school. Findings show that older youth and those unable to specify their curriculum were less likely to return, and that young people expecting to attend college, as well as those who were never married, were more likely to return. In addition, youth living in countries where local government expenditures per student were over $975 were more likely to return than youth from countries where less was spent on schools. These findings contrast sharply with the many significant factors found affecting dropping out of school. Only age, intention not to attend college, and not being able to specify a curriculum were significant variables. They were positively related to dropping out and negatively related to returning to school. These findings suggest that the return to school decision is in many respects a random individual event.
Bibliography Citation
Borus, Michael E. and Susan A. Carpenter. "A Note on the Return of Dropouts to High School." Youth and Society 14,4 (June 1983): 501-507.
6. Cheng, Yen-Hsin Alice
Longer Exposure to Obesity, Slimmer Chance of College? Body Weight Trajectories, Non-Cognitive Skills, and College Completion
Youth and Society 49,2 (March 2017): 203-227.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0044118X14540183
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); College Graduates; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; Obesity; Personality/Big Five Factor Model or Traits; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The NLSY97 data were used to explore the patterns of developmental trajectories of body weight in adolescence and how they affected the likelihood of college completion in young adulthood among 2,275 youths aged 13 and 14 in Wave 1. A strong weight trajectory gradient was found for rates of college completion. The study further explored the role of non-cognitive traits in the association between weight trajectories and college attainment. Non-cognitive traits were found to partially mediate the impact of certain weight trajectories on the likelihood of college completion. Some moderating effects of conscientiousness were also found. The findings from the gender and weight trajectory interaction terms showed that a stronger negative impact of weight trajectory on college completion is only observed for women in the late-teen-onset overweight group. This study highlights the importance of using a longitudinal weight measure and the role of non-cognitive traits in adolescent obesity research.
Bibliography Citation
Cheng, Yen-Hsin Alice. "Longer Exposure to Obesity, Slimmer Chance of College? Body Weight Trajectories, Non-Cognitive Skills, and College Completion." Youth and Society 49,2 (March 2017): 203-227.
7. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Keil, Jacqueline M.
Laske, Mary Therese
Stewart, Jennifer
Bullying Behavior, Parents’ Work Hours and Early Adolescents’ Perceptions of Time Spent With Parents
Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1570-1595.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/43/4/1570.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Bullying/Victimization; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Interaction; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates the relationships among bullying behavior, mother’s and father’s work hours, and early adolescents’ perceptions of whether they spend sufficient time with their parents. In cross-sectional models, we find maternal work hours are modestly associated with increases in bullying behavior. However, in more rigorous change models, our findings indicate that over time maternal work hours bear no direct relationship to bullying behavior. Moreover, in our final models, an interaction between father’s work hours and perceptions of time spent with him has one of the most robust associations with bullying for adolescents. When paternal employment is full- or overtime and youth perceive they do not spend enough with their fathers, bullying behavior increases. Other important factors that shape bullying behavior are the quality of the home environment and the adolescent’s school performance.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Jacqueline M. Keil, Mary Therese Laske and Jennifer Stewart. "Bullying Behavior, Parents’ Work Hours and Early Adolescents’ Perceptions of Time Spent With Parents." Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1570-1595.
8. Crowley, Joan E.
Shapiro, David
Aspirations and Expectations of Youth in the United States: Part 1. Education and Fertility
Youth and Society 13,4 (June 1982): 391-422.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/13/4/391
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Children; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Fertility; Occupational Aspirations; Racial Differences; Sex Roles; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Training, Occupational; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the first wave of the NLSY are presented and young people's plans for education and for parenthood are examined. All analyses look at variation by race and sex. Half of the youth aspire to complete college, and almost all expect to complete at least high school. Two thirds express a desire for occupational training in addition to regular schooling. Analysis of expected fertility shows a strong preference for a two child family. A multivariate model was developed, using both socialization and human capital perspectives in the specification. Family background is highly significant in explaining plans for both education and fertility. Sex role traditionality was a highly significant predictor of the outcome variables for both men and women. With background factors controlled, black youth aspire to higher levels of education than do whites. Among young women, the expected inverse relationship between expected fertility and expected education was very weak, suggesting that these women do not expect their families to prevent their attainment of their educational goals.
Bibliography Citation
Crowley, Joan E. and David Shapiro. "Aspirations and Expectations of Youth in the United States: Part 1. Education and Fertility." Youth and Society 13,4 (June 1982): 391-422.
9. Gassanov, Margaret A.
Nicholson, Lisa M.
Koch-Turner, Amanda
Expectations to Marry Among American Youth: The Effects of Unwed Fertility, Economic Activity, and Cohabitation
Youth and Society 40,2 (December 2008): 265-288.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/40/2/265.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Life Course; Marriage; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Since welfare reform in 1996, marriage has been promoted as a means to reduce welfare dependency and out-of-wedlock childbearing. Despite extensive public and academic discourse surrounding marriage promotion, a basic factor preceding and predicting marriage—expectations to marry—has received little attention. Using insights from the life course perspective and data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we explore the relationship between out-of-wedlock fertility and youths' expectations to marry within 5 years. We also consider the effect of economic activity (school and work) and cohabitation. We find that experiencing an unwed pregnancy or birth significantly increases youths' expectations to marry, as does being employed, out of school, and in a cohabiting relationship. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Youth & Society is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Gassanov, Margaret A., Lisa M. Nicholson and Amanda Koch-Turner. "Expectations to Marry Among American Youth: The Effects of Unwed Fertility, Economic Activity, and Cohabitation." Youth and Society 40,2 (December 2008): 265-288.
10. Goodwin, Leonard
Poor Youth and Employment: A Social Psychological Perspective
Youth and Society 11,3 (March 1980): 311-351.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/11/3/311
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Earnings; Job Search; Poverty; Unemployment, Youth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper researches nonemployment of poor youth and its psychological impacts. The results illustrate high unemployment rates for poor youth. Youth programs such as supported work demonstration projects show that work effort increases markedly; however, this activity tends to decrease over time as the youths leave the programs and have to make their way in the regular labor market. In addition, loss of employment bears a negative psychological impact which discourages poor persons from further work effort. Such discouragement may underlie the findings of Becker and Hills (1979) and Corcoran (1979) that low employment during the teenage years seems to affect negatively the subsequent earnings of black teenaged males and the short term employment rate and longer- term earnings of poor teenaged women.
Bibliography Citation
Goodwin, Leonard. "Poor Youth and Employment: A Social Psychological Perspective." Youth and Society 11,3 (March 1980): 311-351.
11. Higgins, George E.
Piquero, Nicole L.
Piquero, Alex R.
General Strain Theory, Peer Rejection, and Delinquency/Crime
Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1272-1297.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/43/4/1272.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The development of general strain theory (GST) has led to a renewed focus on the influence of negative life experiences on antisocial behavior. Although a number of studies have generated an impressive array of support for the theory, several avenues remain open for research. In this article, we examine how a specific noxious stimuli, peer rejection, relates to delinquency/crime, and the degree of shared relation among peer rejection and delinquency/crime. Using data from a national sample of 413 children and adolescents, analyses indicated two highly stable trajectories of peer rejection and three trajectories of delinquency/crime, that peer rejection and delinquency/crime were not strongly related in general, but a joint analysis of their relationship revealed that high peer rejection was related to high delinquency/crime among males but not among females. Implications and directions for future research are highlighted.
Bibliography Citation
Higgins, George E., Nicole L. Piquero and Alex R. Piquero. "General Strain Theory, Peer Rejection, and Delinquency/Crime." Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1272-1297.
12. Hong, Jun Sung
Espelage, Dorothy L.
Sterzing, Paul R.
Understanding the Antecedents of Adverse Peer Relationships Among Early Adolescents in the United States: An Ecological Systems Analysis
Youth and Society 49,8 (November 2017): 999-1022.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0044118X15569215
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Health, Limiting Condition(s); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Poverty; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Neighborhood Effects; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; School Quality

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines ecological level correlates of adverse peer relationships among early adolescents (ages 12-14). Data analysis was conducted using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The sample was drawn from the mother-child data set, which included youth who in 2002 or 2004 were living with their mothers and enrolled in school. Eligible participants responded to at least 1 of the 13 items from the survey and their mothers responded to at least 1 of the 2 items measuring adverse peer relationships at Times 1 (2002/2004) and 2 (2004/2006). Multivariate hierarchical logistic regression was estimated. The presence of a learning disorder and adverse peer relationships at Time 1 (socio-demographics), perceptions of school environment (microsystem), and area of residence and perceptions of safety (exosystem) were all significantly associated with adverse peer relationships at Time 2. Assessing and targeting these ecological levels hold the potential to decrease adverse peer relationships among early adolescents.
Bibliography Citation
Hong, Jun Sung, Dorothy L. Espelage and Paul R. Sterzing. "Understanding the Antecedents of Adverse Peer Relationships Among Early Adolescents in the United States: An Ecological Systems Analysis." Youth and Society 49,8 (November 2017): 999-1022.
13. Houseknecht, Sharon K.
Hango, Darcy William
The Impact of Marital Conflict and Disruption on Children's Health
Youth and Society 38,1 (September 2006): 58-89.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/38/1/58
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Accidents; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Health; Children, Well-Being; Discipline; Family Income; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Marital Conflict; Marital Instability; Stress

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article investigates the effect of inconsistency between parental marital conflict and disruption on children's health. Inconsistent situations arise when minimal marital conflict precedes disruption or when marital conflict is high but there is no disruption. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, two alternative hypotheses, the stress vulnerable hypothesis and the stress resistant hypothesis, are tested. The latter hypothesis is based on recent evidence in the medical field. The results support the stress resistant hypothesis in that boys' health is enhanced when there is inconsistency between marital conflict and disruption. There are no significant effects for girls. The widespread notion that marital conflict and disruption have only adverse effects for children is challenged by the findings in this study. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Houseknecht, Sharon K. and Darcy William Hango. "The Impact of Marital Conflict and Disruption on Children's Health." Youth and Society 38,1 (September 2006): 58-89.
14. Huang, David Y.C.
Murphy, Debra A.
Hser, Yih-Ing
Developmental Trajectory of Sexual Risk Behaviors From Adolescence to Young Adulthood
Youth and Society 44,4 (December 2012): 479-499.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/44/4/479.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Risk-Taking; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined the trajectories of sexual risk behaviors among adolescents from ages 15 to 23 and factors associated with those trajectories. The sample was 5,419 adolescents from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Using group-based trajectory modeling, five distinctive trajectory groups were identified. The High group had a high and increased risk trajectory over the observed ages. The Decreased group had a risk trajectory that accelerated before age 19, but decreased afterwards. The risk trajectories of the Increased-Early and Increased-Late groups were low at age 15 but increased significantly starting at ages 16 and 18 for the groups, respectively. Participants in the Low group remained at low risk over time. Sexual risk behaviors were also positively associated with alcohol use, marijuana use, and delinquency. Results highlight the need for intervention efforts to consider developmental timing of sexual risk behaviors and their associations with other problem behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Huang, David Y.C., Debra A. Murphy and Yih-Ing Hser. "Developmental Trajectory of Sexual Risk Behaviors From Adolescence to Young Adulthood." Youth and Society 44,4 (December 2012): 479-499.
15. Kandel, Denise B.
Davies, Mark
Labor Force Experiences of a National Sample of Young Adult Men: The Role of Drug Involvement
Youth and Society 21,4 (June 1990): 411-445.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/21/4/411
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Drug Use; Earnings; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Unemployment Duration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The impact of the use of legal and illegal drugs on the labor force experiences of young adult men was investigated in the male sample (N not given) of the NLSY (ages 19-27 in 1984). Examined over an annual interval (1984/85) were hourly wage rate, number of employers, number of employment gaps, and number of weeks unemployed. Controlling for human capital resources, health, lifestyle characteristics, and local unemployment rate, illicit drug use was found to impact three aspects of work performance, but not wage rate. Use of cocaine increased job mobility, the number of gaps between employment spells, and duration of unemployment. The deterioration in labor force performance that results from drug use appears to reflect the impact of drug use itself over and beyond the impact of self-selection factors that determine initial drug involvement. Results also indicate that job mobility early in work careers lowers the earnings of young workers. The job search paradigm, in which a change of employers is assumed to maximize the fit between workers and jobs, does not apply to all young men. Job changes may result from different causes among different subgroups of the population, and do not necessarily lead to optimization of job rewards. (Sociological Abstracts, Inc.).
Bibliography Citation
Kandel, Denise B. and Mark Davies. "Labor Force Experiences of a National Sample of Young Adult Men: The Role of Drug Involvement." Youth and Society 21,4 (June 1990): 411-445.
16. Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Christie-Mizell, C. André
Depressed Mood and Body Weight
Youth and Society 41,4 (June 2010): 503-518.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/41/4/503.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 1994-1998 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth merged Mother and Young Adult file, this article examines the relationship between depressive symptoms and body mass index (BMI) in adolescence. The authors also examine whether this relationship varies by race and gender. Their findings indicate that over a 4-year period symptoms of depression are only related to increases in BMI for African American females. Stepfamily arrangements and poor neighborhood quality were more related to higher body mass index among White females. With the exception of household income predicting higher weight for African American males, their models were not very predictive for either African American or White males. They interpret their results within a family stress framework. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Youth & Society is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori and C. André Christie-Mizell. "Depressed Mood and Body Weight." Youth and Society 41,4 (June 2010): 503-518.
17. Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Dunifon, Rachel
Family Structure and Community Context: Evaluating Influences on Adolescent Outcomes
Youth and Society 38,1 (September 2006): 110-130.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/38/1/110
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Cohabitation; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Divorce; Family Structure; Marital Status; Neighborhood Effects; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parents, Single; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth merged mother-child file, this article examines the relationship between living in four different family structures on key measures of youth well-being, studied separately by race. The authors also examine whether contextual factors mediate these associations. For Black youth, we find no effects of family structure on youth well-being; however, community context measures are associated with youth outcomes. For White youth, single parenthood and cohabitation are associated with poorer youth outcomes; however, in some cases, these associations are mediated with the inclusion of the community context measures. [Specifically, we used data on mothers and their 14 to 19-year-old teens from the 1994, 1996, and 1998 youth supplements. All years of information for a given teen were pooled in a stacked, person–year dataset.][ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori and Rachel Dunifon. "Family Structure and Community Context: Evaluating Influences on Adolescent Outcomes." Youth and Society 38,1 (September 2006): 110-130.
18. Leech, Tamara G. J.
Subsidized Housing, Public Housing, and Adolescent Violence and Substance Use
Youth and Society 44,2 (June 2012): 217-235.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/44/2/217.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Public Housing; Residence; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the separate relationships of public housing residence and subsidized housing residence to adolescent health risk behavior. Data include 2,530 adolescents aged 14 to 19 who were children of the National the Longitudinal Study of Youth. The author use stratified propensity methods to compare the behaviors of each group—subsidized housing residents and public housing residents—to a matched control group of teens receiving no housing assistance. The results reveal no significant relationship between public housing residence and violence, heavy alcohol/marijuana use, or other drug use. However, subsidized housing residents have significantly lower rates of violence and hard drug use, and marginally lower rates of heavy marijuana/alcohol use. The results indicate that the consistent, positive effect of vouchers in the current literature is not due to a lower standard among the typical comparison group: public housing. Future studies should focus on conceptualizing and analyzing the protective effect of vouchers beyond comparisons to public housing environments.
Bibliography Citation
Leech, Tamara G. J. "Subsidized Housing, Public Housing, and Adolescent Violence and Substance Use." Youth and Society 44,2 (June 2012): 217-235.
19. Lerman, Robert I.
Who are the Young Absent Fathers?
Youth and Society 18,1 (September 1986): 3-27.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/18/1/3
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Children; Fathers, Influence; Hispanics; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Characteristics of young absent fathers in the United States are investigated using data from the NLSY (number of cases = 12,686 individuals aged 14-21 in 1979); follow-up interviews were conducted with 90% of the initial sample each year from 1980 to 1985. Tabulations of the data reveal that 1 in 3 young fathers live apart from at least 1 of their children. Although most absent fathers are white, young black males are more likely to become absent fathers than are whites or Hispanics. Of young black fathers, 70% are absent, and their absence or presence does not necessarily correspond with their marital status. Absent fathers, particularly whites and Hispanics, grew up in lower-income families than did other youth, and had less favorable employment and educational backgrounds. Directions for future research are discussed. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc.]
Bibliography Citation
Lerman, Robert I. "Who are the Young Absent Fathers?" Youth and Society 18,1 (September 1986): 3-27.
20. Lichter, Daniel T.
Shanahan, Michael J.
Gardner, Erica L.
Helping Others? The Effects of Childhood Poverty and Family Instability on Prosocial Behavior
Youth and Society 34,1 (September 2002): 89-119.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/34/1/89.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior, Prosocial; Family Structure; Modeling, Mixed Effects; Volunteer Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the relationship between poverty and family instability during childhood on prosocial behavior--volunteerism--during late adolescence. The 1996 Young Adult supplements of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) are linked to mother and family records from the 1979-1996 main NLSY sample to create life history records spanning childhood and adolescence. Adolescents--especially males--from single-parent families are less likely than those growing up in married-couple households to be involved with volunteer work. Volunteerism is more strongly related to time spent in poverty among females than males. The results support a mediational model, in which negative effects of childhood social and ecnomic disadvantages on later prosocial behavior occur indirectly through effects on socioemotional development and life experiences during adolescence. The results inform current concerns about putative declines in a civil society and the elevation of individualism over communalism among today's young people.
Bibliography Citation
Lichter, Daniel T., Michael J. Shanahan and Erica L. Gardner. "Helping Others? The Effects of Childhood Poverty and Family Instability on Prosocial Behavior." Youth and Society 34,1 (September 2002): 89-119.
21. Mowen, Thomas
Schroeder, Ryan D.
Maternal Parenting Style and Delinquency by Race and the Moderating Effect of Structural Disadvantage
Youth and Society 50,2 (March 2018): 139-159.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0044118X15598028
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Neighborhood Effects; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Contemporary research suggests authoritative parenting is the most effective parenting style in deterring juvenile delinquency. Some research has found there are differences in parenting style between racial groups due to structural disadvantage faced by marginalized individuals. Yet, relatively little is known about how racial differences in parenting and the moderating effect of disadvantage relate to juvenile delinquency. The current project explores parenting style differences among Black, Hispanic, and White mothers and the moderating impact of disadvantage on delinquency. Results indicate authoritarian parenting is least effective in deterring delinquency among all racial groups; however, neighborhood disadvantage provides a negative moderating effect between authoritarian parenting and delinquency for Black youth only, whereas uninvolved parenting was related to delinquency for White youth only.
Bibliography Citation
Mowen, Thomas and Ryan D. Schroeder. "Maternal Parenting Style and Delinquency by Race and the Moderating Effect of Structural Disadvantage." Youth and Society 50,2 (March 2018): 139-159.
22. Pain, Emily
Is Teen Risk of Having Sex With Strangers Associated With Family Environment? Family Processes, Household Structure, and Adolescent Sex With Strangers
Youth and Society published online (3 May 2018): DOI: 10.1177/0044118X18772698.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0044118X18772698
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Family Structure; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parenting Skills/Styles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research on family contexts and adolescent sexual risk behavior has largely neglected relational aspects of sexual risk, such as having sex with strangers. The present study uses the NLSY97 to examine associations between sexually active adolescents' sex with strangers and parental monitoring, support, strictness, and household structure. More than 12% of the sample report having sex with a stranger within the past year (19% of boys and 5% of girls). Generalized estimating equation models indicate that high monitoring and strictness may have protective effects for risk of sex with strangers, whereas inconsistent parenting styles and living in biological-father/stepmother homes may increase this risk. Boys appear to respond more strongly to parental strictness than girls, and mothers' parenting processes may matter more for risk of sex with strangers than fathers'. These findings suggest there are gendered ways that healthy family contexts might reduce adolescents' risk of sex with strangers.
Bibliography Citation
Pain, Emily. "Is Teen Risk of Having Sex With Strangers Associated With Family Environment? Family Processes, Household Structure, and Adolescent Sex With Strangers." Youth and Society published online (3 May 2018): DOI: 10.1177/0044118X18772698.
23. Pirog-Good, Maureen A.
The Family Background and Attitudes of Teen Fathers
Youth and Society 26,3 (March 1995): 351-376.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/26/3/351.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Attitudes; Family Background; Fathers, Influence; Household Composition; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Male Sample; Poverty; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem; Sex Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the family background and attitudes of adolescent fathers. A greater percentage of teen fathers than of teenagers who are not fathers come from poor and unstable households whose members are less educated. Generally speaking, for Whites, being a teenage father is associated with having a low self-esteem, an external locus of control, and conservative sex-role attitudes, whereas for Blacks, it is not. Data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort.
Bibliography Citation
Pirog-Good, Maureen A. "The Family Background and Attitudes of Teen Fathers." Youth and Society 26,3 (March 1995): 351-376.
24. Pirog, Maureen
Jung, Haeil
Lee, Daewoo
The Changing Face of Teenage Parenthood in the United States: Evidence from NLSY79 and NLSY97
Child and Youth Care Forum 47,3 (June 2018): 317-342.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10566-017-9417-y
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Fatherhood; Parenthood; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: In this study, we provide an updated report on differences in adult cohabitation rates during past decades, examine the risk factors associated with becoming a teen parent, and track teen parents' educational and labor market outcomes until the age of 29 to examine whether the outcomes associated with become teen parents have changed in recent decades.

Methods: We select two nationally representative birth cohorts in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) 1979 and 1997 (N = 9821). We use the difference-in-difference approach to examine whether the positions of teen parents have progressed or worsened across the two cohorts.

Conclusion: The birth rates to teenage girls remained unchanged across the two cohorts, but the reported rates of teenage fatherhood increased. The proportions of both unmarried teenage fathers and mothers increased between the two cohorts. Teen fathers and mothers came increasingly from single-mother families with disadvantaged backgrounds. The proportion of teen mothers or fathers living with partners has not changed, but there has been a major shift from marriage to non-marital cohabitation. The education and earnings of the 1997 cohort of teen parents showed some progress relative to the earlier teen parent cohort, but no progress relative to peers who were not teen parents.

Bibliography Citation
Pirog, Maureen, Haeil Jung and Daewoo Lee. "The Changing Face of Teenage Parenthood in the United States: Evidence from NLSY79 and NLSY97." Child and Youth Care Forum 47,3 (June 2018): 317-342.
25. Rumberger, Russell W.
Recent High School and College Experiences of Youth: Variations by Race, Sex, and Social Class
Youth and Society 13,4 (June 1982): 449-470.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/13/4/449
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): College Education; Dropouts; High School; Racial Differences; Sex Roles; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Interview data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Labor Market Experience for a sample of 12,700 youths aged 14-21 are used to examine several elements of their high school & Coll experiences, noting their variation by race, sex, & SE background. Examined at the high school level are attitudes toward school, performance, programs & courses, & the problems of dropping out; at the Coll level, they include participation rates, attendance patterns, major fields of study, & sources of financial aid. Results reveal substantial differences in some areas but not in others; eg, attitudes toward school & Coll participation rates vary little among groups, while high school dropout rates vary widely among race & SE groups, & Coll majors vary somewhat among racial groups & particularly between men & women. 8 Tables, 29 References. Modified AA
Bibliography Citation
Rumberger, Russell W. "Recent High School and College Experiences of Youth: Variations by Race, Sex, and Social Class." Youth and Society 13,4 (June 1982): 449-470.
26. Schroeder, Ryan D.
Mowen, Thomas
Parenting Style Transitions and Delinquency
Youth and Society 46,2 (March 2014): 228-254.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/46/2/228.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Life Course; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Parenting style has been extensively analyzed as a contributor to juvenile delinquency in the criminological literature, but no research to date has assessed the prevalence of parenting style changes during adolescence or the influence of such parenting style changes on juvenile delinquency. Drawing from the life course theory, the results show that parenting style transitions are common across the first and third waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997. Furthermore, specific parenting style shifts are associated with changes in juvenile delinquency, most notably the shifts characterized by a decrease in responsiveness or an increase or decrease in demandingness. Last, changes in maternal attachment associated with parenting style changes partially mediate the effect of such transitions on delinquent outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Schroeder, Ryan D. and Thomas Mowen. "Parenting Style Transitions and Delinquency." Youth and Society 46,2 (March 2014): 228-254.
27. Shapiro, David
Crowley, Joan E.
Aspirations and Expectations of Youth in the United States. Part 2. Employment Activity
Youth and Society 14,1 (September 1982): 33-58.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/13/4/449
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Duncan Index; Family Influences; Hispanics; Occupational Aspirations; Religious Influences; Role Models; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Teenagers; White Collar Jobs

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The occupational aspirations of respondents on the first wave of the NLSY are described. Respondents were asked what they would like to be doing at age 35. Almost 90 percent of the youth had specific occupational goals. For both men and women, over one-third of the respondents aspire to professional or technical employment. The existing segregation of the labor market is reflected in the aspirations of youth, with females predominating among those aspiring to clerical positions and males predominating among those aspiring to skilled trades. About one-quarter of the young women expect to be housewives, although this aspiration was almost twice as prevalent among whites and Hispanics than among blacks. Looking only at those youth with specific occupational aspirations, it is clear that the proportion of youth expecting to be in professional occupations is much larger than the proportion of such jobs in the general labor market. In a multivariate analysis, family background and sex role attitudes were important predictors of the prestige of the desired occupation for both young men and young women. When the aspirations of women in the youth cohort were compared with the aspirations of women of the same age a decade earlier (using the NLS of Young Women), clear shifts away from housework to paid employment, and from lower skill to higher skill occupations were shown. For young women, a multivariate analysis of aspirations for sex- role atypical jobs showed that family background and maternal role modeling were significantly related to such aspirations.
Bibliography Citation
Shapiro, David and Joan E. Crowley. "Aspirations and Expectations of Youth in the United States. Part 2. Employment Activity." Youth and Society 14,1 (September 1982): 33-58.
28. Steel, Lauri
Early Work Experience among White and Non-White Youths: Implications for Subsequent Enrollment and Employment
Youth and Society 22,4 (June 1991): 419-447.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/22/4/419
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Employment; Employment, In-School; Gender Differences; High School Dropouts; Hispanics; Labor Force Participation; Racial Differences; Schooling; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigated whether the previously observed negative associations between early work experience and schooling would be mitigated in a cohort for whom such work experience was more typical. Subjects were 1,346 males and 1,379 females (aged 17-18 yrs) from the NLSY. There were 1,578 whites, 410 Hispanics, and 737 blacks. Early employment (EE) was associated with higher subsequent enrollment for white youths, with the exception of white males working full time or nearly full time. Among white males and among blacks, however, working longer hours in 1979 was associated with lower subsequent enrollment. EE appeared to be compatible with continued enrollment for white women and for white men working low to moderate amounts. However, among non-whites and white men working close to full time, EE appeared to represent a competing alternative to schooling. [PsycINFO]
Bibliography Citation
Steel, Lauri. "Early Work Experience among White and Non-White Youths: Implications for Subsequent Enrollment and Employment." Youth and Society 22,4 (June 1991): 419-447.
29. Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr.
From School to Work: A Transition with Job Search Implications
Youth and Society 11,1 (September 1979): 114-132.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/11/1/114
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Search; Marital Status; Part-Time Work; Schooling; Transition, School to Work; Unemployment; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article adapts a human capital model of schooling and earnings to focus on the transition period. The adaptation consists of two steps. First, unemployment incidence and duration after last leaving school, but prior to the first job taken, is included as an intervening part of the transition process. A second feature is the consideration of the extent to which job holding while in school alters subsequent unemployment and wage rates. The main result concerns the unemployment and wage equations. Holding a job while in school lowers the incidence of duration of later unemployment and raises the subsequent hourly wage for both white and black youth. Full-time job effects exceed part-time job effects in both equations and all effects are highly significant statistically. Job search theory suggests some types of unemployment behavior may lead to a higher wage, and a positive but nonsignificant effect of unemployment on the postschool wage was found for black youth. For white youth, however, significant and negative impacts of unemployment on the postschool wage were found.
Bibliography Citation
Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr. "From School to Work: A Transition with Job Search Implications." Youth and Society 11,1 (September 1979): 114-132.
30. Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr.
Young Women and Labor: In-School Labor Force Status and Early Postschool Labor Market Outcomes
Youth and Society 13,2 (December 1981): 123-155.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/13/2/123
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Earnings; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; High School; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Outcomes; Marriage; Part-Time Work; Poverty; Work Knowledge

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article uses a national data source, the NLS of Young Women, to consider four dependent variables: annual weeks worked, annual weeks unemployed, annual earnings, and hourly rate of pay. For each dependent variable, the parameters are estimated in Tobit models. In the racially pooled analysis, three model specifications are used for each variable and two main sets of results emerge. First, in-school labor force participation raises relative post-school weeks worked, earnings, and hourly wage rates. Post-school marriage and work-limiting health limits were found to be dominant determinants of the labor market outcomes. In addition, the findings showed post-school weeks unemployed to be significantly lower if the woman was a part- time worker in school.
Bibliography Citation
Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr. "Young Women and Labor: In-School Labor Force Status and Early Postschool Labor Market Outcomes." Youth and Society 13,2 (December 1981): 123-155.
31. Stevens, Tia
Morash, Merry
Park, Suyeon
Late-Adolescent Delinquency: Risks and Resilience for Girls Differing in Risk at the Start of Adolescence
Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1433-1458.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/43/4/1433.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Influences; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Poverty; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Based on resilience and feminist criminological theories, several individual, family, and community characteristics were hypothesized to predict late-adolescent delinquency for girls varying in early-adolescent risk. Girls aged 12 and 13 were interviewed each year as part of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Predictors of late-adolescent delinquency were compared for girls in and below the top 10% in self-reported early-adolescent delinquency. Girls who were higher in delinquency in early adolescence were resilient by 2002 if they had no incarcerated family members and high parental monitoring. Girls with little or no early delinquency were at risk for illegal activity by age 17 primarily due to contextual adversities, low hope for the future, poverty status, and minority racial status. Persistently delinquent girls require programming to address multiple risk and protective factors over an extended time. To prevent delinquency beginning later in adolescence, girls need safe community and school contexts.
Bibliography Citation
Stevens, Tia, Merry Morash and Suyeon Park. "Late-Adolescent Delinquency: Risks and Resilience for Girls Differing in Risk at the Start of Adolescence." Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1433-1458.
32. Taggart, Robert
Sum, Andrew
Berlin, Gordon L.
Basic Skills: The Sine Qua Non
Youth and Society 19,1 (September 1987): 3-21.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/19/1/3
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Childbearing; College Enrollment; Education; Educational Attainment; Fertility; GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development; High School Dropouts; Poverty; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the NLSY and the 1980 Armed Service Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) administration, this paper examines the devastating impact that lack of basic skills and competencies has on the ability of America's young people to compete in school and in the workplace.
Bibliography Citation
Taggart, Robert, Andrew Sum and Gordon L. Berlin. "Basic Skills: The Sine Qua Non." Youth and Society 19,1 (September 1987): 3-21.
33. Tan, Kevin
Heath, Ryan D.
Das, Aditi
Choi, Yoonsun
Gender Differences in Patterns of School Victimization and Problem Behaviors During Middle School and Their Relation to High School Graduation
Youth and Society published online (20 November 2017): DOI: 10.1177/0044118X17741143.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0044118X17741143
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Bullying/Victimization; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Victimization and problem behaviors during middle school detrimentally influence student learning. However, less is known about how they may cooccur and collectively affect high school graduation and whether the interrelationships vary by gender. Using data from a nationally representative cohort of seventh-grade students from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997; N = 1,009), latent class analyses identified three groups among boys and two among girls. Results indicated that 50% of boys in the high-risk group (high victimization and problem behaviors) did not graduate from high school on time. Furthermore, boys in the moderate-risk group (high victimization, low problem behaviors) graduated from high school on time at a rate comparable with the low-risk boys. Two groups emerged for girls (i.e., low vs. high risk) in which each corresponds to graduation in an expected direction. Findings from this study underscore the importance of gender differences in intervention efforts, especially during middle school.
Bibliography Citation
Tan, Kevin, Ryan D. Heath, Aditi Das and Yoonsun Choi. "Gender Differences in Patterns of School Victimization and Problem Behaviors During Middle School and Their Relation to High School Graduation." Youth and Society published online (20 November 2017): DOI: 10.1177/0044118X17741143.
34. Tapia, Michael
U.S. Juvenile Arrests: Gang Membership, Social Class, and Labeling Effects
Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1407-1432.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/43/4/1407.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Arrests; Criminal Justice System; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Modeling, Poisson (IRT–ZIP); Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study addresses the link between gang membership and arrest frequency, exploring the Gang × Socioeconomic status interaction on those arrests. Notoriously poor, delinquent, and often well-known to police, America’s gang youth should have very high odds of arrest. Yet it is unclear whether mere membership in a gang increases the risk of arrest or whether it must be accompanied by high levels of delinquency to have an effect. There are surprisingly few tests of the arrest risk associated solely with group membership. The several studies that provide such a test have yielded mixed results. Revisiting this issue with longitudinal youth data for the nation, random effects Poisson models find main effects for gang membership and SES on arrest, controlling for demographic and legal items. However, interaction effects obtain paradoxical findings consistent with research on “out-of-place” effects for high-SES gang youth, and protective effects for low-SES gang youth. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for labeling theory and the federal initiative on disproportionate minority contact (DMC) with the juvenile justice system.
Bibliography Citation
Tapia, Michael. "U.S. Juvenile Arrests: Gang Membership, Social Class, and Labeling Effects." Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1407-1432.
35. Trent, Katherine
Family Context and Adolescents' Fertility Expectations
Youth and Society 26,1 (September 1994): 118-137.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/26/1/118.short
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; Economics of Minorities; Education, Secondary; Family Background; Family Environment; Family Size; Hispanics; Parenthood; Poverty; Racial Differences; Regions; Religion; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience of Youth are used to examine and contrast the effects of family context and individual characteristics on adolescents' expectations about adolescent fertility, nonmarital childbearing, family size, and childlessness. Socioeconomic and racial patterns are identified. The findings indicate that family structure has modest but specific effects on adolescents' fertility expectations. Living with mothers only increases expectations for nonmarital childbearing, and living with fathers (without biological mother) lowers the total number of children expected.
Bibliography Citation
Trent, Katherine. "Family Context and Adolescents' Fertility Expectations." Youth and Society 26,1 (September 1994): 118-137.
36. Wildsmith, Elizabeth
Manlove, Jennifer S.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Teenage Childbearing among Youth Born to Teenage Mothers
Youth and Society 44,2 (June 2012): 258-283.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/44/2/258.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Mothers, Adolescent; Poverty; Risk-Taking; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this article examined how early maternal characteristics, an adolescent’s family environment, and the adolescent’s own attitudes and behaviors were associated with the odds of a nonmarital teenage birth among youth born to teenage mothers. Multivariate analyses indicated that these domains were closely linked. Early maternal characteristics shaped the later family environment of adolescents (parenting quality and home environment), which, in turn, was associated with the attitudes and behaviors of teens that put them at risk of a nonmarital birth. Notably, there was variation in some of the associations by gender. Increased mother’s cognitive ability lowered the risk of a nonmarital birth for boys, but not for girls, whereas fertility expectations were significant for girls, but not for boys. There were no race-ethnic differences in the risk of a teenage birth among girls, although Black boys had a higher risk than White boys.
Bibliography Citation
Wildsmith, Elizabeth, Jennifer S. Manlove, Susan Marie Jekielek and Kristin Anderson Moore. "Teenage Childbearing among Youth Born to Teenage Mothers." Youth and Society 44,2 (June 2012): 258-283.
37. Wildsmith, Elizabeth
Manlove, Jennifer S.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Mincieli, Lisa A.
Teenage Childbearing Among Youth Born to Teenage Mothers
Youth and Society 44,2 (June 2012): 258-283.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/44/2/258.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Cognitive Ability; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Family Environment; Family Structure; First Birth; Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Racial Differences; Religion

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this article examined how early maternal characteristics, an adolescent’s family environment, and the adolescent’s own attitudes and behaviors were associated with the odds of a nonmarital teenage birth among youth born to teenage mothers. Multivariate analyses indicated that these domains were closely linked. Early maternal characteristics shaped the later family environment of adolescents (parenting quality and home environment), which, in turn, was associated with the attitudes and behaviors of teens that put them at risk of a nonmarital birth. Notably, there was variation in some of the associations by gender. Increased mother’s cognitive ability lowered the risk of a nonmarital birth for boys, but not for girls, whereas fertility expectations were significant for girls, but not for boys. There were no race-ethnic differences in the risk of a teenage birth among girls, although Black boys had a higher risk than White boys.
Bibliography Citation
Wildsmith, Elizabeth, Jennifer S. Manlove, Susan Marie Jekielek, Kristin Anderson Moore and Lisa A. Mincieli. "Teenage Childbearing Among Youth Born to Teenage Mothers." Youth and Society 44,2 (June 2012): 258-283.