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Title: "Bad Jobs" for Families: Job Quality and Family Outcomes in the Context of Labor Market Changes
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Lim, So-Jung
"Bad Jobs" for Families: Job Quality and Family Outcomes in the Context of Labor Market Changes
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2013
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); CESD (Depression Scale); Child Health; Children, Mental Health; Children, Well-Being; Depression (see also CESD); Divorce; Gender Differences; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Characteristics; Marital Dissolution; Marital Stability; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Part-Time Work; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

My dissertation examines how changing labor market conditions in the post 1970s era, characterized by the deterioration and polarization of job opportunities and quality, have impacted key family outcomes in the United States. For this purpose, I use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and the NLSY79 Children and Young Adults to examine the relationships between various indicators of job quality and three key family outcomes: namely, marital formation, marital dissolution, and children's health. Built upon the growing body of literature on "bad jobs" and labor market changes, I incorporate various indicators of job quality, including the provision of health and pension benefits, nonstandard work schedules, and nonstandard employment.

Study findings suggest that job quality may be an important economic indicator for family outcomes (either practical or symbolic). I find that having employment with "bad job" characteristics, especially the lack of health insurance and pension benefits, significantly delays men's transition to first marriage. In addition, women's job quality is important for marital stability in that working in jobs without health insurance decreases the risk of divorce among women. I also find that a mother's low-quality nonstandard employment (e.g., part-time, contract work) is detrimental to her children's health, particularly so in single-mother families. The absence of health insurance from mother's nonstandard employment is associated with worse health outcomes for children in single-mother families than those in two-parent families.

As the first study to incorporate various measures of "bad job" quality in key family outcomes, my dissertation contributes to the theoretical discussions of the causes of family inequality since deteriorating job quality and increasing labor market inequality have been hypothesized as leading influences on family changes but have not yet been empirically tested. Beyond theory, my research can also inform policy debates surrounding the linkages between work, family, and the well-being of both adults and children, as well as the implications of these relationships for the increasing inequality in the U.S. in the context of labor market changes.

Bibliography Citation
Lim, So-Jung. "Bad Jobs" for Families: Job Quality and Family Outcomes in the Context of Labor Market Changes. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2013.