Search Results

Title: Child-Care Arrangements of Young Working Mothers
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Child-Care Arrangements of Young Working Mothers
Work and Family, Report 820. Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, 1992.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlswk007.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Support; Dual-Career Families; Earnings; Family Income; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Shift Workers; Work Hours

Uses the 1988 data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth on the income of men, aged 23 to 31, who are noncustodial fathers. Based on 872 men who are non custodial fathers examines the father's income needed to pay the hypothetical minimum assured benefit for the children with whom they do not live. Sixty-five percent of young noncustodial fathers could pay the entire hypothetical minimum assured benefit with less than two-fifths of their gross income. For example, 35 percent could pay at least the entire hypothetical minimum assured benefit using less than one-fifth of their income and 30 percent would use between one-fifth and two-fifths. At the other end of the income range, however, 9 percent have no income; to pay the entire hypothetical minimum assured benefit, 14 percent would pay four-fifths or more of their income and 12 percent would use between two-fifths and four-fifths of their income. Also estimated the payments these same fathers would be required to make under a percentage-of-income guideline, typical of state child support guidelines, and then compared these payments with the hypothetical minimum assured benefit. We found that 34 percent of the fathers would be required to pay the entire hypothetical minimum assured benefit; 9 percent would pay nothing because they have no income; and 57 percent would be required to pay part of the minimum assured benefit. 29 percent would be exempt from making child support payments; and 37 percent would be required to pay a part of the minimum assured benefit. In particular, 6 percent of young noncustodial fathers would have their payments lowered because full payment would cause them to live in poverty. Policy makers can use these data in considering how much they want to require noncustodial fathers to pay for the support of their children under a child support assurance system.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Child-Care Arrangements of Young Working Mothers." Work and Family, Report 820. Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, 1992.