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Title: College as a "Contested Terrain" Heterogeneous Effects of Majors on College Pathways and Post-College Outcomes
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. In, Jung
College as a "Contested Terrain" Heterogeneous Effects of Majors on College Pathways and Post-College Outcomes
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Graduates; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Family Background; Income; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Sociologists have long debated the effects of family origin on the outcomes of college graduates. Inspired by recent evidence of this effect, we examine how children's college majors and post-college outcomes mediate the effects of family origin using NLSY79. Theoretically, this paper distinguishes between the effect of heterogeneous paths and the heterogeneous effects of the same path. The results show that family origin only negatively affected the post-college income of female graduates who chose vocational majors. This implies that the choice of a vocational major in college potentially functioned as an equalizer for women with less privileged family origins.
Bibliography Citation
In, Jung. "College as a "Contested Terrain" Heterogeneous Effects of Majors on College Pathways and Post-College Outcomes." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017.