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Title: Differences in Expected and Actual Retirement Age Among Older Men
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Beck, Scott Herman
Differences in Expected and Actual Retirement Age Among Older Men
Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Florida, 1981. DAI-A 43/01, p. 268, July 1982
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Assets; Behavior; Health Factors; Retirement

This thesis is a study of retirement that analyzes the discrepancy between the expected age and the actual age of retirement. The conceptual model used combines Atchley's (1979) general model of the retirement process with the approach of attitude-behavior theory. Three general factors are hypothesized to determine both the expected age and actual age. The factors are (1) constraint factors, (2) job-related factors, and (3) social and psychological factors. A secondary hypothesis concerns adjustment to retirement. It is hypothesized that discrepancies between the actual and expected age of retirement, especially earlier-than-expected retirement, will lead to less successful adjustment to retirement. Panel data collected between 1966 and 1976 on men aged 45-59 in 1966, were used to investigate these relationships. Because of the truncated age range of the respondents, the average age of retirement was 61 years, while the average expected age was about 65 years. A low correlation was found between expected and actual age. An analysis of change in expected age over the ten years of the survey, using panel members who had not retired, showed a large degree of instability in expected age. In a regression analysis of the expected age among men who had retired, predictors in all three of the general factors significantly affected the expected age. Mandatory retirement policies and pension eligibility reduced the expected age while commitment to work increased the expected age. Older workers expected to retire later, but this finding may be an artifact of the data. In the regression analysis of actual age only work-related health limitations, which reduce the age of retirement, were significant. In considering the discrepancy between the actual and expected age, mandatory retirement policies, eligibility for a pension and higher assets reduced the negative difference between the actual and expected age, while the existence of a work-related health limitation and high commitment to work increased the negative discrepancy. With respect to retirement satisfaction, earlier-than-expected retirement led to lower satisfaction with retirement.
Bibliography Citation
Beck, Scott Herman. Differences in Expected and Actual Retirement Age Among Older Men. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Florida, 1981. DAI-A 43/01, p. 268, July 1982.