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Title: Funding Sources, Family Income, and Fields of Study at Four-year Colleges
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Quadlin, Natasha Y.
Funding Sources, Family Income, and Fields of Study at Four-year Colleges
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Cost; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Debt/Borrowing; Family Income; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research shows that receiving loans, family contributions, and grants has implications for college students, but one key outcome has been overlooked--fields of study. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I assess how college funding is associated with first-term major and course selection throughout college. I find that as students' funding from loans increases, they are more likely to major in applied non-STEM fields (e.g., business), and less likely to be undeclared during the first term--particularly if they are from low- or middle-income families. Conversely, as funding from family contributions increases, students are more likely to be undeclared, and less likely to major or take courses in applied non-STEM fields. Receiving grants has little association with major or course fields. I argue that funding sources act as opportunities and constraints for college students, and that fields of study are the product of multiple sources of inequality.
Bibliography Citation
Quadlin, Natasha Y. "Funding Sources, Family Income, and Fields of Study at Four-year Colleges." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.